F-TR .223 loads

Discussion in 'Reloading Forum (All Calibers)' started by shootmore, Feb 26, 2019.

  1. FAF1947

    FAF1947

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    With my .223 Savage F/TR I am using 24.0 grains of Varget, Laupua brass, Rem 7 1/2 primers and Sierra 80 Match Kings. This load has been shooting well for me. Last three 600 yard matches were 594, 595 and 590.
     
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  2. Kurt Blasser

    Kurt Blasser Silver $$ Contributor

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    There can be quite a bit of difference in measurements with the Hornady OAL gauge, from a sensation of a hard jam to a sensation of initial touch. What are you doing? I try to do a sensation of just touching.
     
  3. Ned Ludd

    Ned Ludd Gold $$ Contributor

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    In my hands, it only took a bit of practice with my .308s to develop a good feel for just a very light "touch". However, the .223s with 90s are a different animal, because of the relatively long and tight freebore. According to the prints, my .223 reamers cut a freebore diameter of 0.2242" +/- tolerance. My .308 reamers all cut 0.3085" +/- tolerance. 30 cal bullets always seem to slide right in until they encounter the lands, which makes it easy to feel the "touch". In contrast, the 90 VLDs stop when they first encounter the leading edge of the freebore/throat. It's easy to feel that light "touch" when a 90 VLD first encounters the leading edge of the freebore/throat. But the fact that you have to bear down on the push-rod to get the bullet moving again within the freebore, keep up the pressure to keep it moving, then feel the slight "touch" when it actually touches the lands makes it a much trickier business. All I cay say is that I practiced quite a bit until I felt comfortable with it. If I haven't used the Hornady OAL gauge on a .223 for a while, I will usually practice a bit more until I am comfortable taking actual measurements.
     
  4. brians356

    brians356 Gold $$ Contributor

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    And for a particular bullet diameter, a smaller capacity case yields more pressure reduction than a larger case for a given OAL increase. If the 223 had a longer neck, it could be stretched even more.
    -
     
  5. jsthntn247

    jsthntn247

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    You just shot 19x on one string too. I wouldn't change a thing
     
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  6. Snuggie

    Snuggie F/TR-F/Open Gold $$ Contributor

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    Ya got a good point there bro! Ain’t changing a thing! I’m happy!
     
  7. shootmore

    shootmore Silver $$ Contributor

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    Regional match- John Martin cup, 500yards, 1st string 197-6x, 2nd string, 197-11X . The Defiance Deviant, .223 Krieger 1: 6.75 twist, 24.3gr VV N140, 90gr Sierra Match King (SMK) @ 2,789fps does well :)
     

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  8. rebs

    rebs Silver $$ Contributor

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    If I mat ask how do you measure freebore ?
     
  9. MikeMcCasland

    MikeMcCasland Gold $$ Contributor

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    You don't measure freebore on a chambered barrel; at that point you'd measure the distance to the lands using 'The Wheeler' method, or a Hornady CBTO tool; you're basically stuck with what you have, unless a smith takes a uni-throater to it. Ideally, you'll know your freebore number before you have a barrel chambered.

    Freebore is a spec on a chamber reamer that effectively determines what your distance to the lands will be. To obtain a freebore number, you can load up some dummy rounds and have a reamer created for any specific bullet/cartridge combo; the benefit of doing this is that your dummy rounds can be seated to maximize case powder capacity, and to avoid seating into areas where donuts form on cases.

    Specifically with F-T/R chamberings (either .223 or .308) it's fairly safe to rely on what you find on these forums, as most everyone is running the same bullets/projectiles. (i.e. a .169 or greater is needed for 90VLDs, 90gr SMKs, or 88gr ELDMs.)
     
  10. shootmore

    shootmore Silver $$ Contributor

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    Wikipedia does a good job of explaining it

    In firearms, freebore (also free-bore or free bore) is the forward most portion of the chamber of a rifled gun barrel. The freebore is located just forward of the chamber neck and is usually cylindrical in shape. The diameter of the freebore is always larger than the groove diameter of the gun barrel bore so that no rifling is present and projectiles used in the firearm can move in the freebore without resistance.[1]

    We usually extend free bore to move the bullet forward so the rear of the bullet moves forward of the doughnut formed in the case. That point where brass "grows", where the shoulder meets the case neck.

    upload_2019-8-26_6-31-44.jpeg
     

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