Sinclair/L.E. Wilson Micro adjust bullet seater die

Discussion in 'Reloading Forum (All Calibers)' started by Joe Marella, Aug 5, 2017.

  1. Joe Marella

    Joe Marella

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    Does anyone have experience with this die? I would appreciate your comments. Is it worth the extra $$$.

    JPM
     
  2. bloc

    bloc

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    I have no experience with that particular seater. But WOW! is it pricey!

    I use the Redding micro seating dies. They're about $100 cheaper than the Sinclair. I'm sure they seat my bullets more precisely than a standard seater but what I love about them is how easy it is to adjust them when going for a precise cartridge length (ogive or COL).

    I have some fairly accurate rifles (5 shot groups in the 0.4 - 0.7 MOA range) but I can't really claim that I saw a huge improvement in accuracy when using the micro seater over the standard one.

    Even if my rifles were far more accurate, I'm not sure I'm a good enough shot to realize any real difference the Sinclair might provide over what I already have: there are too many other variables for which the stars must align perfectly for me to get that last silly millimeter of accuracy out of my rifles.

    I'm sure there are people out there, probably some who post here, who can achieve near perfection, and maybe even have. If you are one of them, go for it.
     
  3. Tiratore

    Tiratore

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    As of 6 months ago, I have a micrometer-top Wilson TYPE die. But I used shim packs to do the fine adjustments in Wilson seating dies without the micrometers for years. Micrometer-tops make life easier when you're loading at the range fiddling with seating depth. To stay out of trouble, you still have to record the overall stem (Wilson calls it a drift) extension since this can changed for gross adjustment.

    I got the new die used. I chose not to spend the $90 premium for the adjustment feature.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2017
  4. Ares

    Ares

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    I own a few of those dies, and they have been on sale at times 40-60$ off.
    If they are worth the money is kind of a individual opinion and depending on how you reload.

    Compared to a Redding comp or a standard wilson mic. top.
    They do have accurate and truly repeatable, adjustments with audible and crisp clicks. It makes adjusting seating depth extremely easy and pleasant compared to other options.

    The mushy detentless adjustments of other options gets you close but theyre not accurate enough to get you spot on every time.

    If your used to take the time and ensure your cbto measurements are less then .001 round to round then yes they are worth the money, just by time saved alone.

    Also depending on the bullets you use, and how you set it up. might very well avoid having to mess with stem length at all after its first set up.

    The original wilson dies are a chore to keep free of rust.
    They're standard stainless seater this is less of a issue of course but not the same still.
    The sinclair/wilson one has less choice in calibers.

    And yet a custom inline seater cut with your chamber reamer is still the best thing out there.
    Too bad these are not offered as blanks too.
     
  5. Rushty

    Rushty Silver $$ Contributor

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    That's all I use now, I believe there worth the money and they are cheaper than the Redding Comp Seating Die I used to use. I find the Wilison Die easy to use and the .001" marks are very accurate. Concentricity for me has always been very good but the thing I find most helpful is the feel you have when Seating with arbor press, I seperate ammo by light, medium and heavy Seating pressure, although most of the time they are all very close and I cull out one or two heavy or light ones.

    Cheers Rushty
     
  6. avidflyer

    avidflyer Silver $$ Contributor

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    love mine.
     
  7. fgregorio

    fgregorio

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    I use a Wilson micrometer seating die coupled with a xxi century hydroseater. Also use a hornady concentricity tool. This combo allows me to monitor seating pressure and concentricity. In terms of the die, once its honed and squared, it produces almost 0 runout. Using that press allows you to adjust your reloading practices to whatever outcome you wish. If you shoot the finished rounds in order from the heaviest seating pressure to the lightest seating pressure, you will be very please with the group size improvement. Always make sure that the contact surfaces of the die with the press, ram etc are scrupulously CLEAN.
     
  8. kram

    kram

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    I use the Wilson micrometer seating die and the KN arbor press wth the force gauge. The time it has saved in less stuffing around rechecking length and shit is well worth it. There are other advantages as well. For instance, you can pick the whole thing up and take it to the range and try different seating depths as you go. Just start with jammed and work your way out couple of thou at a time if you want
     
  9. fguffey

    fguffey

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    All of my seating dies are micro adjust, any reloader that can read a height gage should be able to measure the height of the seating stem above the die, a reloader should not find it difficult to 'zero' a gage. But? I guess it is easier to purchases an expensive die than to learn how to use the one die.

    F. Guffey
     
  10. fguffey

    fguffey

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    And then there are transfers, I am the fan of standards and I am the fan of transfers.

    F. Guffey
     
  11. Richard Coody

    Richard Coody Silver $$ Contributor

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    can you define "transfers" for us?
     
  12. dkhunt14

    dkhunt14

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    This is the only reason to use a Wilson. You can feel bullets being seated with one. I also believe it gives a straighter seat. Matt
     
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  13. quest450

    quest450 Gold $$ Contributor

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    I think the OP is asking about the Sinclair/L.E. Willson Micro Adjust Bullet Seater ($199.99) not the L.E. Wilson, INC. Willson Stainless Seater ($93.13)

     
  14. fguffey

    fguffey

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    $199.99, It would pay a reloader to have a few shop skills and then there is the use of tools, a reloader with a seating die and height gage can seat bullets with precision unless he allows someone to convince him he can't.

    F. Guffey
     
  15. mikeeg02

    mikeeg02 Michael Glantz

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    They are currently on sale for 139.99. I bought one for my dasher and my 6br. I was using a redding comp seater (micrometer) and always had to seat bullets a second time or so to get the consistency I want. Now that I switched to these dies and an arbor press for bullet seating its so much more consistent, and saves a significant amount of time for me. When getting ready for a match.

    .0005" clicks are much more useful than I thought of before I bought them.
     
  16. mikeeg02

    mikeeg02 Michael Glantz

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    I didnt have trouble "finding zero". What I did have trouble with was consistency from bullet to bullet. (Measuring from base of the case to ogive). I did talk with Redding, and the fella seemed quite knowledgeable (also experienced what I had said about) and he suggested allowing the last ~1" of travel of the handle to be done by gravity, and not be forced into the stop by hand. As the cast material does in fact "give" when forced. This did shrink things up and increase consistency some for me. I still had more variance then I wanted, and I ended up purchasing an arbor press and the wilson dies. I only tolerate .0005" variation for seating depth on my comp loads. That may seem a little tedious, but thats how I do it.

    I still check every loaded round. But only have maybe 1-3 in a batch of 50 that need seated a second time. The rest are spot on.
     
  17. dkhunt14

    dkhunt14

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    That wouldn't work for me. I use way more tension then the weight of the handle would seat a bullet. Matt
     
  18. mikeeg02

    mikeeg02 Michael Glantz

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    That worked with ~.003 neck tension on my 6br, with the whole neck sized, seating 105 hybrids in a conventional press. Either way, I do not regret going to the arbor press with wilson/sinclair dies. Saves me a lot of time in the reloading room.

    EDIT: I dont even run that much neck tension any more. Basically the handle should swing loose for the final travel at the peak of the cam. I believe is how they described it.
     
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  19. hrlincoln

    hrlincoln Silver $$ Contributor

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    Reviving this 'almost zombie' thread to ask if any of you gents have ever completely removed the micrometer top to expose the innards. Wondering about care and maintenance type stuff and rust prevention...Thanks!
     
  20. mikeeg02

    mikeeg02 Michael Glantz

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    I havent pulled it apart, but the people at LE Wilson said if you cant get it back together, they will do it for you. Apparently they do it a lot. As far as cleaning goes, when things start to stick or I get more variance then I expect, I pull the top off that holds the seating stem, and push a couple dry patches through. And I am back in business. I keep mine in their box when not in use. Still look like new.
     
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