Rifle bedding again

Discussion in 'Gun Project Questions & Gunsmithing' started by Rockchuck, Feb 22, 2020.

  1. Rockchuck

    Rockchuck Gold $$ Contributor

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    I know this subject has been gone over a million times but here why go again. What are your guys recommendations on how to stress free bed a rem 700 or for that matter any action.How too and what not to do. How do you secure the action in the stock? Etc..
     
  2. teele1

    teele1 Silver $$ Contributor

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  3. CharlieNC

    CharlieNC Silver $$ Contributor

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    Look at the videos on YouTube. In particular wrap the barrel with tape just ahead of the recoil lug so that point and the tang support the barreled action with the desired clearance in between. Get cheap bolts and grind off the the head to substitute for the action screws for location. These steps provide a stress free condition for bedding. After the epoxy is added secure the action in place using a sufficient number of wraps of electrical tape, which is elastic to provide tension, along the action.
     
  4. hammerjack

    hammerjack Gold $$ Contributor

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    You can make you 2 studs that fit the holes in the stock with 1/4×28 threads on one end.
    If you use cut off bolts wrap them with blue tape to center them up in the stock.
    Let gravity hold it as the epoxy drys setting on bipods or in front and rear bags if it' a wide benchrest stock.
     
  5. butchlambert

    butchlambert Site $$ Sponsor

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    I use cigarcop and know that it is right!
     
  6. skeeljc

    skeeljc Silver $$ Contributor

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    Does a Magpul Hunter stock on a Remington 700 action need to be bedded? If so, where does the bedding compound go?
     
  7. jepp2

    jepp2 Gold $$ Contributor

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  8. pintopete

    pintopete Silver $$ Contributor

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    butchlambert and Dead Eye like this.
  9. tobnpr

    tobnpr

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    Headless studs to locate the action.
    Surgical tubing wrapped evenly length of the action. Same principle as Franklin's article with electrical tape stretched around it. Avoids point loads on the receiver that can warp it.
     
  10. PWS

    PWS Gold $$ Contributor

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    When doing full bedding jobs like all of the barrel channel and/or all of the receiver, I've come to prefer RUNNY bedding compounds like the resin offered by this outfit: https://www.ballisticstudies.com/shop/MatchGrade+Bedding+Products.html. (For a US user, you'll have to order from Nechako Distributors in Canada https://www.nechakodistributorsinternational.com/).

    Terminal Ballistics Research has a bunch of video tutorials on how to deal with such runny media since it doesn't stay put like Marine-Tex.

    The reason I like it is because it's literally like sinking the metal work into a mud puddle with lots of flow around the parts and to the outside. There's much less chance of pressure points due to trapped or pinched compound. Granted, it's messy and probably not preferable for fore-and-aft bedding jobs but works well for big fills. For what it's worth...
     
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  11. pertnear

    pertnear

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    BTW: For hunting rifles, threaded lamp tubes trimmed to length make great pillars.

    Lamp-Tubes.jpg
     
  12. Mikemontminy

    Mikemontminy Silver $$ Contributor

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    I like using threaded rod cut to length with tape wrapped around to take up any space in the pillars. This will keep action square to the stock. I also use nuts and washers on the threaded rod to draw the action down into the bedding . Then loosen them up and make sure they are not more then finger tight while the epoxy is curing. Also support the weight of the barrel up front so it doesn’t droop down and stress the action. With the threaded rod holding the stock and barrel together it makes cleanup easier then it would with tape or surgical tubing in the way. You can find 1/4x28 rod at Grainger pretty cheap. Another trick while spreading the bedding into the barrel channel is to put a couple empty .223 cases into the pillar holes to keep bedding compound from getting into pillars. Remove them before the action is dropped into the channel.
     
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  13. Rockchuck

    Rockchuck Gold $$ Contributor

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    I use the power custom bedding screws. But I use the bushings that comes with them. They help center the screw in the trigger guard holes. I use hand pressure only very lite pressure I guess more like finger pressure. Just useing them to keep the action centered thats all. Then just support the barrel with tape.
     
  14. atblis

    atblis

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    Instead of clay, I've been using casting sand to fill in under action where you don't want compound to go. Put a piece of saran wrap on the action to protect it from the casting sand as it has a little water in it. Put the action in the stock and secure it. Then flip it upside down and tightly pack the sand in all the cavities. Let the sand harden (takes a while), a little warmth helps. After that it goes like a normal bedding job. The sand cleans out easier than polymer clay. Doing this you have almost zero extra bedding compound. Post bedding cleanup is minutes with a file.

    I used to try and keep compound from going forward of the action (with a clay dam) when leaving the barrel floating, but I don't bother any more. I simply put a few layers of masking tape on the barrel just forward of the lug for a least few inches of barrel, and the let the excess flow out (only goes an inch or so forward of the lug recess). You can't see it, and the barrel doesn't contact it, so I just leave it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2020
  15. SSeal

    SSeal Gold $$ Contributor

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    A single layer of wide masking tape in the barrel channel just in front of the recoil lug will keep the overflow from sticking to the stock there.
     
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