Glue In - The Benefits?

Discussion in 'Gun Project Questions & Gunsmithing' started by Curious, May 17, 2018.

  1. Curious

    Curious

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    Guys,

    I see more and more LR benchrest shooters are now following the short range guys and opting to go down the glue in route.

    What exactly are the benefits of a glued in action?

    I appreciate the basic answer could be accuracy but how exactly does this come about?
     
  2. Dusty Stevens

    Dusty Stevens COVFEFE- Thread Derail Crew Gold $$ Contributor

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    A bolt in’s epoxy will be shrunk a bit and everytime you pull it out to look at it it gets looser. All you gotta do to prove a glue in is superior is put your stock in a vise and mount a dial indicator on the side of the action and push the barrel to the side. When a glue in gets loose its easy to tell and easy to fix
     
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  3. #40Fan

    #40Fan

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    When you sell the gun and state it being "Top Quality", you don't have to worry about the buyer taking the action out of the stock and complaining about small pin holes in the bedding. :D Glue the trigger guard screws in too.
     
  4. Alex Wheeler

    Alex Wheeler Gold $$ Contributor

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    There are no benefits, it just makes the bottom of the action ugly. LOL :D

    To be serious, its pretty simple. Why do we bed them to begin with? To ensure consistent contact between the action and stock. Because we know and un bedded action can move slightly and vary its contact with the stock shot to shot. This effects the harmonics taking place in the barreled action. Why is a glue in better? Because that variation in contact between the action and stock still happens in a bedding job, to a smaller extent. Many things can change the contact between the action and stock, hold, weather, warp, ext. The only guaranteed contact is just above the pillars. A proper glue in guarantees 100% contact day in day out every time. Does it show on target? Yes I have seen it before and after. I used to do mostly bedding jobs, now almost every build is glued/screwed. If theres a way to build a more accurate rifle, I will change my ways and do it. If accuracy is the priority its getting glued.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2018
  5. BoydAllen

    BoydAllen

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    Sometimes we just have the result of a thing and have to guess as to the mechanism. If I had to guess, it would be that it is the best way to get uniform contact and distribution of the forces that act on the action to the stock, so that the reactions of the total assembly are more uniform from shot to shot. Now I have a question for you, assuming that the action is a single shot, why would you not glue it into the stock? Have you ever owned one (a glue-in) ? I guess that is two questions.
     
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  6. Ggmac

    Ggmac Gold $$ Contributor

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    Kinda like welding ( temporarily) a part on as opposed to bolting on .
    Sorry no coffee yet !
     
  7. Cowtownup

    Cowtownup Silver $$ Contributor

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    Can you tell me how an action is glued in a stock and how it is removed? What type glue, etc...
    Thanks
     
  8. Kyle Schultz

    Kyle Schultz Gold $$ Contributor

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    Alex uses JB Weld. If it becomes necessary to separate the action from the stock, he applies heat to soften/weaken the glue to the point that they easily pull apart. Keep in mind it is typically not necessary to separate the two in order to change out the barrel or the trigger. Good luck!
     
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  9. squint-n-squeeze

    squint-n-squeeze

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    How does that work exactly? I figured usually the smith would leave the receiver on there and just poke a reamer thru the back with the whole lot spinning? With a barrel job on a glued-in receiver, do you need to have a super high precision one with known dimensions (BAT, etc)?
     
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  10. Alex Wheeler

    Alex Wheeler Gold $$ Contributor

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    Any Benchrest smith is used to dealing with a glue in and its not a problem. If the smith has notes on your action he can just send your barrel in the mail without needing the rifle at all. The barrel and trigger are removable with the action glued in.
     
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  11. HTSmith

    HTSmith Silver $$ Contributor

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    Stupid question I'm sure. I get how a barrel could be screwed on and off, but how do you change the trigger with the action glued in? All I've ever messed with are Remington 700's.
     
  12. Curious

    Curious

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    Q1 is a good one Boyd, I dont really have an answer.

    Q2 No Ive never owned a glue in before.
     
  13. Alex Wheeler

    Alex Wheeler Gold $$ Contributor

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    We dont use the 700 for competition any longer. All the popular actions now have trigger hangers. They drop out through the trigger guard.
     
  14. Eddie Harren

    Eddie Harren

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    In the old days 2 small holes were drilled through the stock, aligned with the trigger pins that hold the trigger in the action. The pins could be driven out through these holes.
     
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  15. Eddie Harren

    Eddie Harren

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    "We dont use the 700 for competition any longer."

    Speak for yourself. There are still some very good shooting Remington 700 action based, IBS Hunter Class rifles being used in competition. There are still a few records in the IBS book that were set with Remington actions.
     
  16. hoz53

    hoz53 Gold $$ Contributor

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    LOL
     
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  17. HTSmith

    HTSmith Silver $$ Contributor

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    That makes sense. thanks
     
  18. HTSmith

    HTSmith Silver $$ Contributor

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    That makes sense too. Sounds like something I would do. Appreciate the education.
     
  19. gunsandgunsmithing

    gunsandgunsmithing The best tuners and wind flags on the market Gold $$ Contributor

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    Glue ins are not permanent, as the name implies. It just takes about 10 minutes to get one out but it will very likely need to be re-bedded if it is pulled from the bedding. There really is no reason to pull an action out of a stock except to change the stock or action.

    Glue ins ensure a perfect bedding and make the two pieces whole, as in one piece. I do both glue and screw on most every rifle but especially anything bigger than a ppc or 6br. Glue ins don't fail often but they do fail on occasion and it's never going to be when you were just about to pull it apart for re-bedding anyway. It happens at a match and ends your day/trip/weekend, etc.

    I do also believe that it changes the way harmonics are managed but I've never tested this with any kind of measuring equipment to verify it, good or bad. I have seen many good bedding jobs that show evidence of some movement by polished areas on the action/bedding. I've never seen that with a glue in and logic would have it, I won't unless it partially failed.

    Fwiw, I'd rather have a perfect bedding job than to drill trigger pin holes to glue it up, unless it's a true br rig. In that case, I rarely if ever use a factory action to build on anymore for a new build.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2018
  20. SteveOak

    SteveOak

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    I wondered who the seller was. :D
     

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