Best Practice for using Iosso Bore Cleaner?

Discussion in 'Main Message Board' started by HTSmith, Apr 7, 2020.

  1. HTSmith

    HTSmith Silver $$ Contributor

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    If I had a better memory or could use the search tool more effectively, I probably wouldn't be posting this, so forgive me. I need to de-carbon the throat and first few inches of a rifle of mine. I have Isso paste and their brushes. It seems like I remember a thread where a barrel manufacturer said that using any brushes with Isso could damage a barrel? Could someone steer me to it? What is the best way to use Isso and not damage the barrel? Thanks for helping me out.
     
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  2. DaveTooley

    DaveTooley Silver $$ Contributor

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    I use it on a tight fitting patch. I start with short strokes and then lengthen to include the first 8-10" of the barrel. May take a few applications. It's good for managing heat checking also. Never use a brass brush. Even wrapping it with a patch turns it into a lap. I had a customer ruin a barrel in 255 rounds. He used it on a patched brush after every 5 shot group. That's the extreme but you get my point.

    Forum Boss: We had a guy in our club who was only getting 500-600 good rounds out of a custom barrel. Once we convinced him to stop brushing (12+ strokes back and forth) every 20 rounds and using abrasives, he was able to shoot a same-maker barrel up to 1500 rounds in matches and his average score increased.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 7, 2020
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  3. watercam

    watercam Gold $$ Contributor

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    The instructions say to use IOSSO brushes (stiff nylon). I have done that with good results. Frankly I prefer a chemical solution. Sea Foam/Kroil combo soaked overnight, Bore Tech products, etc.. Soften then follow with minimal IOSSO, JB, etc..
     
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  4. DaveTooley

    DaveTooley Silver $$ Contributor

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    I'm a firm believer in keeping up with cleaning. That means cleaning intervals are caliber specific and round count specific. And I use chemicals to start the process. Soak for a few hours, maybe over night then work on carbon and heat checking. Then address copper if it's there.
     
  5. Texas10

    Texas10 Gold $$ Contributor

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  6. hoz53

    hoz53 Gold $$ Contributor

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    ive used Iosso with a nylon brush one caliber over the caliber of rifle im cleaning. Short stroke it in problem areas. it has worked well for me.
     
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  7. HTSmith

    HTSmith Silver $$ Contributor

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    Thanks for the feedback all.
     
  8. argh

    argh

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    Google "death of a barrel" i may stand corrected, but consensus was it was the result of an abrasive cleaner used on a brush, with a cleaning rod that might not have turned as well as it should
     
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  9. Uthink Uknow

    Uthink Uknow Gold $$ Contributor

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    See Dave Tooley and Forum Boss's response above. It’s pretty much what I’ve been doing for years and I won’t blame barrel wear on the cleaning. The .30BR barrel I’m using now in successful competition has just over 5,000 rounds on it. 30BR is not a barrel burner.
     
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  10. ridgeway

    ridgeway Silver $$ Contributor

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    When I Iosso, I apply a mix of kroil/hoppes to a tight patch. I then apply a 1/4" or so dab of iosso to the patch. I apply the patch to the jag so that the iosso side goes on first. This way it don't get removed when you insert it into the bore guide. The wet patch helps agitate the iosso so it can scrub. Works for me.
     
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  11. INTJ

    INTJ Gold $$ Contributor

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    I have some questions on this. I am not meaning to challenge anyone personally, have no agenda other than gathering info, and I don't do "gotcha posts" like some like to do.

    JB on a patch wrapped bronze brush cleans very quickly. The brush will flex and give as it goes through the bore. A wrapped patch on a jag will not. So how can JB on a bronze brush cause damage while JB on a patched jag be okay? Isn't JB is non embedding regardless of how it's applied?

    Also, cleaning every five rounds is indeed excessive. In the 5/255 case that is 51 cleanings. In the typical competition life of a LR BR barrel of 1200 rounds, cleaned every 70 rounds, yields only 17-18 cleanings. I don't think that is comparable to the 5/255 scenario.

    I had just gone back to using JB vs all the chemicals. I bore scope after every cleaning and the bores look good. What should I be looking for if there is damage occurring?
     
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  12. Dusty Stevens

    Dusty Stevens COVFEFE- Thread Derail Crew Gold $$ Contributor

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    Iosso on a patch all alone is how i do it. Like mr tooley said it may take more than one application. No brushes or wrapped brushes should be used with abrasives. Lots of pictures from the barrelmakers on what happens there
     
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  13. K22

    K22

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    Before you got route of using an abrasive, I'd try Bore Tech's Carbon Remover, C4. Follow their instructions. I found it to be very effective in removing carbon. You may have to apply it a few times but it does a great job at least that's been my experience.

    However instead of a nylon brush, I use a bronze brush with their C4 because I believe the mechanical action of the bronze brush aid in faster removal of carbon. I don't use or recommend a sawing action with the brush inside the barrel. Just push it slowly through the barrel. I use 12 strokes refreshing the brush with C4 after every 4th strokes to keep the brush saturated with C4.
     
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  14. Richard Coody

    Richard Coody Gold $$ Contributor

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    I use a parker hale jag with a patch soaked in C-4 and a dab of losso smeared over the entire patch wrapped tightly around the jag. Only short.stroke the throat and about 10" up the barrel. Only periodically when my borescope shows the start of that hard carbon ring. Otherwise I use c4 and eliminator for bore cleaning.

    Hundreds of barrel cleaning tecniques. Even the experts don't agree. You have to find what works for you.
     
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  15. Martin52

    Martin52

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  16. DaveTooley

    DaveTooley Silver $$ Contributor

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    What is a lap.
    It's a dissimilar material, always softer, that is coated with an abrasive.
    Isn't that what a brass brush with any abrasive is?

    Edit; I'll add that powder fouling is an abrasive. If you push a wet patch down the bore first you can almost double the life of your brass brush.

    The barrel in question measured over .002" larger than when it was made. It went from shooting .500" at 200 yds to 4" . The finish was something I had never seen before or since. I had the barrel maker lap it to get the finish restored and shot it again. No change

    I use a brass brush with chemicals. A few passes to distribute the chemical of choice. Let it soak then a few more passes with a brush and patch it out. Then if needed I repeat. Sometimes with a different chemical. I start out with GM/Quick Silver top engine cleaner to soften the carbon.
    Chemicals and time are your friend.

    SS brushes. That has long since been proven to be detrimental to barrels. Good for smiths and barrel makers though.
     
  17. Bindi2

    Bindi2

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    I have 4 barrels heading for 5k rounds 2 at 2k+ and 2 heading for 1k all cleaned with SS brushes, brake/carby cleaner and ISSO paste as required. 30 cal and 7mm all going hard.
    As I said before if a brush damages a barrel the metal used is crap. Soft steel is very easy to work and wears out quickly you do the sums. You all prep brass sort bullets etc but who does any barrel steel home work. NONE no one, how many barrels get rejected because of bad machining or wrong metal specs. The silence is deafening.
     
  18. DaveTooley

    DaveTooley Silver $$ Contributor

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    I can trace any barrel I've ever chambered back to the mill that made the steel. That means chemical analysis and hardness. It's called Certs in the business. Very obvious YMMV
     
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  19. rwj

    rwj Gold $$ Contributor

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    Barrels made from stainless steels have different properties than those made from chrome-moly. One characteristic of importance here is that stainless alloys are more prone to galling, especially when in sliding contact with another stainless steel surface. If the contact is limited, so will be the amount of galling/wear.
     
  20. HTSmith

    HTSmith Silver $$ Contributor

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    I think trying it on a patch is going to be my safest place to start. I can't afford to ruin a $600 barrel, but I can't keep shooting it like it is. Thanks for all the feedback.
     

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