Wood/laminate clear/finish

Discussion in 'Main Message Board' started by Cory porter, Jan 10, 2019.

  1. Cory porter

    Cory porter Silver $$ Contributor

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    I picked up a benchrest rifle last night and the stock that was on it isn’t necessarily the best looking.

    It’s for a dual port panda, I’m not sure if it’s wood or laminate. I’m guessing laminate. It’s rough and seems they hurried and didn’t sand to a nice level and just sealed it in a hurry.

    I’d prefer to make it look nicer, if I need to send it somewhere so be it. If it’s easy to do I’ll give it a shot. Do I just need to follow a laminate type of procedure and sand down and then maybe use a tung oil in 5-10 coats over a couple weeks to acheieve a glass type finish. The bedding actually looks decent to me. The barrel channel is for an 1.25-.93 at the muzzle. I probably need to open it up for a large barrel
     

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  2. Cory porter

    Cory porter Silver $$ Contributor

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    .
     

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  3. fyrewall

    fyrewall

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    If it is wood, either 1/16 thick laminated wood or solid wood you might consider MINWAX Wipe-On Poly. This stuff comes in 1 16 oz. can for about $14. Gloss or satin. I have been using this for many years. It is relatively fast drying with about 12-16 hours for the first coat and about 4-5 hours for successive coats, depending on temperature. For dense surfaces having fine grains like laminates or maple, 4-5 coats will complete the job. For open grain woods like Claro walnut up to 10-12 coats are required. Between coats sand with either 320 or 400 grit, use a sanding block and preserve sharp edges. A usual job takes about 4-7 days, after the first coat 3-4 coats may be applied per day. Wait 2 days before using. The stuff is rubbed in by hand, like successive thin coats.

    If the stock has checkering clean it out with paint remover & a tooth brush. Exercising caution, a power orbital sander with 100 grit may be used to get real flat wood surfaces having no ripples, ridges or valleys - this is for the start of sanding. After that hand sanding with 150, 220, then 320 or 400.

    In addition, using care and patience, finishes may be repaired or touched up, Wipe On Poly if applied to an existing finish needs the same time to cure as a first coat. The repaired area may be blended into surrounding areas with 400 grit. Wipe on sticks to epoxy well.

    I know this might be considered a cheap non gun approved solution but the MINWAX stuff is very inexpensive, resists yellowing, durable, easy to apply, and relatively quick drying.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2019
  4. mikeeg02

    mikeeg02 Michael Glantz Gold $$ Contributor

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    Where are you located?

    I think I am getting pretty good at finishing stocks. If you're close, I can easily show you what I am doing and get you pointed in the right direction.

    EDIT: Looking at the wood, it looks like they used 1" boards of maple and walnut glued together, which is pretty common.
     
  5. Cory porter

    Cory porter Silver $$ Contributor

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    Central ohio
     
  6. mikeeg02

    mikeeg02 Michael Glantz Gold $$ Contributor

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    I sent you a pm. May be easier to talk through a few things.
     
  7. Tim s

    Tim s

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    You have a wood stock, 3 laminations. You can do this at home if you are patient and go slow.
    Unless you are familiar with and have proper equipment it rules out auto urathane, but you can get quite a nice result with cans of gloss varathane.
    First sand it down with 400-500 paper and wipe it down well.
    With varathane you must use several, light, repeat light coats and let them dry in between,it takes 4-5 coats to fill in the pores andit will then smoothout and gloss up quite nicely.
    I have done this with stocks as well as restoring Nardi steering wheels.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019
  8. lpreddick

    lpreddick Gold $$ Contributor

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    I bought 2 thumbhole laminates from Tommy Shurley and asked him how he finishes his. He said sand as smooth as you like, then use as many coats of Deft as you like, 4-0 steel wooling after each coat. After dry, wax if you wish.
     
  9. joshb

    joshb Gold $$ Contributor

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    Nice looking stock. You can give it a light sanding with 220 to take the humps out of the finish. Move to 400 for another round, then start hitting it with oil. Try to use blocks with the sandpaper, where you can. Just using your fingers to press on the paper can give you an uneven surface. You’re going to try to just sand the finish flat, not cut into the wood.
     
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  10. Cory porter

    Cory porter Silver $$ Contributor

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    Pretty much exactly my plan. Luckily I had 220 and 400 on hand and pretty much knocked out the 220 this evening. Hopefully I can get the 400 done tomorrow then decide what oil to use.

    Also may need to source a butt pad/plate. I can’t stand the bare look
     
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  11. SPJ

    SPJ Silver $$ Contributor

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    Make one out of stainless steel with a mirror polished finish
     
  12. BIG D

    BIG D

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    Cory, idk if it an optical illusion but the 4th picture looks to me like the butt end of the stock is off to the right of centerline. Looking at the pillar holes and drawing an imaginary line through the center of them it looks like the butt is strongly to the right side. Just mentioning this Incase you haven’t. It won’t track worth a darn if it is what I think it is. May not be worth all the elbow grease to finish it. Hopefully I’m just seeing things wrong.
     
  13. Texas10

    Texas10 Gold $$ Contributor

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    Cory,

    Were you able to determine what kind of finish was used on your new stock? It appears to have been sprayed and if it's automotive urethane you'll have to remove it entirely before using any kind of oil finish. I'd test an area with some acetone or lacquer thinner to see if it dulls or softens. If an uncured enamel was used, it might blister. Likely it was a spray on varnish product such as a "poly" finish or Varathane.

    A saturation finish such as tung oil or Minwax tung oil finish will not penetrate if a "sit on top" finish was used. You may have to start by stripping the old finish off and cleaning thoroughly before using a "rub in" finish.
     
  14. Cory porter

    Cory porter Silver $$ Contributor

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    I’ll have to take a better look
     
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  15. bsekf

    bsekf

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    Take a look at Min-Wax Marine Poly in the spray can. 10 light coats and "white" scotch brite between coats.

    Bill
     
  16. BIG D

    BIG D

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    Another thing you may consider with your finish is do you want to maintain the original color of the wood? Some urethane, poly, and oil finishes will give a yellowing effect. Your choice but they will yellow the finish. Some like it some don’t. I don’t unless the wood will take that yellow effect and make it look good. I personally avoid the spray can stuff. I’ve done it with these in the past and over time started to get a bunch of cracks and flaking. Didn’t overdue coats and went off directions of the product. I am a fan of the automotive clears and good hand rubbed oil finishes.
     
  17. NorCalMikie

    NorCalMikie Gold $$ Contributor

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    Had a Laminated stock that I used BC on. After a while I wanted a different finish. Sanded it smooth and had it shot with Automotive Clear. Colors jumped out that I had NEVER seen before.:eek::cool::cool: Have a couple others that got the same treatment.
    The BC acted as a filler for the Clear Coat.;)

    I have a few stocks that I've shot with Clear Poly from a spray can. No issues. Been told that the Poly will turn yellow in the Sun over time? Never had those stocks out in the Sun long enough for it to be a problem.
    A few thin coats that are sanded between the next coat gives the best results. And as always, patience IS a virtue.;)
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019

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