What is it about the H line of powders that makes them popular?

Discussion in 'Reloading Forum (All Calibers)' started by gtl1946, Jul 6, 2018.

  1. gtl1946

    gtl1946 Gold $$ Contributor

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    It appears that the “ H” line of powders are used more than all the other brands . My imagination, or true and if so why ?
     
  2. Qcredneck

    Qcredneck

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    The temp insensivity comparé to the IMR line for exemple
     
  3. shoot4fun

    shoot4fun Gold $$ Contributor

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    Maybe they are but don't look now. The new Alliant powders are making a strong bid to not only outsell but outperform the "H" powders.
    IMHO, the only thing Alliant doesn't have right now is a temp stable powder to go up against Varget. They do have, IMO, H4350 covered.
     
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  4. 22DASHER

    22DASHER Gold $$ Contributor

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    Hoping that Alliant can land a RL 16 equivalent right in the middle of H4895 and Varget!! Lets call it RL 14... Hmmm :D
     
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  5. Fotheringill

    Fotheringill

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    Other than the drop metering issue with Varget, it is the bee's knees for my rifle.
     
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  6. Ledd Slinger

    Ledd Slinger Gold $$ Contributor

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    Hodgdon was one of the first companies to design powders, their "Extreme" line, that are more resistant to temperature changes. Nowadays Alliant has come out with some temp resistant powders (RL16, RL23, RL26, RL33). IMR is now producing temp resistant powders as well with their new "Enduron" line.

    Hodgdon owns IMR and Winchester powders btw.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2018
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  7. JimSC

    JimSC

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    I have shot Varget in .204 Ruger, .223, .243, .260 Rem and .308 Win. If I was limited to one powder it would be Varget. There may be better powders for some of those but it is versatile
     
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  8. urbanrifleman

    urbanrifleman Gold $$ Contributor

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    The internet.
     
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  9. urbanrifleman

    urbanrifleman Gold $$ Contributor

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    VV will be reintroducing all of its powders with anti copper additives and extreme temp additives.
     
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  10. Alliant Reloading

    Alliant Reloading

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    22Dasher,
    Please look at AR-Comp(TM) if you have not already. It is pretty close to where you state, maybe a little closer to the 4895's, depending on the application.
    Shoot well,
    Paul
     
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  11. Alliant Reloading

    Alliant Reloading

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    Ledd Slinger,
    The only three powders we currently have on the market that are designed to deliver temp stability are AR-Comp, Reloder(R) 16 and Reloder 23. We don't claim temp stability by design with Reloder 26 and Reloder 33. Reloder 26 can be quite good at temps in many applications, but the design effect of those EI(TM) process products is outstanding P/V efficiency and high bulk density.
    Shoot well,
    Paul
     
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  12. mikegaiz

    mikegaiz Stay frosty, my friend. Silver $$ Contributor

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    consistency between batches and temperature tolerance
     
  13. dmoran

    dmoran Gold $$ Contributor

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    I sure can't say that. The H lines have been pretty bad to me there (worse then any other brands).
     
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  14. Ledd Slinger

    Ledd Slinger Gold $$ Contributor

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    Not tryng to start an argument or be offensive in any way, but perhaps you should edit the labels on the bottles. There's no doubt RL16 is the most stable of them all with the TZ technology. 23 and 26 are ok. 15 is decent. I use a lot of Alliant powders and love the performance I get from them, but the labeling on your bottles is very misleading. RL17 is the most temp sensitive of all the newer Alliant powders but states "Consistent Max velocity in extreme weather conditions". What exactly is a person supposed to think when they read that?

    I suppose RL33 doesn't state temp consistency on the bottle, but the others do. Didn't mention 15 and 17 as they are older powders.

    Heres a pic of the newest labels on the bottles. I have them all...

    20180706_152936.jpg
     
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  15. Milo 2.0

    Milo 2.0 Gold $$ Contributor

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    I'm seeing, not only in my own, but friends rifles too, RL 16 is producing some of the hardest carbon deposits I've seen. Any stability gains are wiped clean when a rifle pressures up from buildup even on cooler days. I wont even get in to lot to lot consistencies.
     
  16. mikegaiz

    mikegaiz Stay frosty, my friend. Silver $$ Contributor

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    Ford, Chevy, dodge,,,, whatever
     
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  17. Dusty Stevens

    Dusty Stevens COVFEFE Gold $$ Contributor

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    Consistent max velocity in extremes means it works in hot or very cold temps to me not stability over a range
     
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  18. K22

    K22

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    Amen - also H4895 will work in just about everything you've listed.
     
  19. Ledd Slinger

    Ledd Slinger Gold $$ Contributor

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    None of them say those exact words, but OK thats fine. Now what do all these statements mean to everyone else? Almost every bottle has a different statement.

    - RL15 says "consistent at all temperatures". That's a pretty plain statement that means to me it is resistant to any changes in the load regardless of the temperature. But according to the rep it's not one of those powders...umm ok o_O

    - RL17 says "consistent max velocity in extreme weather conditions". What the heck does 'weather' and 'max velocity' mean??? :eek: I can't change the speed of bullets coming out of my barrel unless I change my load. Does it keep the same speed regardless of humidity and barometric pressure??? Does it mean it wont slow down in cold temps but will speed up in warmer temps? Every rifle can have a different max velocity too. The statement makes no sense whatsoever.

    - RL 16 and 23 state "consistent across temperature extremes". Sounds like the same statement as RL15 with different wording to me.

    - RL26 states "excellent temperature stability". Ok, what's stability? Ignition? Speed? Accuracy? I would assume they mean speed. But again, the rep says this isn't a temp resistant powder.


    I know how they all act because I have used them all extensively in testing and all temperatures. I just don't understand why they have all these different statements on the bottles. It's ridiculous. When you see a can of Hodgdon, if it has the "Extreme" logo on the label you know it is a temp resistant powder. Plain and simple. The new IMR powders, you just look for the "Enduron Technology" logo on the label (and the screwy numbers that nobody knows by heart yet). With Allant, the only "logo" they have is the "TZ technology" on RL16. That I KNOW is a very temp stable powder. I've tested it a lot and use it in one of my hunting rifles. Why doesn't 23 have that logo?

    I know they have multiple factories making their powders and that may be the issue. Can't lock down onto one good temp stability technology when the other factory can't or won't make it the same way for them.

    Again, I really like Alliant powders and I know exactly how each one will act in many different calibers. I know I can only test loads with certain Alliant powders in the temps the rifles will be shooting or I risk a change in accuracy. But for people new to using them, the labeling can be very misleading. They may think they're buying a temperature stable or resistant powder when in fact they are not.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2018
  20. wedgy

    wedgy Gold $$ Contributor

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    On the West Coast I need my powders stable above 100F, it is 113F today, not the norm but it happens. I do hunt(pigs) and shoot above 100F and it rarely gets much below 40F when hunting so I need the higher range powders and H4350 & H1000 work for me. I haven't tried RL16 to see if is good above 100F.
     

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