What armament for prairie dogs?

Discussion in 'Varminter & Hunting Forum' started by jamesdmock, Jun 13, 2019.

  1. DirtySteve

    DirtySteve Gold $$ Contributor

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    I use a 17 WSM and a 223... Love my Savage 17 WSM.. Ok the rifle kind of sucks but is accurate and the 17 WSM is great to about 210 yards.
     
  2. D Coots

    D Coots Silver $$ Contributor

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    Hi James, how are you?

    I have 4 rifles Dan Dowling built for me in the 90's. All 700 Remington actions, Hart bbls. One mc millan stock and one widened standard stock, the other 2 factory stocks. Two of them weigh 16#. I have 3 222 Remington mags, 2 of which are tight necks, and a tight necked 22Br. I used to have a 22-250, but the BR beats it hands down. Then again, I used to have a 22-250 Improved that beats the Swift hands down. It shot a 55 gr bullet 4064fps with absolutely no pressure and the cases lasted forever, the barrel not so much. The next time
    I go I will take a bench gun and a couple of 6PPC barrels. BAT DS and Leonard stock. If I started over again I would have 22 or 6Br no turn necks because of my supply of used Benchrest 6mm bbls and a couple of no turn 223's.

    Later
    Dave
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2019
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  3. 6xcshooter

    6xcshooter

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    You can shoot prairie dogs with 22lr to 458 win mag.
    But for the best SPLATTER effect I haven’t found anything better than the 6.5 x47 lapua with a 95 gr vmax. It’s a bombshell
     
  4. SBS

    SBS Gold $$ Contributor

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    The .20 VT is a must caliber. With a 32 gr. Blitzking, it equals a .223 with a 50 Blitzking to 400 yds., both drop and wind drift. It doesn't take a big bullet and the little 32 is explosive quite a ways out. On last trip, four .20 cal. rifles and six .22 centerfires up to the .22-250 Ack. all did a good job. We'll include a couple of big 6mm's in late season hunt. The smaller calibers are more fun to shoot and watch the show. Got started on the .20 calibers much later in life than I should have. We had winds most days in the teens and 20's and still managed a high percentage, even on standing dogs.
     
  5. Mark W

    Mark W Gold $$ Contributor

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    The rifle I forgot to mention in my post above was my new 6BR Improved and it turned out to be the star of the show. I had fire form loads made up with Speer 70 TNT, Sierra 55 SBK, and Sierra 70 SBK. The 70 SBK was my favorite of the three. 200 to 300 yard dogs were easy pickings and 500 yard shots weren’t hard at all. My longest confirmed kill of the trip was 655 yards. I can’t wait to work up some loads with all of my newly formed brass!
     
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  6. Damon555

    Damon555

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    6 and 6.5 mm rifles ruled our last trip too.....the wind was howling the 4 days we shot. The smaller calibers were pretty useless past 300 yards......and most of our shooting was well past that range....We love long range prairie dog shooting but the longest shot we managed this year was just over 550 yards and that was difficult given the nautical force winds we were facing!
     
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  7. Webster

    Webster

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    I had a 6PPC. Now have a 6BR and a 6BRX. As long as I had to buy a custom barrel I would get a 6BRX. No case prep to FF, just load and shoot. Should 300-400 fps faster than a 6PPC. The 6BRX is about 150-200 fps faster than a 6BR. Same bullistics as a 6 Dasher. I shoot 58-68 gr bullets for varmints, 14 twist. You might want a faster twist for bullets 80 gr or heavier.
     
  8. jamesdmock

    jamesdmock Gold $$ Contributor

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    Dave, I guess great minds think alike.:) I, have used all of the calibers that you mentioned but used the .220 Swift more than the .22-250 IMP. I actually did not own the 22-250IMP but a good friend did and he let me shoot it. It had a fast twist and after getting dirty, it would shred the fragile bullets that we used. I am doing okay, how about you. Good shooting...James
     
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  9. 1lnbrdg

    1lnbrdg

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    Just go with Pikes and Bludgeons
     
  10. moorepower

    moorepower

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    "IF" I was limited to 3 guns, and targets were thick, i would take my Ruger 77/22/17 .17HH, My L461 .222hb and my Savage LRPV in .204. "IF" you want to shoot factory ammo, I would take my Savage Bmag, an AR in .223 and My Savage 12VLP in 6mmCM. All Hornets are very capable, especially with a 40 Vmax. "IF" you are only going to get 50-100 shots a day, I would go fast with the least wind drift such as .22-250, .220 Swift, .243, 6mmCM ect. I start small and work up.
     
  11. Mark W

    Mark W Gold $$ Contributor

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    I once left one of my guns behind when I loaded tn truck for a trip out west. It was a good thing that I had plenty of others with me. Ever since that I always double check everything.
     
  12. stosh

    stosh

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    I always took at least three rifles, My fav pdog gun is RRA 223 AR 50gr vmax shoots .5", this is good to about 400yds. Winchester 22-250 50gr vmax 3800fps, 22Hornet (great fun out to 150yds) 6x47 lapua custom for long range. My buddys shoot ruger 204 with good results.
     
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  13. urbanrifleman

    urbanrifleman

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    I was going to start my own thread to discuss my findings but this thread is right on with many of my findings. After spending the weekend shooting with David Tubb I had my entire world of shooting stuff upended. While some of this may sound like a commercial for Tubb products it is not. It's just the facts.

    Here is my Remington 700 223 Ackley. I have all these fancy guns and barrels and my main pdog rig is a modified stock Remington. The barrel is the stock 1-12 rechambered to 223 Ackley. I use a single shot follower in the mag box. I shoot the 50 tnt and 55 Varmegeddon with lt32 and LC cases at 3850. No temperature sensitivity from 75 degrees to 105. Shot the same

    In my opinion the BEST pdog rig will absolutely without fail require:
    20190811_095252.jpg
    1. A muzzle break. Must have. Period. Even for low recoil cartridges. Do yourself a favor and buy yourself a Tubb. It's insane good. The gun doesnt move. You must see YOUR HITS AND MISSES. And besides it's much more fun to see the bullet hit the target and not move. The Tubb brake is not loud either. It's really no different than no brake.
    20190811_105341.jpg

    2. Ffp scope with hold over reticle. Here is mine. It is a Leupold LRP 6.5 X 20 FFP 20190804_212038.jpg
    20190804_211805.jpg

    I posted my feelings about the absolute necessity for this type of scope and was promptly told that I was wrong. Well, I'm standing firm. This trip this weekend I shot at every magnification from 100 yards to 600 yards in cross winds and never once touched my knobs except to tweak zero. Having the hold points and ffp is next level. Will never hunt without it ever again.

    3. Scope bubble level set to gravity. You must have a bubble level and the level has to be set to the scope level to gravity. I use the roof of a house to align the reticle with gravity. How the gun is set up under the scope matters not. Only that the scope is aligned to gravity and you never pull the trigger without the bubble leveled.

    4. TUBB BIPOD AND SQUEEZE BAG. Used in conjunction with my bench (which I love and can be easily dragged like a sled long distance if need be). Using the Tubb bipod, which is more like a camera tripod mount than a bipod is power steering you can scan and slide the front of the gun and leave the rear bag in place. The Tubb bipod is asymmetrical. The legs are splayed forward and back. The legs DO NOT MOVE WHEN YOU PULL THE TRIGGER. There is nothing like it on the market and I have been hunting with a bipod for 30 years. This obsoletes all symmetrical leg designs.

    The squeeze bag replaces the traditional BENCHEST bag which clunky for hunting. The squeeze bag is so simple. It gets rock hard when compressed and vertical is easily changed by squeezing the bag. Apparently this is well know in elite special forces circles but somehow it never made it to the varmint hunters.
     

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  14. urbanrifleman

    urbanrifleman

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    Leave the big boomers at home.

    I decided that my 243 is just way too much for pdogs. A 243 without a muzzle brake is totally worthless, and one with a muzzle brake is onlu OK for seeing your hits. Larger cartridges with huge amounts of powder and overbore are much more susceptible to temperature swings IMHO. I plan on having a 6BRA for shooting the 70 grain bullets or possible the 80, and that is as big as I am ever going to take. The 6BRA is no slouch, in fact it will exceed 22-250 velocities and even 220 Swift velocities. The 6mm bullets are easier on the barrel (and hit like a Mack truck too) and the powders are faster and less temperature sensitive. When we went on the town, the ammo was 72 degrees in the truck and 110 degrees after being in the sun. Best use more efficient cartridges with stable faster powders IMHO. The 6br with a zero freebore hangs right with the very best 22-250 loads and uses faster powders that are less sentive to do it. The 6BRA EXCEEDS them.
     
  15. Pawnee Bill

    Pawnee Bill

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    When I take on a Prairie Dog town I don't go in with nothing less than a .505 Gibbs. I know it's a little overbore but sometimes one shot is all you need!!
     

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