TIG a bolt handle

Discussion in 'Advanced Gunsmithing & Engineering' started by DickE, Jan 27, 2018.

  1. DickE

    DickE

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    If a factory bolt handle is timed and primary extraction is very good, can the bolt handle be TIG welded without removal? In other words, left soldered on, then tigged in place.
     
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  2. GenePoole

    GenePoole

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    I've been called a lot of things over the years, but "welder" is not one of them. Nonetheless, my experience with TIG is that at the temperature needed to weld steel, some of the elements in solders will vaporize making a huge mess of things.
     
  3. Dans40X

    Dans40X Welder

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    A factory handle & most clones handles benefit once improved.

    Would you attempt to stick or mig weld over soft solder?

    NO.
     
  4. Egg

    Egg

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    For a good bond and no porosity you need to have the metal as clean as possible.
     
  5. Dans40X

    Dans40X Welder

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    Egg,
    Is your reply in reference to the preparation for silver brazing or TIG welding?

    Some inexperienced, have attempted the reverse -
    Fusion TIG welding a handle onto a bolt body & then attempting to silver braze or soft solder to assist their improper procedure.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2018
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  6. Egg

    Egg

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    Dans, I was refering to TIG welding. I agree with your " improper procedure" statement 100%. If your TIG welding procedures are sound ( clean rust and oil free metal along with proper joint preparation, depending on whether you have a fillet or butt joint) the weld will be stronger than your base metal and there will be no need or benefit to booger up your bolt handle with silver solder. I would also weld it with filler metal and not just fusion weld it.

    And.......I would not quench the weld, you run the risk of creating micro fractures in the weld if it cools down to quickly. Let it cool down on its own or better yet wrap it in some kind of insulated blanket so it will cool down real slow and let the molecules go back close the their natural position.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2018
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  7. butchlambert

    butchlambert Site $$ Sponsor

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    You are speaking to the MASTER!
     
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  8. ntsqd

    ntsqd

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    From a couple decades of using a TIG (GTAW) welder for building race cars I can tell you that anything present in the weld zone with a lower boiling point than the base metals is a major problem to trying to weld there. It will not work. You will make a mess.
     
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  9. Dusty Stevens

    Dusty Stevens COVFEFE- Thread Derail Crew Gold $$ Contributor

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    This one looks pretty good

    ACDD83F4-E77F-4278-9274-08B7D6115B03.jpeg
     
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  10. ntsqd

    ntsqd

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    It does. Bet it wasn't first silver-soldered in place.
     
  11. Dusty Stevens

    Dusty Stevens COVFEFE- Thread Derail Crew Gold $$ Contributor

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    No it wasnt
     
  12. carlsbad

    carlsbad Lions don't lose sleep over the opinions of sheep. Gold $$ Contributor

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    what does the other side look like?
     
  13. Dans40X

    Dans40X Welder

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    Dusty,
    Fusion TIG weld on a PT&G body & handle of which were not designed for that process.
    Not the best option.

    Carlsbad-
    Use your best educated imagination!
     
  14. Dusty Stevens

    Dusty Stevens COVFEFE- Thread Derail Crew Gold $$ Contributor

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    66F77223-9DDF-4762-9366-3E1ECCE543A7.jpeg
     
  15. boiler_house7

    boiler_house7

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    Boy That sure looks like a perty weld to me Dusty. like fine art
     
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  16. Dusty Stevens

    Dusty Stevens COVFEFE- Thread Derail Crew Gold $$ Contributor

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    Lets see what my welding QC man says @JRS
     
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  17. ntsqd

    ntsqd

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    Little bit of undercut at the one corner, if we're gonna be picky. I'm not. What are the alloys involved?
     
  18. JRS

    JRS Gold $$ Contributor

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    Looks fine. That isn't going anywhere.
     
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  19. Rustystud

    Rustystud Site $$ Sponsor

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    I have ruined a few bolts, took some lessons and advice from Dan. Now my TIG welded bolts both look good and are stronger than ever. I both recomend listening to Dan and sending him your bolt if you want it done right, at a fair price, and quickly.
    Nat Lambeth
     
  20. Downhill

    Downhill

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    Been a welder for 30 years. For proper TIG welding both surfaces have to be clean, solder between the two is not clean. The arc will melt the solder instantly and what weld you may get to stay will be loaded with porosity and contaminated with the remnants of the solder. It will load up on the tungsten causing an erratic arc. Don't try it unless you want a bad experience. Better to separate,clean everything up and use a bolt fixture to TIG it together.
     
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