Suppressor mounting

Discussion in 'Main Message Board' started by dbaird, Jan 23, 2019.

  1. dbaird

    dbaird Gold $$ Contributor

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    I have read different suggestions on screwing a suppressor on a rifle. One says use mild locktite-another teflon tape-another anti seize lube-another says to use nothing just hand tighten. So what do the experts (you guys) suggest?
     
  2. udiablo

    udiablo Silver $$ Contributor

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    I use pure nickle never-seize. Not exactly cheap, but just a little is all that's needed, so 8 or 10 ounces should last awhile..........would not suggest teflon tape since it begins to breakdown about 400F or so. You need something that will hold up well to elevated temperatures.
     
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  3. FatBoy

    FatBoy

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    I use a dab of the copper anti-sieze they use on glock frames, just to keep threads from getting torn up. If the threads are cut for a suppressor you should just need to hand tighten it.
     
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  4. gunsandgunsmithing

    gunsandgunsmithing The best tuners and wind flags on the market Gold $$ Contributor

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    The whole idea behind anti-seize is that if/when the grease is cooked off, it leaves behind an aluminum, copper, nickle, etc., plating behind that is very high temp insensitive. Unless it's on a full or MAYBE a very abused semi auto, anti-seize is seldom the BEST option for anything firearm related. A good moly or other ep grease is generally a better suited product. Contrary to its name, there are better lubes at preventing galls and thread seizing. To prevent galling upon initial installation or trial fitting of parts, it's really hard to beat most any good threading oil, such as Moly-D.
     
  5. eas1949

    eas1949

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  6. Coyotefurharvester

    Coyotefurharvester

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    Copper anti seize, hand tightened the Harvester. Torqued the Sig 556, followed factory instructions.
     
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  7. udiablo

    udiablo Silver $$ Contributor

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    The post was about suppressor mounting, IIRC.

    Don't know about how well your threading oils hold up to the high temperatures that a suppressor may see.
    But nickel anti-seize such as Loctite LB 771 is for use up to 2400F. If you prefer a non-metallic, then check the Loctite White 8036 (graphite) -- up to 2000F, or Loctite LB 8070 (graphite) -- up to 2400F. The Loctite moly paste LB 8012 is not suggested for use at such temperatures, but there are other manufacturers out there.
    For suppressor use, suggest cleaning threads very well, and then a very small amount of the anti-seize

    Had better add, that if you are installing/timing a mount for quick attachment of a suppressor, then you do not use an anti-seize. Your manufacturer will probably recommend a good cleaning of the threads (I like to use isopropyl alcohol) then a high temperature adhesive like rocksett when installing a brake or quick-detach suppressor mount.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2019
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  8. gunsandgunsmithing

    gunsandgunsmithing The best tuners and wind flags on the market Gold $$ Contributor

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    Do you honestly believe your barrel gets to anywhere near 2000 degrees? What's the temp rating for rockset?
     
  9. DaveTooley

    DaveTooley Silver $$ Contributor

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  10. savagedasher

    savagedasher

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    Hi temp synthetic wheel bearing grease
     
  11. Mikey_P

    Mikey_P sling shooter Gold $$ Contributor

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    Not sure what the ideal solution is here. But I will say that teflon tape shouldn't be used, period, as it's for tapered (pipe) threads - not straight threads. Just sayin'...

    Mike
     
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  12. spencerhenry

    spencerhenry

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    I don't use anything. Just thread it on hand tight. Never a problem, just clean the threads now and then as some barrels have more thread than others and carbon builds up on the exposed threads.
     
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  13. sambokills

    sambokills

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    My Dead Air Sandman Ti direct thread is hand tight with some grey looking anti-seize I picked up from work, used on die-casting molds for ejection pins. Anyway a little on the threads and all good. Now on my bolt guns the can never moved stays tight through what ever string of fire I put to it. On my 300blk AR 10.5" barrel or 16" barrel I can't get through a 20 round mag without it coming unscrewed. In hind sight........I should have got a QD like the Sandman S or L. Besides rim fire cans which I have the Rugged Oculus the rest of my rifle cans will be QD. And NO there is NO accuracy difference.
     
  14. flatlander

    flatlander

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    My 22RF cans are the only direct thread ones I own. All my centerfire rifles have either TBAC Compact Brake or flash suppressor mounts, or SureFire mounts. My first suppressor wsa from AAC, using their QD mounts - and I'd get a full 1 MOA POI shift every time I mounted the can, in random direction. I was incredibly fortunate to find a SOT/Class III dealer who wanted that can for his FN SCAR-17 - traded him straight across for the SureFire I have now, which has never shown random POI shift. Same goes for the TBAC CB mount cans - they're extremely consistent & accurate. I use a bronze toothbrush-style brush to clean the threads on the TBAC CB mounts periodically, never had an issue with any of the three TBAC CF cans. In this day & age, I honestly don't know why anyone would prefer to go the direct thread mount on any CF rifle.
     
  15. savagedasher

    savagedasher

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    The reason for lube is
    To stop the carbon from getting in the threads so you don’t get the threads to lock
     
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  16. JMayo

    JMayo

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    Same thing used in a muzzle loader breach plug ... Maybe ?
     
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  17. Milo 2.0

    Milo 2.0 Gold $$ Contributor

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    I use copper anti-seize, not sure if it is close to the best to use, keeps gas or carbon from getting into the threads. I loosen cans every 200 rds or so and re-apply.
    I made the mistake of leaving a Tbac ultra direct mount on too long, the can separated from the internal brake. Big PIA.
     
  18. Milo 2.0

    Milo 2.0 Gold $$ Contributor

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    I've watched vids of suppressors melting. But yeah, doubt it. But I've also watched FLIR footage and the end of the barrel with a suppressor is considerably hotter than the throat in a sustained firing rate.
     
  19. mikecockcroft

    mikecockcroft Silver $$ Contributor

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    Definitely put something on direct thread suppressor threads or you will have issues getting it off if you shoot it much and leave it on for any length of time
     
  20. Sniper338

    Sniper338

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    I use copper anti seize on all my muzzle threads. Maybe not the best but a little goes a long way. It keeps fowling and carbon from locking them on. Never had a problem

    Then I use STP, its a thick thick lube... on my barrels going into the receiver.
     

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