Started using Boretech Eliminator and.......

Discussion in 'Reloading Forum (All Calibers)' started by X-47B, May 26, 2019.

  1. X-47B

    X-47B X-III:XVI Gold $$ Contributor

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    So I started using bore tech eliminator per everyone’s advise and Cu2 and C4. Pretty impressed so far. 2 questions about it tho.

    1. It seems that the eliminator works just as well as the c2 + c4. Am I missing something? I would think the c2 and c4 should be stronger

    2. Also, I ran this stuff through 2 different Kreiger barrels, and the same thing. Blue patch after blue patch...... I don’t think both my custom barrels have some sort of problem that happen to be the same. Is it possible that the patches are turning blue off the brass jag? I would expect some blue, but patches come out very blue


    Thanks
     
  2. BP1

    BP1 Team Texas F-TR Silver $$ Contributor

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    Most of the blueing is more than likely coming from the jag..I would order a nylon jag from 21st century.
     
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  3. ngb1787

    ngb1787 Silver $$ Contributor

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    Borescope and look
     
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  4. dminn1

    dminn1

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    Eliminator will show blue if you have any brass on your cleaning rod. I use the Bore-tech proof positive rods and jags which have no brass parts. They are of good quality and seem to be holding up fine.
     
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  5. ShootDots

    ShootDots Gold $$ Contributor

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    I think you will find that Eliminator is the best of both worlds. I used to use Bore-Teck Carbon remover, followed by Montana Extreme Copper Killer. I found that Eliminator was BETTER than the Copper Killer and no less effective than the Carbon Remover.. Having said all that, to get the hard carbon out, JB or Iosso Bore Pastes are what's needed..
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2019
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  6. X-47B

    X-47B X-III:XVI Gold $$ Contributor

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    I have a borescope that I just picked up. I have 0 clue what I’m even looking for or at. How would copper show up?
     
  7. Ccrider

    Ccrider Gold $$ Contributor

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    Looks gold- streaks. Like copper.
     
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  8. ngb1787

    ngb1787 Silver $$ Contributor

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    looks, gold or yellow, kinda of dingy yellow, you will know it when u see it,
     
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  9. fyrewall

    fyrewall

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    The Bore Tech stuff contains Ethanolamine (MSDS) that reacts with copper thus blue patches. A test to determine that the brass jags would cause "blue patch after blue patch" would be to expose the brass jag to a wet patch with the Bore Tech stuff for the same time it was inside the bore, like did it turn blue? My guess is that trails of copper fouling in the barrel caused the blue patches and this would show up with a bore scope.

    We all have our ways to clean rifles - I like Gun Slick Foaming Bore Cleaner, it contains the same stuff as Bore Tech, Ethanolamine. I allow the foam that has been gushed into the barrel to remain over night to attack copper and other metals. Following that I push it out with a patch then scrub bore with nylon or bronze brush dipped in full synthetic 0-20W motor oil which is real slippery and has detergent qualities to bind and float away the black stuff dislodged by the brushing. On occasion I use JB. Carbon is next to inert and there are very few chemicals that would dissolve it without dissolving your barrel.

    What constitutes the black stuff is worthy of another discussion. Whatever don't use stainless steel brushes and wear nitrile gloves.
     
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  10. Dusty Stevens

    Dusty Stevens COVFEFE- Thread Derail Crew Gold $$ Contributor

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    Put a drop of eliminator on the top of your barrel and let it sit for a week
     
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  11. varget204

    varget204

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    You need proof positive jags,with eliminator,or butches,as brass jags will cause patches to turn blue
     
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  12. urbanrifleman

    urbanrifleman Site $$ Sponsor

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    You might have a dozen blue patches with high speed loads. That's not uncommon. The stuff works better than anything on the market, and you're just not used to it.

    I think people think their barrels are clean with other products and they really aren't. Doesn't mean they don't shoot. Just means when you start using bore tech it takes a bit to get them clean.

    You can add Tubb Dust to your powder or switch to Alliant powders. Both have decoppering agents that work quite well. People mistake the black patch of ddcoppering agent for carbon.
     
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  13. Raythemanroe

    Raythemanroe Bullet Whisperer Silver $$ Contributor

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    I use Boretech's rod and jags because they don't blue..

    Ray
     
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  14. rogn

    rogn Silver $$ Contributor

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    In my limited eperience it seems to be easy to differentiate bore copper removal from brass jag bue. Bore copper most often shows as fairly intense blue streaks which are mostly on the "outside" of the patch, where the jag blue tends to be a uniform very pale blue evenly distributed around the the patch. Little or no concentration to inner or outer surface. Jag blue tends to remain uniform thru subsequent patches hwereas the bore copper tend to diminish with each new patch.
     
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  15. jepp2

    jepp2 Gold $$ Contributor

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    How did you remove copper prior to the conversion?
     
  16. rwj

    rwj Gold $$ Contributor

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    ...what will happen?
     
  17. dkhunt14

    dkhunt14

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    The brass jag creates blue patches. I really like the more tech proof positive jags. Another nice thing about those jags is the cleaner doesn't react on the threads of the jag. Matt
     
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  18. RatRifle

    RatRifle

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    Your barrels will shoot all x's like a house of fire.

    Jim
     
  19. powderbrake

    powderbrake Gold $$ Contributor

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    I use Bore Teck C2 and C4. As to the rods, yes that brass coupler or rod tip will make it show blue. Paint the brass part to stop it showing blue. You can also add a wrap of scotch tape. I suggest the Deweys Copper Eliminator rods, jags and brushes, all aluminum parts, no brass.

    After you protect or get rid of that brass part, redo the Krieger barrels with the C2 and see how it works.
     
  20. fyrewall

    fyrewall

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    Using cleaners with Ethanolamine and nylon brushes having brass parts will clean the brass off leaving it bright. The Ethanolamine stuff (wide variety of industrial uses) is known to attack copper and brass jags contain copper. The question is how much blue color is caused by a reaction with the jag as opposed to a reaction with the copper fouling and is this important.

    Another solvent that I use is Hoppe's 9 Black, I use this stuff to clean my AR barrels instead of foam cleaners fearing the foam would expand into the gas port and gas tube. The Hoppe's 9 stuff contains both Ethanolamine and Butoxyethanol and variant. The Buto stuff (found in paint strippers) binds with metal fouling like copper, tin (copper fouling remover in powder), lead, antimony (found in primer residues) and other black stuff making it easier to remove.

    My 30 year old collection of brass jags sure looks bright and new, more so than the day I bought them.

    I follow this stuff being interested in marketing techniques.
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2019

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