Seating to the Cannelure?

Discussion in 'Reloading Forum (All Calibers)' started by musselvalley, Jun 24, 2012.

  1. musselvalley

    musselvalley

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    I am reloading a 264 mag. Nosler Part and Hornady SST. Two different OAL. Noslers don't have cannelure, all is ok. SST do. My ogive length for them makes the bullet sit slightly above the case mouth and the cannelure doesn't touch that. My question is, do I seat them ten thousandths off the ogive dimension, or push them on down to the cannelure? All the reading I've done says for more accuracy measure for the ogive and then seat accordingly. With sending down to the cannelure, it takes me to about .35 off the ogive. THOUGHTS?
     
  2. jbarnwell

    jbarnwell Site $$ Contributor

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    You do not have to seat the bullets to the cannelure, this is just a crimping groove. If you are planning on a roll crimp for the loaded round you will need to seat to the bullet cannelure. Hope this answers your question.

    Jarvis
     
  3. 284driver

    284driver Site $$ Contributor

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    I've seated my 300wsm to the cannelure with Barnes tsx and hornady sst with great accuracy. Then I've seated a 243 that deep with not so great results. I think its a matter of finding the right combo of seating depth, powder and charge, and bullet.
    With that being said, I'm guessing this is a hunting rifle so if the mag length keeps you out of the lands I would start there and not worry about cannelures and crimps.
     
  4. CaptainMal

    CaptainMal

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    Ignore that cannelure. IGNORE IT!

    It has little to nothing to do with seating depth. You need to have the tools and measure the ogive/rifle leade. Then select seating depth.

    If you can't do that, set things to magazine length and check seating by coloring the bullet with a marker and chambering it.

    That stupid cannelure disfigures bullets but was made as a crimping groove and/or way to bind the bullets' core to the jacket. It was placed as a convenient place to seat but often has little relevancy to individual rifles.
     
  5. musselvalley

    musselvalley

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    Thanks guys, looks like my original plan will work. I'm setting them off the lands!
     

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