Reloading manuals 'most accurate powder/load tested' means what?

Discussion in 'Reloading Forum (All Calibers)' started by chop house, Jul 8, 2018.

  1. chop house

    chop house Silver $$ Contributor

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    most predictable velocities, lowest sd/es, most repeatable performance, closest to predictive values, or actual group size in the test rifle? (or something else entirely?) anyone except the publishers know?
     
  2. Twicepop

    Twicepop

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    It means that of all products used under their test conditions, these particular items/products gave the most accurate results as opposed to the others used in the test. But as the saying usually goes, your results may be different. Sometimes it's a good place to start when starting out with a new caliber or changing components.
     
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  3. dgeesaman

    dgeesaman

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    Given that they aren't optimizing for seating depth, it means little to me.
     
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  4. Richard Coody

    Richard Coody Gold $$ Contributor

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    it is that rifle and barrel, primer, powder, bullet and overall length.

    used to look at that stuff. try it you might like it. after load development I have never wound up there.
     
  5. pirate ammo

    pirate ammo Guaranteed to take the wind out of their sails Gold $$ Contributor

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    manual testers only'fixed barrel lenght,fixed range
     
  6. K22

    K22

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    To me it means a starting point if you have no prior experience reloading that cartridge. It's usually a good first choice powder for that bullet. However powder amount and seating depth can vary and usually does from the published load in order to obtain the optimum for your rifle.

    Also, assuming you're using an appropriate powder for the cartridge you're loading, I've found that the single most significant component affecting group size is bullet selection.
     
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  7. 270WinDude

    270WinDude

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    Not sure myself... but my ONLY experience is with 1 manufacturers (I think Nosler) "most accurate" load tested for a 140gr bullet of theirs. Well after a lot of testing, it turns out that they are .4 grains I think away from my most accurate load for that bullet with several powder and charge combos. If it matters I think they used a 24' barrel as do I. I shot for groups in min to max range in small increments, roughly .2gr. I'm not competing otherwise barrel life would have prevented this shooting intensive method, just learning. I was pleasantly surprised when I went back to review all my manufacturers' data and saw they had reported basically my load as most accurate. Also probably just my poor shooting but with berger vlds I noticed only competitive level of difference between quite a large spectrum of seating depths. I know this isn't an answer to your question, just my experience with it.
     
  8. 2506

    2506

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    I have been in the loading game 40+ years and have worked with a bunch of different calibers and when facing a new one I sure was glad when Sierra came out with their accuracy and hunting load listing. For the average off the shelf weapon I found that these accuracy loads are pretty dang close if not right on the money as to the powder and charge weight. Changes in seating depth, case, primer can improve things. You young people don't realize that until the past 10/15 years you only had just a few options for appropriate powders for a caliber now days you might have 10 that will do almost the same thing. When I started out loading it was for economics. You could load for half or less what factory cost and minute of groundhog or deer accuracy was good enough. I started out loading 30-06 at about 14 years old with the old Lee hammer job loading set. First real loading press I used was a friends. I had not been married long and if I did not raise it or shoot or catch it we did not eat it. I lived in east NC and in the county I lived in you had to have written permission on you from land owner and be 8' off the ground in a stand to use a rifle to deer hunt. You could be on the ground with a shotgun and buck shot or slug. Through some "horse trading" I acquired a Colt 1911A1 45 ACP pistol. Old WWII bring back and it was in ruff shape. Had a friend that was in the National Guard that brought me a new barrel he "borrowed" from Uncle Sam. Another acquaintance had a Lyman 200 gr SWC bullet mold he loaned me. Got free wheel weights at the local tire shop. Made me some bullets got some Unique powder and primers and was given some cases and I was in business. I loaded up a pretty stiff load that shot good and I would hide that pistol on me go into the deep swamp/woods with my shotgun but would use the pistol and shoot deer because buck shot shells cost way more than one of my 45s. It would drill a 45 cal hole right through their chest and they did not go far. A man has to do what a man has to do to feed his family. Things sure have changed.
     
  9. chop house

    chop house Silver $$ Contributor

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    thanks for the compliment, junior. a handful of days and i;ll be 69. i still sometimes refer to my hornady second edition as a crosscheck
    ... and also regularly gig on the drums with both classic rock and blues bands playing the local circuit. it ain't just shooting that deafened me, eh?
     
  10. chop house

    chop house Silver $$ Contributor

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    excuse me, my memory failed me. it is hornady 1973 edition, sixth printing, vol II. 180709_002.jpg
     
  11. 2506

    2506

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    Yep I am your Jr. only 61. My first manual was a Speer #8 1970 edition. Man that thing has some SCARRY loads in it. Some I don't think you could get that much powder in a case. Yep, LOUD music, LOUD hotrod cars as well as gun fire have done a number on my hearing also. Good to see us "old codgers" still rock-en it.
     
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  12. chop house

    chop house Silver $$ Contributor

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    for sure, those were the days, huh?
     
  13. chop house

    chop house Silver $$ Contributor

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    well, yes, of course, but... kinda defined a term using the same term.

    the question is what criteria (not what conditions) do they use to declare most accurate? what defines 'most accurate'? is it merely and simply the smallest observed group(s)?
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2018
  14. dickn52

    dickn52 Gold $$ Contributor

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    It is limited to their barrel, their loads and powder supplies. It is a good starting point, but like everything you will have variables they have not considered. So, maybe great and maybe just a place to start a workup. HOWEVER, the maximum powder loads they mention should be observed.
     
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