Reamer lube recomendations?

Discussion in 'Gun Project Questions & Gunsmithing' started by lazyeiger, Mar 13, 2011.

  1. lazyeiger

    lazyeiger

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    Does anyone have a recomendation for a lube to use when reaming a chamber?
    Does the type of lube have any effect on reamer chatter?

    Thanks Jon
     
  2. TRECustom

    TRECustom

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    I have read some strong recommendations for several different coolant/cutting oils for chambering. I have tried a couple, and I use the Ridgid Pipe Threading oil. (Black magic) It's a little smelly, and also smokes quite a bit when turning and facing, but works good when chambering. I don't know if the cutting fluid has an effect on reamer chatter, but it makes sense that it would. Maybe a 'smith or a machinist will reply.

    Tom
     
  3. Larryh128

    Larryh128 Site $$ Contributor

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    There are quite a few good cutting fluids that work well when chambering. On stainless, I use Cool Tool because it just works great on stainless. Chrome moly, I've also used Tap Magic with good results. The stuff that really used to work great is now taboo with the EPA. Chatter is usually a spindle speed issue. A lot of the new reamers & stainless barrels like a little higher RPM than years ago so if you're seeing chatter try a little more speed 1st along with lots of cutting fluid.
     
  4. sailhertoo

    sailhertoo

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    I think Dave at PT&G recommends Casterol cutting fluid mixed with Moly D.

    I don't know what Moly D is.
     
  5. Larryh128

    Larryh128 Site $$ Contributor

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    Moly----- Disulfide. Can't spell Moly. Same stuff that you coat bullets & barrels with.
     
  6. SDWhirlwind

    SDWhirlwind Site $$ Contributor

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    Unless Dave Kiff has changed his mind or something he used to recommend Type F Automatic Transmission Fluid with his reamers and higher rpms than used yrs ago with his reamers. I have had great luck with this using his reamers and JGS reamers at 100+rpm. Have also used Tap Magic and ended up with nice finishes. Yer mileage may vary.

    Respectfully,
    Dennis
     
  7. sailhertoo

    sailhertoo

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    Whoa! I've been reaming at 190 rpm!
     
  8. SDWhirlwind

    SDWhirlwind Site $$ Contributor

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    My 100+rpm is not the maximum limit but moreso in our conversation the minimum! IIRC his reamers are M7 steel? Our conversation with less RPM was in regards to the older types of material used for reamers when many smiths cut @ 50-70rpm or so. IIRC he stated his reamers worked best on the down side of 200rpm? Was several yrs ago and I am getting older and more forgetfull. Would have to look but think the gear I chamber on with my one lathe is around my comfort level of 120, I am comfortable there and my outcome very satisfactory for me. Also I don't use a flush system which would allow considerably higher RPM's. Many ways to skin a cat though as they say. Just what I do and surely not the only way.
     
  9. Hal

    Hal

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    Re: Reamer lube recommendations?

    There is a guy that sells some chambering cutting oil called VIPER VENOM. He has a video on Utube shoing how well it sticks to the work.
    I haven't heard back any reports on how well it worked.

    Hal
     
  10. TRECustom

    TRECustom

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    Mr. Manson says he runs his reamers fast. My memory isn't good enough to quote those speeds though. Like SDWhirlwind, my comfort zone tops out at about 100 rpm. I did ream a .270 Win with a Manson reamer at 160 rpm. Several things come to mind concerning reaming rpm. I knew a top benchrest rifle builder who used 44 rpm only. No more, no less, but I have had to try different rpm's to avoid chatter. 100 rpm has worked out consistantly for me. I don't have a pressure flush system either, and worry about higher speeds dulling the reamer because of higher surface speed. Seems to me that big reamers like .338 x .378 would also have to be run slower than little ones because of the higher surface speed. Don't know that for sure, but it makes sense.

    I don't know how many ways there are to stop a reamer from chattering once it has started, but the cleaning patch has worked for me twice with 2 different reamers that chattered. One chattered at 40 rpm, and the other at 63 rpm. Changing speeds didn't stop either one of them, but once I got the cut cleaned up, the speed change apparently prevented them from starting again. I'd like to try some more of the recommended fluids, but it's hard to stop doing something that I'm used to.

    Mr. Manson and a couple of other people have told me that generally a smaller, lighter lathe will need to run at lower speeds, and a large heavy lathe can run at higher speeds. Makes sense. Mass and rigidity. A few years ago, I chambered a Walther 17-4 PH barrel for my .30 x .378. At 40 rpm, it didn't chatter, but the chamber wall finish was cloudy and rough looking, not smooth and shiny. At 63 rpm, it looked better, and at 100 rpm made a nice looking chamber. I didn't like running a reamer that big at that rpm, but it didn't dull it.

    I have more solid pilot reamers than live pilots. With the solid pilots, I would be very hesitant to try one of the light cutting oils because of a possible loss of lubrication with the solid pilot running on the land faces. With the live pilots, I don't think it would be a problem. The reamer nose and pilot bushing are so hard they should be easy to lubricate even with a very light cutting oil.

    Hope something in this novel helps. Tom
     
  11. Bnhpr

    Bnhpr

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    Jon,

    Bar and chain oil will suppress chatter. Increasing speed works also. Some machinist put a layer of wax paper over the reamer each pass to reduce chatter.

    Ben
     

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