powder for the 243 cal.?

Discussion in '6PPC, 6-6.5x47, 6XC, 6 Rem, 243' started by lonewolf5347, Jun 23, 2010.

  1. lonewolf5347

    lonewolf5347

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    I have 2 243 cal. one gun loves Noslers BT 95 @ Hornady 100 gr.HPBT grain powder of choice IMR4350 40.9
    The same gun will tack drive sierras 85 gr. HPBT seem to favor IMR 3031
    My other 243 cal. seem to shoot the Noslers 95 gr.BT excellent : Hates the Hornady 100 gr.again loaded with IMR 4350.
    I was thinking in trying a new powder
    1st>choice IMR4064
    2st> " H4350
    any pro or cons on powder
     
  2. mattri

    mattri Site $$ Contributor

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    Don't know about pros or cons but my .243 loves IMR 4064 with any bullet I load. Not saying all bullets shoot well but they all shoot the best with IMR 4064. 22" barrel 9.25 twist. Good luck, Matt.
     
  3. cliffy

    cliffy Site $$ Contributor

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    Regarding 100 grain premium bullets, about 43.4 grains of Hodgdon H4350 powder should put one at the MAX velocity regarding .243 Winnie-Pooh prowess. IMR 4350 powder burns faster than H4350, so be aware of this fact: drop back about .4 grains to duplicate H4350 performance. Faster means more instant pressure within one's barrel. I prefer slightly slower pressure build-up, but that's just me, regarding .243 Winchester power. Cliffy
     
  4. Joe O

    Joe O

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    Check the Hodgdon site for load data.I have had good results with H4831SC,H414,and WW760,out of my 243,and also the AI loads,after fireforming.
     
  5. juliomorris

    juliomorris

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    I have good results with IMR4350 with 95 and 105 grainers, but with the lighter 80's I use h4831. I also use RL25 with DTAC 115gr. I use wolf and FGMM primers with about equal results.
     
  6. .243Hitman

    .243Hitman

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    All I shoot is IMR powder, can't go wrong with it. 4064, 3031, 7828ssc. Pick one and enjoy
     
  7. WyleWD

    WyleWD

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    My 243 likes the 4064, but the 4064 is awful coarse and doesn't always drop consistent weights (at least for me it doesn't). So I'd recommend that you have your scale set up right and weigh each charge if you're using 4064, and especially if you are going to try to shoot near max loads.

    I went the easier route and found that N-550, WW760, either of the 4350's, and R-17 got more consistent drop weights and equal if not better performance. Just my experience with it. WD
     
  8. superlight93

    superlight93 Site $$ Contributor

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    Try a compressed load of IMR 4831 with Federal 210M primers. Also try seating the bullets into the lands at least .005"
     
  9. cliffy

    cliffy Site $$ Contributor

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    Scale-weighing each powder load hurts nothing, and gives a warm-fuzzy feeling of security and consistant accuracy. With some discretion, I use Alliant RL-15 powder up to 80 grain fare. From 85 to 100 grain, I prefer Hodgdon H4350, and with 105 grainers from Speer, Alliant RL-22 is my powder of choice. Powder burn-rates are truly important factors regarding developing top-performing loads. Thus far, I've not blown my head off, and intend to keep it that way. No "Tricks" are involved regarding handloading. However, one learns as one gains experience. The powders I've listed work well for my Remington 700 with 24" barrel. Always crimp your bullets. Cliffy
     
  10. LHSmith

    LHSmith Site $$ Contributor

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    [quote author=cliffy Always crimp your bullets. Cliffy
    [/quote]


    Oh boy, here we go again....another cliffyism.
     
  11. Ackman

    Ackman

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    Absolutely not true.
     
  12. superlight93

    superlight93 Site $$ Contributor

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    Bullet crimping is only necessary for pistol ammo.
     
  13. wapiti25

    wapiti25 Site $$ Contributor

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    I will not crimp for a bolt gun, may as well go to wal-mart and buy their rejects.
     
  14. wapiti25

    wapiti25 Site $$ Contributor

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    cliffy, do you neck turn Lapua brass before you crimp?
     
  15. JohnnyJohnson

    JohnnyJohnson

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    I've had very good results with 4350 in the bullet wieght you mention. But lately IMR 7828 SC seems to have done a little better
     
  16. lonewolf5347

    lonewolf5347

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    I like to ask if this is a hot load,I seem to split a case about 1/2" from the base to day at the range.
    IMR 4064 36.4
    hornady 100 gr, SPBT
    coal 2.710
    My action will close on the same bullet at 2.755
    I still was about 45 tho off the land to build excess pressure pimer were good flat but still in side the brass not pushed out.
    I shoot the same bullet same set up with IMR 4350 40.9 no problems here I wonder if IMR 4064 was near max or the brass was reloading one to many times I think about 15 reloads
     
  17. cliffy

    cliffy Site $$ Contributor

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    IMR4064 is close in burn-rate to RL-15 which I am more familiar with in .243 Winchester application. Both should work fine up to 90 grain bullet weights. Fifteen reloads may be your problem regarding split brass. At this amount of reloads, I would suggest trashing the brass or annealing it and hoping for one more shot or being thankful it went so many rounds without splitting. What brass allowed you fifteen reloads before splitting? I toss my brass after TEN reloads. Cliffy
     
  18. cliffy

    cliffy Site $$ Contributor

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    p.s. Lonewolf, for 100 grain bullets try Hodgdon H4350 or Alliant RL-19 or even RL-22. The fifteen times reloading cycle scares me, but slower-burning powders with 100 grain fare may be easier on the brass. I use Hornady brass which is very reworkable, but I never tried fifteen cycles. I recommend you don't either. Cliffy
     
  19. fdshuster

    fdshuster Site $$ Contributor

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    "I seem to split a case about 1/2" up from the base". Sounds like a typical head case seperation, not uncommon with that many reloads on 243 brass, especially if your chamber headspace may be longer then the headspace length on your loaded rounds. Other then making certain you're not pushing back the shoulders of the brass when resizing, not much you can do about head case seperation. See pages 48 & 49 in the 49 th edition of the Lyman Reloading Handbook for an excellent description and causes of head case seperation. See page 31 for experts opinion on crimping. Annealing the case necks would have nothing to do with your case head problem----- it's on the "wrong" end of the cartridge case, and in fact if the case head were annealed the results would not be pretty. ;)
     
  20. cliffy

    cliffy Site $$ Contributor

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    Another "Cliffyism" regarding crimping: crimping sets the projectile firmly into position to prevent set-back within a cartridge within a magazine, allows some slight pressure build-up before bullet release, and prevents a primer's power from moving a bullet FORWARD before the powder charge takes over. If one only fires one round with nothing in the magazine, maybe crimping is not essential, but crimping hurts NOTHING according to my experience, and MIGHT add to accuracy every time. My crimped .223 Remington 36 grain Barnes Varmint Grenades apparently appreciate being crimped, since I just put ten rounds into one hole today at "the range." Cliffy
     

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