Opinions welcome!

Discussion in 'Varminter & Hunting Forum' started by sewwhat89, Sep 16, 2006.

  1. sewwhat89

    sewwhat89

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2005
    Messages:
    238
    I am setting up my fiancee's .243 for a chance to go hunting with me at one of my stands. The range is about 400 yards. I am not worried about her ability to shoot whatever she wants to just yet, but I am worried a bit about bullet selection. Here is what I have for loads currently.

    88 gr Berger FB @ 3301 fps
    90 gr Berger BT @ 3220 fps
    87 gr VMAX @ about 3200 fps - I have not verified the exact load just yet
    85 gr NP @ 3400 fps

    Inside of 200m, she can shoot around 0.5 MOA consistently. I hope this pattern holds out to 400 yards; however, if only the Bergers or VMAX shoot well,sub MOA) at 400 yards, would you use them for double lung/heart shots? Keep in mind, shoulders some times get in the way of a bullet. Do you think any of these bullets,other than the NP) can bust shoulders at 400 if need be.

    FWIW, I am in E TX, and 200 yards is long range. 400 yards is almost a mile isn't it? ,that was a joke!)
     
  2. chino1969

    chino1969

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    Oct 6, 2005
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    sewwhat89,
    Wow, that's a tall order for a .243. If you were keeping your range to 200 yds. max., I would say that you would be fine with the 87 grn. V-Max and the Nosler Partition. I personally think that 400 yds. is a bit much, particularly if the bullet hits some bone. This is just an educated guess based on years of shooting and hunting.
    Regards,
    Chino69
     
  3. sewwhat89

    sewwhat89

    Joined:
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    All of the bullets will still carry over 1k energy at 400 yards. That is plenty to break bones if the bullets hold up. That is the only question here if anyone thinks the bullets will expand and hold up. I've seen two does killed at 330 yards with a neck shot and quartering away shots with 80 gr Speer HotCor bullets. Both dropped, but the quartering away shot did not exit, but broke the oft-side shoulder. Now I am stretching the distance a bit more with higher bc bullets loaded at comparable velocity to the 80 gr previously mentioned,3300 fps). I have better designed bullets, but are they better constructed or not, I have no clue.

    I have recovered Berger bullets fired at 200m into red clay, but they were all pancaked to the base just like the Hormady VMAX and AMAX are. I am going to test all these at the range from 400 yards and see what I can find. I know red clay is not the same as a deer; however, its the best I got and will give me some idea.

    Thanks Chino, time will tell at the range what happens. I am leary of the NP because of its bc and the range involved. The Bergers have 40% less wind drift.
     
  4. chino1969

    chino1969

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    sewwhat89,
    Yeah, like I said my opinion was kind of an educated guess. You're doing the right thing by testing at the distances you intend to be shooting. It never fails to amaze me of the number of people that are out there hunting that don't take the time to experiment with their rifle, load, shooting positions, etc. You are a much better hunter if you take the time to know your equipment.
    Regards,
    Chino69
     
  5. AckleymanII

    AckleymanII Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    May 11, 2006
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    2,634
    My step brother's nephew shot a 200 lb buck in Kansas last year at 320 yards with a 700 in 243 shooting the following load:
    Rem brass
    Win standard primer
    100g Hornady BTSP
    42.3g of H4350

    The deer was facing the shooter at a quartering angle. The bullet broke the right front shoulder and ended up under the hide in the center of the rib cage on the off side. The deer did not run off at the bullet's impact.

    None of the bullets that you mentioned are what I would consider a deer bullet with the exception of the 85g Partition. I shot 3 boxes of these bullets and could not get them to group and gave up. I have had good luck with the 95g partiton with 42-43g of IMR 4350 in the past.

    If you are wanting to shoot a lighter bullet, then consider the 85g tripple shock, it is a very accurate bullet in a buddy's rifle and it does a great job on deer that he has killed with it.

    Good luck!
     
  6. halfmile

    halfmile

    Joined:
    May 19, 2006
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    Being in Wisconsin, I don't get that kind of shooting, but I swear by Sierra Game Kings, and in this case would use 90 or 87 grains, whatever they come in. As fast as I can make them go. You only have to be able to hit a pie plate to kill a deer.

    I would use neck sized cases and make sure they cycle smoothly, depending on the gun you might get them up to a little more velocity. But that's hair splitting. FL sizing will ensure proper feeding. Your call.
     
  7. cntryboy1289

    cntryboy1289

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    I second the post on the 85g TSX Barnes bullets. They will carry more weight after the hit to deliver more of the bullets energy and does it very accurately. I load them in my .243 loads and have taken several deer with them. I will say this though, even a very good shot at this range can be a dicey shot on a deer with the .243 bullet in the weight you are thinking about using. I would defintely have to go with the Barnes just to make sure the bullet stays together and doesn't just break apart on you.

    I also load the Combined Technologies 95gr Ballistic Silvertip's and have very good results using them as well. These bullets hold up very well and the ballistic tip helps when you need to reach out there.
     
  8. M700

    M700

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2005
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    Have cleanly taken mulies with a 95 grain Nosler Ballistic tip from a 6mm Remington at 300 yards or so. Expansion and penetration were both excellent. I think these little cartridges though, the .243 Win and the 6mm Rem, are getting close to the edge for dependable performance on big deer at the 400 yard mark... Velocity is slowing quite a bit by then, and that's really about all they've got in the first place, certainly not much bullet weight.

    I'd be thinking in terms of the 95 - 105 grain hunting bullets rather than the 85 grain class for deer at 400 yards. With good shot placement though, she'll be fine!

    Regards, Guy
     

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