not Wiley enough

Discussion in 'Varminter & Hunting Forum' started by Toby Bradshaw, Mar 22, 2016.

  1. Toby Bradshaw

    Toby Bradshaw Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    777
    My Wildfire remote doesn't have letter codes, just numbers. Calls that have brought in coyotes to my stands, in roughly descending order of success:

    006 coy pup dist 3
    029 nutty nuthatch
    017 lightning jack
    021 adult cottontail
    020 bay bee cottntl
    022 vole squeaks
    003 fem coy deep hwls

    Really, a low volume sound (vole squeaks), a medium volume (nutty nuthatch, bay bee cottntl), and a loud (lightning jack, adult cottontail, coy pup dist 3) will get the job done most of the time, IF the coyotes are going to come at all. I've gotten a few coyotes, which were barking at me, to show themselves by playing fem coy chall, but usually if they are barking or howling at you, you're done.
     
    WyleWD likes this.
  2. Toby Bradshaw

    Toby Bradshaw Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    777
    We've been having a minor heat wave the past couple of weeks, so no time to fly the hawks and call coyotes before it gets too hot.

    Blitzen and Xenon on her second jack.JPG

    But this morning I gave the hawks the day off after they gorged on jackrabbit yesterday, so I packed up the new Kelbly Atlas Tactical 22BR and went looking for coyotes.

    It was nice and cool (48F), with no wind, when I set up my first stand 30 minutes before sunrise in the sagebrush/rabbitbrush/greasewood adjacent to an alfalfa pivot where I have seen quite a few coyotes lately. Within a few minutes of calling (FoxPro "nutty nuthatch") I had a coyote barking at me from 100-150 yards away. I turned the scope up to 10X and scanned for the coyote, but couldn't locate it in the thick greasewood. The coyote was on the move to the west, and clearly didn't intend to stop or come to the call.

    I packed up and drove 3 miles to another spot where I have been running my dogs, and where there was a reasonable quantity of fresh coyote scat and tracks. Pulling into my parking spot I saw a coyote run out of the alfalfa pivot, across the 2-track, and into the sage. I set up my "stand-up-stand" in a patch of tall sage at the edge of a more open area of short, sparse greasewood.

    Atlas tactical coyote rifle in situ.JPG

    I started softly with nutty nuthatch in case there was a coyote close by. Nothing showed up in the first couple of minutes, so I cranked up the volume. No go. I tried lightning jack (the loudest prey sound I have), but nobody was interested. Of course, no stand is complete without pup distress, and on the second cycle a coyote appeared at the edge of the opening about 275 yards out. Often coyotes will charge the call when playing pup distress, but this coyote was in no hurry. He kept small greasewood bushes between him and me, sticking his head around each bush to locate the source of the sound. When he stopped, facing me, 199 yards out, with just his head, neck, and top of chest showing, I decided not to wait any longer. I heard the 40gr NBT impact, and down he went. The bullet entered just to the right of center on his chest, breaking his left front leg and making a mess of his thoracic cavity. An adult male in his prime.

    coyote kill 39.JPG
     
    thekriebles, snert and DirtySteve like this.
  3. Toby Bradshaw

    Toby Bradshaw Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    777
    When my hawks caught a jackrabbit a couple of days ago, a coyote pup was attracted by the screaming and kept stalking me and my hawks for about 30 minutes afterwards. Time to thin the coyote herd a bit ...

    I was hunting a juniper-sagebrush savanna with some rock outcrops. Not as much coyote sign as in the valley below, but enough to indicate that I might be able to call one in. My first stand was on the side of a basalt scree slope looking over the savanna. FoxPro adult cottontail, lightning jack, pup distress -- zip. I played some yip-howls and got responses from 2 packs of coyotes, so they were around.

    I walked about 3/4 mile to another rock outcrop. Nutty nuthatch, lightning jack, pup distress. Skunked again.

    By now the sun was well up, about 55F, but still no wind. I hiked another 3/4 mile to a fenceline at the edge of the savanna, with a gentle slope to the valley below. I set up my 22BR on my tall Bog-Pod in the shade of a juniper to provide some concealment. After about 5 minutes, I caught a movement to my left. A small-ish coyote was trotting towards the call, stopping every few yards. When she was 125 yards out, she paused, quartering towards me, downhill. The 40gr Nosler Ballistic Tip was going about 3500 ft/sec when it impacted just above her right elbow, then continued down and back, blowing out the bottom of her thoracic cavity and ripping the diaphragm open.

    coyote kill 40 with Atlas.JPG

    coyote kill 40.JPG
     
  4. Greg Taylor

    Greg Taylor Site $$ Sponsor

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2005
    Messages:
    741
    This thread is wonderful!
     
    snert likes this.
  5. Toby Bradshaw

    Toby Bradshaw Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    777
    A couple of days ago I missed a coyote at a little more than 50 yards. It was moving, but not much. Thinking that maybe I had knocked the scope somehow, I drove to the local "rifle range", went out to the 100-yard position and put up a paper plate that someone had left (conveniently marked with a black dot!), walked back to the "bench", and put my 22BR over my backpack padded with a rolled-up towel. Three shots later:

    Atlas tactical 22BR verifying zero -- 100yd over a rolled-up towel.JPG

    Hmmm. I guess I'll have to chalk up that missed coyote to operator error. :(

    I had time for one quick stand this morning. The place is much more open than usual for around here, so I shortened the legs on my Bog-Pod and sat down for a change. "Bay bee cottontail" didn't do the trick, but isn't very loud, so I ramped it up to "adult cottontail". That got the attention of 3 pronghorns bedded down in the alfalfa pivot below. They stood up, making that wheezing/coughing sound that indicates they are alarmed. About the same time they pranced out of the pivot, still huffing and puffing, I saw a coyote leaving the sagebrush about 400 yards out, headed my way along the fenceline. She wasn't running but was definitely intent on the call. When she got abeam of the caller, she turned towards me from the fenceline at 125 yards. She was quartering slightly to my right, walking slowly. I meant to hit her in the chest inside her right front leg, but her movement (or my bad shooting) put the 40gr Nosler BT a little far back on her right side, 3 ribs forward of her diaphragm. The bullet clipped the back of her right lung, made pateĀ“ of her liver, and exited her flank, hosing the inside of her left rear leg with blood. She spun a couple of times and was wobbling in place, but I put a finisher in her just to be on the safe side. Looks like this year's pup, or possibly a yearling.

    coyote kill 41 with Atlas tactical.JPG

    coyote kill 41.JPG
    The hawks had a good day, too, catching 3 jackrabbits.

    Blitzen on jack 4.JPG
     
    thekriebles likes this.
  6. Toby Bradshaw

    Toby Bradshaw Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    777
    I was driving home from my morning hawking excursion, and spotted what I thought was the back of coyote poking out of the alfalfa. I backed down the road, pulled off into the sagebrush, got my 22BR and Bog-Pod, and sneaked up on the alfalfa field. It turned out that what I saw wasn't a short coyote in tall alfalfa, but a boar badger shuffling along looking for gopher holes to mine. The damage that a badger's digging can do to the pivot irrigator wheels is serious, so the local farmers treat badgers like the SEALs treated Osama Bin Laden. The 40gr Nosler Ballistic Tip was whistling along at about 3600 ft/sec when it whomped into the badger at 100 yards. The sound of the impact was impressive, and when I picked him up there was considerable sloshing in the chest cavity, with no exit wound.

    badger on Tacoma tailgate.JPG
    badger with Atlas Tactical.JPG
    badger head closeup.JPG
     
    thekriebles, JFM33 and JLT like this.
  7. JLT

    JLT Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2014
    Messages:
    534
    Nice looking badger! Looks like he's half way across your tailgate - pretty good-sized, too. Nice shot.
     
  8. brians356

    brians356 Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2013
    Messages:
    2,735
    Wow, deja vu all over again. Long ago I did some varminting on my way from Reno to N. Idaho. Stopping in Jordan Valley, OR, I asked a guy in one of the two gas stations for some leads. He gave me the phone number for a rancher about 20 miles NW of town, out in some pothole scablands. I called him and he invited me to shoot ground squirrels and rock chucks. It was already late in the day, so I slept in the back of my pickup a mile from his house, and drove in at dawn. While perched above a field, popping a few squirrels, I saw a strange fat creature carousing around in the grass. I wasn't quite sure what it was, but it sure wasn't livestock or a domestic pet, so I shot it from about 80 yards with a 40-gr Ballistic Tip from my 223 Rem. It thwacked and the creature slumped motionless. Upon inspection, it was (surprise!) a badger, the only one I've ever laid eyes on. The 40 BT entered just behind the shoulder joint and never exited.

    PS I see tanned badger pelts sell for $80 to $350. Wish I'd known that, I left it where I shot it. Of course properly dressing, preserving, and tanning a pelt constitutes considerable value add.
    -
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2017 at 4:22 PM
  9. Andy W

    Andy W

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2015
    Messages:
    21
    Great thread. Thanks for sharing!
     

Share This Page