Not Wile E. enough

Discussion in 'Varminter & Hunting Forum' started by Toby Bradshaw, Mar 22, 2016.

  1. CT10ring

    CT10ring Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2008
    Messages:
    1,197
    Toby, great to read all. keep it going!
     
  2. helmut in the bush

    helmut in the bush

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2016
    Messages:
    91
  3. centerlineseal

    centerlineseal

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2015
    Messages:
    231
  4. Shoebox

    Shoebox

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2016
    Messages:
    259
    received_1076324915825194.jpeg received_659624107769174.jpeg received_2247979252195889.jpeg a few dingo's from Queensland Australia 22-250 - 55 SBT, not coyote's but I though you might like a look !
    Great thread !!
     
    allen529, 370bc, Bc'z and 5 others like this.
  5. helmut in the bush

    helmut in the bush

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2016
    Messages:
    91
  6. Lone Hunter

    Lone Hunter Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2009
    Messages:
    671
    That's what I thought until I read where he got them. I figured they were feral dogs which I guess they actually are. Shoebox, how aggressive are they??
     
  7. Shoebox

    Shoebox

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2016
    Messages:
    259
    The two at top are pure dingo's.
    Two in center are cross dingo and wild dogs .
    Pure dingo's are black & tan or red as in top photo ,
    Dingo have been known to attack people but usually shy of people
    They are a formidable hunter an killer, very smart, fast with great endurance & heat tolerances
    A big dingo could weigh 30 KGS
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2019
    allen529 and Jesse Gietzen like this.
  8. Toby Bradshaw

    Toby Bradshaw Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    1,273
    It's a down year for coyotes in my part of the NW Great Basin, probably due to it being the bottom (I hope) of the jackrabbit population cycle. The coyotes that I have seen are nearly all pups, so at least the coyotes had a decent breeding season.

    My hawks have been getting their share of the few remaining jackrabbits, but it has been too warm this month to call coyotes and hunt with the hawks on the same day.

    Comet with her big jack.JPG

    I gave the hawks this morning off to finish digesting yesterday's jackrabbits. I was standing in the sagebrush with my 22BR 30 minutes before sunrise with the Lucky Duck Revolt deployed 50 yards out in a relatively open spot. Four minutes into "shelterbelt" (a cottontail distress sound) this little pup trotted right up to the caller. At such close range the 40gr NBT is still going almost 4000fps, so the damage was ... extensive. I chose a camera angle that doesn't show the foot-long opening in her abdomen.

    coyote kill 81.JPG
     
    BRGUY, Shoebox and krumfola like this.
  9. sw282

    sw282

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2018
    Messages:
    129
    Toby, l have hunted your Great Basin in the southern part around Goose Lake 0r on the Cali/0r border.. Was there first week of April 2003 shooting Ground Squirrels. Shot them in the Snow too.. Quite an impressive RED blood trail on White snow shooting a Ruger 77 in 17HMR.. Having traversed the state of 0regon to get there from Portland l can say its some of the most beautiful parts of this country l have seen.. Didn't see any yotes on my trip to Goose Lake.. l did hear quite a few while there tho... l did meet a most lmpressive Bird there. Golden Eagles like a free meal as well as anyone... They don't seem to be afraid of anything or anyone... They came within 50-60 yds of me while l was shooting to feast on a little fresh meat. Those things are HUGE!
    l just love 40gr Nosler Ballistic Tips.. While they aren't as explosive as VMAX 40s they fly better and shoot flatter.. Their boat tail design gives them a higher BC and their thick solid base gives them much deeper penetration than a 40gr VMAX.. For coyotes the Nos 40gr BT is big medicine.. l killed a Badger in WYOMING some years back while shooting Prairie Dogs.. He came out of a PD hole with his head held HIGH. He took a 40gr on the chin @3600fps from my Model 70 Winchester Coyote in 223Rem... He almost lost his HEAD over that Ballistic Tip!!
     
    BRGUY likes this.
  10. Toby Bradshaw

    Toby Bradshaw Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    1,273
    After 3 straight days of rain the coyotes were hungry this morning. There was a solid overcast with a pre-dawn temperature of 37F, so prospects seemed good for making multiple stands. I started before sunup in an area where I have been hearing a lot of pups howling every evening. I like to use higher-pitched prey sounds at this time of year to entice those timid pups. I played "luckypecker" (a bird distress sound) on the Revolt for 8 minutes, raising the volume from 10 to 25 over that time, then I switched to "shelterbelt" (a cottontail distress sound). Four minutes later this female pup walked into the clearing. I muted the caller and she stopped right on cue -- behind a rabbitbrush. I resumed calling and she walked straight towards the Revolt. Before she could spook from my scent I turned loose a 40gr NBT from the 22BR. At 78 paces the bullet broke the near leg, destroyed the chest cavity, and broke the offside leg on exit. In the photo you can see how close she was to the Revolt.

    IMG_1657.JPG

    I moved a mile north and played the same sequence with the same result, this time in 14 minutes instead of 12, and 88 paces instead of 78. A pretty yearling female.

    coyote kill 83.JPG

    "Shelterbelt" has been an amazingly productive sound for me. Thanks, Rick Paillet!
     
    WyleWD and DirtySteve like this.
  11. Toby Bradshaw

    Toby Bradshaw Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    1,273
    Yesterday was windy, so I knew the coyotes would be hungry today when the wind died down. Morning temperatures have been in the mid-teens, further stimulating their appetites. Nearly all of the hay fields are swathed and baled now, finally making it possible for me to see the coyotes out in the pivots.

    I spotted a reddish pup out mousing at the edge of a pivot. Rather than try to call it from the adjacent sagebrush, I drove around for an hour checking out other pivots. I saw about a half dozen coyotes.

    When I got back to the first pivot the coyote was nowhere in sight, so I parked my truck and sneaked about 150 yards into the sagebrush next to the hayfield. I had the 10mph northeast wind in my face. I didn't go too far into the sagebrush because I didn't want to leave room for the coyote to downwind me without leaving cover. (Coyotes prefer not to circle in the open.)

    I expected the coyote to be somewhere nearby, so I started with a soft sound (kangaroo rat) at low volume (8 out of 32) on the Lucky Duck Revolt. One minute and 20 seconds later this female pup walked right up to the caller at 62 paces, with the wind at her back. The 22BR launched a 40gr Nosler Ballistic Tip at 4100fps. She never knew what hit her. You can see how close she came to the caller.

    This stand was a good reminder to approach quietly, because coyotes are often closer than you think.

    coyote kill 84 with Revolt.JPG

    coyote kill 84.JPG
     
    DirtySteve and BRGUY like this.
  12. Toby Bradshaw

    Toby Bradshaw Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    1,273
    Yesterday evening was atypically calm, but I didn't get my act together in time to make a stand before sunset. So, after the hawks had caught their jackrabbits this morning, I went looking for coyotes to try to make up for last night's mistake. I drove past 4 coyotes in pivots, so I knew they were on the prowl. I set up at an abandoned farmhouse with an open field full of Jim Hill mustard and tumbleweed, adjacent to several square miles of sagebrush and greasewood. I was hoping that a coyote would leave the sagebrush and give me an open shot as it approached the caller in the weeds. But, knowing coyote behavior, I had my rifle pointed at the fenceline separating the sagebrush from the weedy field.

    Sure enough, 10 minutes into "shelterbelt" (cottontail distress), this yearling male appeared at the fenceline 122 yards away, facing me. He didn't seem inclined to cross the opening, so I held for the center of his chest but hit slightly to the left, breaking his right leg and dropping him on the spot. No exit wound. You can see a fence wire in the photo.

    coyote kill 85.jpg
     
    krumfola, BRGUY and Shoebox like this.
  13. krumfola

    krumfola Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2010
    Messages:
    134
    What are you calling a "pivot"?
     
  14. shb

    shb Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2017
    Messages:
    61

    center-pivot-irrigated-fields.jpg
     
    krumfola likes this.
  15. shb

    shb Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2017
    Messages:
    61
    easier_on_you_img.jpg
     
    krumfola likes this.
  16. krumfola

    krumfola Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2010
    Messages:
    134
    I never would’ve guess that, thanks for the pics.
     
  17. Toby Bradshaw

    Toby Bradshaw Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    1,273
    It's been single-digit cold for the past several mornings, with no wind -- perfect for a little coyote calling. On my first stand I had a pup come straight to the call within 3 minutes. I whooped to stop it before it got to the call and caught my scent, but it stopped behind a sagebrush. I blipped the call again and the coyote charged the call, winded me, and trotted off. I managed to stop it again about 150 yards out, with only its head and neck showing, but muffed the shot.

    On the second stand I tried "luckypecker" on the Revolt for about 5 minutes, then switched to "shelterbelt". A few minutes later I spotted a coyote standing a little over 100 yards away, looking in the direction of the caller, but unwilling to commit. Usually that means an older, experienced, more wary coyote. It didn't stick around long enough for a shot, but trotted right to left into the sagebrush.

    I changed the sound to "stinky rat" rodent sounds to see if I could coax the coyote into giving me another look. I picked him up again, but now he was farther out (183 yards, measured after the fact), standing broadside. I was having a hard time getting a steady hold from my standing position, even with the Bog-Pod, and at 3.5x magnification on the Leupold scope I didn't have much resolution (nor did I have time to zoom in). I did my best to settle the crosshairs behind his shoulder when the Jewell trigger broke.

    I heard the unmistakable sound of a chest cavity hit. I found a chunk of lung and a spray of blood at the impact site. This handsome furred-up adult male was piled up 50 yards from where he was shot. You can see the entrance wound from the 40gr NBT -- a little far back, but close enough!

    coyote kill 86.jpg
     
    BRGUY and sw282 like this.
  18. boltfluter

    boltfluter Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2012
    Messages:
    2,877
    Toby,

    That is one tough coyote to make it 50 yrds after a hit like that. Tough critters to say the least!

    Paul
     
  19. Toby Bradshaw

    Toby Bradshaw Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    1,273
    Ain't that the truth! Impressive animals.
     
  20. brians356

    brians356 Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2013
    Messages:
    3,574
    You must not live out west. Some folks look down from a window seat and exclaim "Look, Martha! Crop circles!"
    -
     
    Bc'z likes this.

Share This Page