New here and need guidance on Jaeger built 22-250

Discussion in 'Small Stuff--22s, 20s, and 17s' started by Grapevine, Jul 31, 2019.

  1. Grapevine

    Grapevine

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    Looked with Borescope. For about 1 1/2” beyond chamber it looks like charred wood, assume this is what they call fire cracking , guessing this is not a good thing. Found several dark patches of pitting and still some streaks of dark (carbon?) in the grooves. Didn’t see any copper. What are my options at this point?
     
  2. swd

    swd Gold $$ Contributor

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    Get all the carbon out that you can. They can still shoot pretty good with some fire cracking. 1.5” down isn’t really all that far depending on how severe it is. If it still won’t shoot a barrel would be the next option.
     
  3. chuckshooter

    chuckshooter Silver $$ Contributor

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    It's very difficult to get the carbon out of the fire cracking. The goal now should be to clean enough to see the wear or corrosion clearly. Then look at all the bore from both ends slowly and carefully, it will take some time. As has been said, it doesn't have to be perfect to still shoot, but at least you will know what you are dealing with. Don't forget to look at the crown. Last thing, it's just a barrel, they are a consumable. A new high quality one maybe in your near future. Good luck
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2019
  4. joshb

    joshb Gold $$ Contributor

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    22-250’s are fun but they are barrel burners. If that barrel is toast, think about a rebarrel in 6br. They shoot great and last longer.
     
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  5. Bill K

    Bill K Silver $$ Contributor

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    How about along with a good bore cleaning, have you gun smith check the crown. Sitting and banging around over the years it could be damaged enough to cause the poor grouping.
    Try some loads with both H380 and CFE 223 powder and a good 55 grain bullet and see if it does not improve.
     
  6. littlebuddybr

    littlebuddybr Gold $$ Contributor

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    Don't underestimate the 50 and 55gr ballistic tip. They have shot well in a pile o 22-250's.
    I have made my 2 longest chuck kills with the 55gr ballistic tip. It was way past where a 55gr should be stretched too.

    Varget is a very good and consistent powder in the 22-250 with that weight class bullet.
    But, becareful when changing lots of varget, they vary a bit.

    1.5" of throat wear in a 22-250 is not good.
    When the throat starts to go on a 22-250 they go quick. You will probably find by the time you think you found a load and process to clean it. It will be shot out.
    Also you will have wasted a lot of time, powder, primers,and bullets.

    But, you can certainly do it for the learning experience. I did. A long long time ago.

    Btw, if you want to make a 22-250 last?
    There should be a node around 33.5 grains of varget with a 52gr smk and touching the lands. This load will get it to last.
     
  7. Grapevine

    Grapevine

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    I won’t be shooting this rifle a bunch. I only shoot paper maybe once a month or so. But when I do get to shoot I’m a little anal about group size so I tinker a lot with matching loads to guns. Sort of a quest with each Rifle I get but I enjoy the he** out of it. In this “package” of guns I got from him , I also received Browning Safari’s in .222 rem. and .243 (both Sako builds) and another Mauser in .257 Roberts. All have the same rust/ pitting issue. Starting with the 22-250 as it seems to be in the worst shape but am going to line them up and let them soak with Kroil oil in the bore. Placed an order with Brownell’s today to get supplies to start scrubbing and cleaning all. I’m a little scared of the chemical treatments because of risk to blueing.
     
  8. Bigguy1951

    Bigguy1951

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    Wipeout won't hurt the bores or the bluing on any of those rifles. I still highly recommend that you use some carbon removal chem. Keep all your chemicals off of the stock as most will remove the finish. Good luck, sounds like you are having fun.
     
  9. Grapevine

    Grapevine

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    Already learned the lesson about wipeout on stock, the hard way. Was going to redo anyway. That only removes copper, right? How about carbon and rust?
     
  10. Grapevine

    Grapevine

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    What do you guys know about salt stocks? The Browning .243 has a rust line where barrel touches stock but only along the top of the stock, not on the lug or lower receiver. I gouged the wood in the barrel channel and applied some silver nitrate but got no reaction. This gun is dated only a year before that started up (1958?) . Suspected salt but not confirmed. Maybe just put away with moisture wicking in the gap. Gun shoots great, under an inch at 100. On a whim the day I shot it I held over what was printed on ammo box and hit a 10” plate at 300 yards. Was shocked . Fun times.
     
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  11. Rdlningcltchdmpr

    Rdlningcltchdmpr Silver $$ Contributor

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    I just discovered rem.40x bore cleaner. This stuff is excellent. It's a very fine abrasive in an oil base. Use it after bronze bore brush. It works great but only use it once in a while.
     
  12. swd

    swd Gold $$ Contributor

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    Is the bottom of the action rusted? If not it's probably not a salt stock. All the salt stocks I've seen had moderately to severely rusted metal.
     
  13. Grapevine

    Grapevine

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    Only small specks in bottom of receiver and lug. Normal stuff for gun this old.
     
  14. Grapevine

    Grapevine

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    I finally got some time to work on the Jaeger and have an update. I spent a lot of time running bore cleaners and soaking with Kroil oil. Then spent several sessions lapping with J&B compound. I had noticed some pitting at the end of muzzle at the crown so I ordered an 11 degree crown cutter from Brownells when I ordered the compound and other supplies to try and get this thing to shoot. Finally finished and went to range today. It still won’t group factory stuff well , but, I loaded 10 rounds 52 SMK with 34.9 GRS. Of RL15. HOLY COW ! I can cover 4 out of 5 shots with a dime on both groups. Also close to the same with 33.8 GRS. Of H4895 with same bullet. The old girl still has some life in her! Thanks for all the help and advice.
     

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  15. Nick Caprinolo

    Nick Caprinolo Gold $$ Contributor

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    I have always followed the policy that the closer to the lands the better the accuracy. That is until yesterday.

    I have a Remington 22-250 with a 1/14 twist. I have never had anything close to a good group with it. I used the recommended powder, H380 and tested loads over and over again with the bullet set touching the lands and a little be less. Nothing I did made a difference.

    It was suggested that I run a ladder test on OAL and not be afraid to really be off the lands and further change powder, using Varget. Yesterday, I did just that. Starting at 10 thousands off the lands, I found that the further I cut back, the smaller the groups. I went backwards in 10 thousands steps and finally at 120 thousands off the lands I hit the jackpot. two three shot groups looking very close to one hole. I loaded 35.4 grs of powder for the entire spread. The only reason I didn't go back further, is I ran out of loaded ammo.

    The chamber Remington cuts in their barrel is 190 thousands over Saami standard OAL. I travel to the range each week with a group of five long time shooters and reloaders. All were amazed at the results. We all have believed that, to a degree, closer was better.
     
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  16. Grapevine

    Grapevine

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    It’s funny that you mentioned that. When I was loading my test loads , I didn’t reset my seating die after starting a new load. I seated the first bullet way deeper than recommended OAL. I marked it with a sharpie and threw it in with the others. When shooting that batch, I shot all into pretty good groups. I saved the “stubby” one for last, not wanting to spoil my group, I shot at a different bull. Maybe just a fluke? Will be experimenting some to see.
     

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