Needing a good scale

Discussion in 'Gear Talk: What to Buy? and Gear Evaluations' started by linekin, May 11, 2018.

  1. linekin

    linekin Silver $$ Contributor

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    I am new to reloading & am needing a better scale. I have been loading with my mentor still & using his digital scale, which I'm comfortable with. So therefore I'm thinking digital is what I should be looking for.
    I've seen beam scales advertised here from time to time & am wondering if maybe I should give one of those a shot. For some reason I'm thinking they would be much slower for me to use & am wondering how you guys use them. Mostly speaking of tenth's of grains measuring.
    Do you set the scale up to a desired weight & trickle up to it. I feel like measuring each throw & fiddling with the counterweight for each would be a big PIA.
    Any help appreciated.
    Keith
     
  2. geraldgee

    geraldgee Gold $$ Contributor

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    Evaluate what your needs are. Are you going to reload 200 or more rounds a week/month/yr? Once you determine what your actual needs are, buy the type of scale that will adequately meet your needs AND give you some room to grow. Then buy the best scale of the type best suited for you that you can afford. I have easily wasted a thousand dollars on scales that I just wasn't satisfied with and unfortuanltely sold some that I wish I had back.
    Good luck on your choice and safe reloading to you.

    Gerald
     
  3. Ledd Slinger

    Ledd Slinger Gold $$ Contributor

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    RCBS Chargemaster and A&D FX120i. Life is good :)
     
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  4. walker2713

    walker2713 Gold $$ Contributor

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    Most beam scales properly set up and maintained will do the job.

    Here's my setup: Chargemaster Lite, Omega 2 tricklying into the pan of an RCBS 505, with an inexpensive usb camera set up so that I can precisely see the scale setting.

    IMG_0890.jpg d
     
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  5. gambleone

    gambleone Silver $$ Contributor

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    Gem pro 250 are nice and accurate for the money, but you need to take your time
    with it and learn how to use it properly. I use a beam scale to get close then use the
    gem pro to fine tune the load. You just can't trickle with the gem pro due to its
    strain gauge technology. JMHO
     
  6. linekin

    linekin Silver $$ Contributor

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    Thanks for all the responses guys. I'm loading about 200-250 rounds a month now as I'm shooting a little more cf this year. Not that that makes any difference as far as time is concerned. I'm not looking to do it faster. The one that I have now seems cheap & not repeatable, therefore I'm still loading with my mentor. That & I'm still learning a lot.
    To be honest I'm just throwing them directly into the cases. I do throw & weigh about a dozen before starting & check the weights & once I'm happy the thrower is consistent I have at it. I do weigh a charge after a dozen throws or so to make sure its still within "my window".
    I am loading 34.6 grans but if its a tenth either way I'm fine with it. I'm shooting short range with a 30br which may be a little more forgiving than some. Don't know, as I said I'm new to it still.
    I guess the reason for my question is I just don't trust electronics much & was thinking a beam scale may be for me. Having said that I believe an electronic scale would be much simpler to use.
    Keith
     
  7. CharlieNC

    CharlieNC Silver $$ Contributor

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    To answer your question about scale setup, you simply set for the desired weight and trickle to it; no benefit to weigh every throw. Of course the graduations at the pointer give a close indication. I use a Lee Perfect thrower which is usually around .3 gr light, and with the Dandy trickle onto a tuned Redding beam. Typically 15 to 20 second process. The low cost strain gauge digitals are slower as the response time is not "instantaneous" when trickling, and "rapid" drift requires frequent zeroing. While I use one to confirm the initial beam loads, it is too slow based on aforementioned characteristics.

    The Chargemaster is quite good if you spend a bit of time tuning the control parameters and a proper charge tube insert to achieve fine-stream trickling. Its autozeroing capability eliminates drift. While charges are typically within .05gr, the resulting cycle time is longer than when using a beam; but a bullet can be seated during this time. Performance on long range steel is fully acceptable, but I like the beam for fclass.
     
  8. jim_k

    jim_k

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    RCBS 505 is the quickest and easiest to use. Get a set of the Lee Loader measures, and you'll probably end up using the 2.5 or 2.8 for this load. Pour the powder in a glass dish, and scoop out of that, then pour into the powder cup. Set up an RCBS or Frankford Arsenal trickler beside the cup, and trickle in the last few kernels of powder. Touch the powder cup just shy of the exact setting, and let it settle. The RCBS 505 can detect the addition of a single kernel of powder, if you free the beam each time you measure (free the beam by moving the pan down gently, which raises the beam on the indicator side, not neccessarily all the way to the top of the indicator, but above level.) Try to find a beam scale with 1/10 indications on the measuring indicator portion at the left side of the beam. That way you know about how many kernels you need to trickle; roughly 4 kernels per 1/10 grain, with 4895, 4064, and other standard extruded powders. With tiny extruded or ball powder, it's even easier, since they trickle in small enough amounts that you are not likely to exceed your target weight.
     
  9. denwhit1

    denwhit1 Silver $$ Contributor

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    I trickle into the Gem Pro 250 all the time and the scale reads accurately. I'm wondering if I'm doing it wrong.
     
  10. gambleone

    gambleone Silver $$ Contributor

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    Seems that i was getting inaccurate measurements when i trickled. I was checking this with a redding master beam scale just to double check, so i now i trickle onto the beam scale and then set the pan on the 250. I'm going to experiment with this again now since you seem to be doing ok
    that way.
     
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  11. RetiredArmy

    RetiredArmy Silver $$ Contributor

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    I also trickle to my gem pro. No issues, take my time let it settle and all is well. If you want to double check it just pick your pan up and set it back on the scale.
    Thanks Bill
     

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