Neck turning recommendations

Discussion in 'Reloading Forum (All Calibers)' started by Topwater, Oct 9, 2017.

  1. Topwater

    Topwater Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2017
    Messages:
    123
    I would like to get into neck turning but have no personal experience with the process. I have watched several videos on the subject. I would appreciate suggestions on an appropriate tool. I would be loading for .222, 22/250, .243, 6mm, 6xc, 7mm08, 7mm mag. & 30.06. It would also be a plus if the cost didn't break the bank. Thanks in advance, everyone.
     
  2. JohnW...ski

    JohnW...ski

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2011
    Messages:
    113
     
  3. JohnW...ski

    JohnW...ski

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2011
    Messages:
    113
    I went with a K & M neck turner and built a lathe out of a power screwdriver. I have turned necks on .14/221, .17 Mk IV, .20VT, .221 Fireball, and
    6 PPC. I can't speak for other brands of neck turners but I couldn't be happier with the performance and customer service of K & M.

    John K & M Neck Turning Lathe.jpeg
     
  4. Mozella

    Mozella

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,202
    Like most things associated with our sport, the 21st Century Lathe and cutter head are just expensive enough to make you choke a little bit. However, once you use it, you will quickly forget the pain to your wallet. The design is very good as is the quality.

    Repetitive tasks, like neck turning, quickly gets tedious so spending a bit more for a nice piece of equipment in order to make the job easier and/or quicker makes sense. Plus, unlike some turning equipment, the 21st Century lathe is accurate and repeatable. It's easy to make very fine adjustments in the depth and length of cut and easy to repeat it later on if you happen to want a new batch to match your old batch some time in the future.

    Changing calibers isn't difficult nor is it too expensive. I power mine with a cordless drill motor. It's very quick to operate and I highly recommend it.

    You can buy just the hand held cutter head, but I think it's well worth it to buy the lathe assembly. It removes any operator induced error which might be caused by holding the cutter head a little differently from case-to-case. They have a very clever way of mounting the cutter head so that it floats and self aligns and that helps produce consistent results. Plus it speeds up the operation.
     
  5. LHSmith

    LHSmith

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2008
    Messages:
    4,292
    Unless you are loading for a tighter than SAAMI chamber neck, don't waste your money and time. All you will be doing is increase the slop in the case to chamber fit which is counterproductive accuracy-wise. Investing, instead, on a quality case trimmer, annealing machine, or case headspace tools would be tools which would result in dividends -accuracy-wise and in case longevity.
     
  6. geraldgee

    geraldgee Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2011
    Messages:
    682
    What I have found is that even with factory chambers, I would reduce overall runout if I skim-turned my necks. When I 1st bought a Ball micrometer to measure neck thickness, I was astonished by the thickness variation. Reducing the amount of that variation has been helpful in increasing the consistency of my hand loads. I also believe I get more consistent neck tension. I'm not talking about turning to tight-neck dimensions - just enough to clean up any excessive thickness variations.

    Good luck with whatever you decide.
     
    'Freak likes this.
  7. Preacher

    Preacher Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2005
    Messages:
    5,280
    K&M will do all you need done for very little money...
    A light skim cut is all that is needed...
     
    mikegaiz likes this.
  8. Shynloco

    Shynloco You can lead a horse to water, but ........

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2010
    Messages:
    3,050
    As the others have said, unless you are getting into Precision Shooting and reloading, don't waste your money or your time. However, I learned the hard way when getting into Precision Reloading and Shooting, I bought two hand turning tools before settling in on the 21st Century Case Turning Lathe which is the type of case turning (using a Lathe) that offers the most precise neck turning. And as LH Smith wrote, IMHO, unless you have custom chambers, neck turning is a waste of time and money on a SAMMI spec (across the counter rifle/chamber) UNLESS you want to "clean up" your brass with a slight cut that may improve concentricity for better accuracy. But unless you have the proper equipment to check concentricity, you would be guessing as to whether your brass is so far off to warrant "cleaning up". And again that may not be needed if you are NOT loading for critical accuracy such as that sought in competition. In short, hunting loads do not need necks turned to accurately hit your prey. Consistent groups of 1" (5 shot groups) make no difference when hunting is the purpose to reload your ammo. Also, consistency and accuracy means what you do to one, you do to all.

    Alex
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2017
    Mark204, C.E.Smith043 and CH Luke like this.
  9. mikegaiz

    mikegaiz Stay frosty, my friend. Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2009
    Messages:
    754
    I would go with K&M, it also fixes donuts.
     
  10. johnfred1965

    johnfred1965

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,118
    One that hasn't been mentioned is the PMA cutter. I am totally satisfied with the one I have. If you are going to trim a high volume of cases, definitely invest in the carbide mandrel.

    JohnW Like the handiwork on the improvised Lathe. I haven't gotten so fancy, just chuck it in the old drill!
     
  11. Topwater

    Topwater Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2017
    Messages:
    123
    Thanks for all your responses. I am trying to improve the accuracy enough to be competitive in our club. This change in direction from just producing effective hunting ammo has opened up a whole new world of detail of which I was unaware. As a "newbie" here, I'm learning a lot. Thanks again.

    "Stitch"
     
  12. C.E.Smith043

    C.E.Smith043 Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2017
    Messages:
    332
    Spot On!!!!
     
  13. LHSmith

    LHSmith

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2008
    Messages:
    4,292
    #1 hands down shortest path to achieving accuracy is windflags.......and learn what they are telling you.....which means shoot and shoot alot taking meticulous records of load changes and conditions during testing and practice. If you can't get your gun to shoot with repeatable results after load work up using the same load under the same conditions you will be spinning your wheels and never learn anything. Bottom line - you need an ACCURATE gun to learn with.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2017
  14. Richard Coody

    Richard Coody Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2017
    Messages:
    1,649
    what he said!

    improves runout and consistency in neck tension. if you are looking for 0.10 improvements in group size it will show up on your target.

    this is the one i like. get the cutter that matches your shoulder angle

    http://www.pmatool.com/pma-neck-turning-tool-model-a-30-degree/
     
  15. T-shooter

    T-shooter

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2017
    Messages:
    1,741
    Most dies center the neck from the outside. If the thickness varies, the inside diameter will not be centered producing an increase in bullet runout. Most unturned necks will have a thick and thin side, sometimes .003" or more difference.
     
  16. Joe R

    Joe R Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2013
    Messages:
    1,933
  17. jimmymac

    jimmymac Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2017
    Messages:
    1,446
    At the speed he's feeding those cases in, it's no wonder he needs the power of a corded drill. That to me looks like the brute force method of neck turning. I wonder if the end result produces consistent results.
     
  18. Joe R

    Joe R Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2013
    Messages:
    1,933
    No brute force involved. Actually torque is good because I can turn necks at a slow speed. Slow speed is better because it creates less heat. Heat is bad when neck turning because it makes the case neck expand creating more variance in neck walls and that is bad. I can get .0003 precision with little effort. Try that with a hand held.

    You can spend more money but IMO you wont get a better neck turner. YMMV.

    Looks like Hornady finally put out a video promoting their tool.

     
  19. LHSmith

    LHSmith

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2008
    Messages:
    4,292
    True, you can go the extra mile and potentially gain a bit more loaded round concentricity with the proper dies, but remember that the typical neck clearance on a factory rifle is 0.008" to 0.014". When the loaded round is chambered, there is nothing to prevent the bias imposed on the round by the ejector, or gravity if one would remove the ejector. This means the bullet is not true to the bore centerline ......meaning it enters the throat off-axis....no matter how perfect the neck wall thickness.
     
  20. ImBIllT

    ImBIllT

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2008
    Messages:
    328
    If you neck size or partial size, then the unsized portion of case will improve alignment in the chamber. If you only size a portion of the neck, then even the neck of the case will improve alignment in the chamber.
     

Share This Page