motion sensor for coyotes

Discussion in 'Varminter & Hunting Forum' started by markT, Sep 27, 2017.

  1. Huntschool

    Huntschool Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2017
    Messages:
    77

    I would like to suggest that yotes respond to their environment...... if they are comfortable insid of 100 yards of a dwelling then they will be there.

    I killed 7 in what is my back yard from 12 yards to 125 (around the house) this past breeding season. We have barn cats and I guess that is a solid food source for them as my wife has lost many.

    We are rural living on 60 acres with woods and open pasture around us. I mean we are really rural save for a local consolidated school within 300 yards of the house and the administration of said school as wellas the teachers know that a gunshot from my property usually means a dead coyote. One of our neighbors has lost numerous chickens to the yotes as the fox have been all but extirpated from around us.

    I am sure there are areas where they can not be shot but current research says they are filling gaps and adapting to our current life style.....

    They do come into our "yards" near our houses.......

    Nuf said......

    Bruce A. Hering
    Program Coordinator/Lead Instructor (retired)
    Shotgun Team Coach
    Southeastern Illinois College
    SCTP Collegiate Coaches Chairman
    NSCA Level III
     
  2. markT

    markT Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2014
    Messages:
    358
    I started putting out sardines in soybean oil on Sunday. Nothing has touched my two bait areas. I poured the oil onto the side a utility pole and the other location is a stump.. I do have trail camera pictures of a coyote feeding on whole corn ( I think) that I put out for deer. The corn is ~20 yards from the sardines. They are really smart, well fed, or don't care for sardines.. Any thoughts or ideas?
     
  3. Knotwild

    Knotwild Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2010
    Messages:
    402
    I met a guy in Texas who trapped for the county. He would put meat in a 1 gallon glass jar and put it in the sun in his yard until it rotted. He would paint it on a contraption that shot cyanide down their throat and it worked great.
     
  4. timeout

    timeout Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,888
    Thankfully, cyanide guns are illegal in most states. They are an indiscriminate killer. A good predator control agent can do the job without those in his toolbox.
     
    Mark W likes this.
  5. markT

    markT Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2014
    Messages:
    358
    Been awhile since I've done anything for coyotes but now I've started putting out deer bones and cheap canned dog food. There's a nice huge coyote that has been coming in to the bait area. I put up some solar spot lights (very dim) yesterday. Not sure if that will bother them. Also got a platform built in the gable end of an old barn. This is ~90 yds from the bait pile. I'll check camera today and see if they showed up
     

    Attached Files:

    boltfluter likes this.
  6. spencerhenry

    spencerhenry

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2014
    Messages:
    219
    Bait piles and motion sensors work great. It works best with deep snow so that the carcass is frozen to the ground and they are much easier to see with the backdrop of white. They will haul off everything if it is not tied down or frozen in the snow. They will over time be able to "see" red light, in the beginning of using red light I never had one take off, after a couple of years, I only get a few seconds of the red light in their eyes before they are gone, sometimes they are gone instantly.
    Two or even three will come in, I shoot one and the other two get smarter. Sometimes the others will come back in an hour or two, on a few occassions I have killed multiples in one night. I have killed one within feet of a dead one on a few ocassions.
    Thermals and NV are not legal in colorado, though I know lots of guys use it.
     
  7. AckleymanII

    AckleymanII Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    May 11, 2006
    Messages:
    2,196
    I killed one, a few minutes later, another showed up and started licking the other, dropped him. Now, two in pile. Next, another showed up, dropped him, three in a pile.

    If coyotes live in close proximity to your house, they will travel through your yard, unless you have a large outdoor dog, which they may try and screw or eat, constantly. They will snatch pets off your back door step in broad daylight, and if you feed outdoor wild life canned or dry dog/cat food, those animals are guiding coyotes to your house constantly.

    So, what is worse than coyotes coming into your yard? Skunks in the kitchen that come through the doggy door eating your cat's food!
     
    wholman likes this.
  8. brians356

    brians356 Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2013
    Messages:
    3,205
    A skunk can stink you out, but a cornered raccoon can tear you up. Both best avoided.
    -
     
  9. Someoldguy

    Someoldguy Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2017
    Messages:
    617
    I've had to deal with both. As you say, both best avoided but if a choice must be made, I'd prefer the skunk. Them raccoons are CRAZY.
     
  10. brians356

    brians356 Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2013
    Messages:
    3,205
    I'm sitting my living room, summer evening with the front door open for the breeze, watching TV. Out of the corner of my eye I see my cat wander in. I look over and it's a big boar raccoon sitting five feet away on my carpet, staring at me as like "What're you going to do about it, bub?" I sat there staring back for ten seconds, and he calmly turned around and sauntered out again. Startled the bejeezus out of me. They're a whole lot bigger sitting in your front room.
    -
     
  11. markT

    markT Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2014
    Messages:
    358
    Frozen ground and deep snow ain't an option for upstate SC..I'm thinking I may bury a couple of PT 4" x 4" posts and leave ~6" above grade. That way I can fasten some meat scrap bones with screws to the posts to keep the canines in theater longer. This should also work with canned dog food.
    The ground where the bait pile is located is a bambo patch that was cut tight with a rotary cutter ( Bush Hog) and the clippings are very light color and reflects light.
     
  12. Someoldguy

    Someoldguy Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2017
    Messages:
    617
    I've hit a few with the car coming home after second shift. The oppossums are like a ball of hay. Just a bit of noise and that's all. Hit a raccoon @ 70 MPH and you'll think the whole friggin' front suspension of your car just got torn off and your speed just dropped to 50.

    Crazy raccoons.
     
  13. brians356

    brians356 Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2013
    Messages:
    3,205
    I've tripled up like that on California ground squirrels (Otospermophilus beecheyi) on a desert rockpile. They're cannibalistic - splatter one and soon one or two more might venture forth to gnaw on their brother. While that was unfolding, a Chukar Partridge perched calmly through the carnage not ten feet away.
    -
     
  14. brians356

    brians356 Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2013
    Messages:
    3,205
    The problem with raccoons is they have no sense of humor. All business, all the time.
    -
     
  15. FatOldMIHunter

    FatOldMIHunter

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2017
    Messages:
    199
    You might just try those solar powered walkway lights that stick in the ground. They are dim white light, but the yotes get used to them and they are bright enough to make an ordinary scope effective at night.
     
    Immike likes this.
  16. Someoldguy

    Someoldguy Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2017
    Messages:
    617
    Interesting idea.
     
  17. markT

    markT Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2014
    Messages:
    358
    The yote I'm after won't get near any light.. I tried a solar powered spot light mounted up high and he won't touch the food.. if I remove the light.. a few days later he's on it. Smart / cautious ole fella..
     
    WyleWD and Westhunder like this.
  18. Westhunder

    Westhunder Please excuse typos, sent from my iPhone. Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    251
    I’m going to purchase a thermal after I see what’s released at shot show. Trijicon and the company they bought out have some pretty awesome stuff now. Problem we have in SC is you can’t see very far and they have lots of ways to sneak off and circle around. Hoping the thermal helps that some but still difficult.
     
  19. tripdad

    tripdad

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2016
    Messages:
    53
    For your bait pile take 5 gallon bucket with lid drill or cut some 3" or so holes in it so they can get their snout in but can't drag bait out to much at a time. Either drive stake through bottom of bucket or tie it to a stake or pole so cant drag off. A farm i the farmer does this with 30 gal drum, we put deer gut piles in it. He shoots a few off it every Year
     
  20. markT

    markT Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2014
    Messages:
    358
    I'm in the market for a thermal too.. maybe the "S" show. ( no pun intended) will revel some newer models and lower cost models..
    Also, I like the idea of the 5 gal bucket affixed to the ground. Thks.
     
    Westhunder likes this.

Share This Page