Induction Annealing???

Discussion in 'Reloading Forum (All Calibers)' started by Bullet94, Nov 8, 2009.

  1. Bullet94

    Bullet94

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    Check out this link -

    http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=484722
     
  2. Gearheadpyro

    Gearheadpyro

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  3. gambleone

    gambleone Site $$ Contributor

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    That's quite a set up. Thanks Gearheadpyro, & for the Youtube video. :)
     
  4. mikecr

    mikecr

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    A form of temperature control seems needed. That brass taken to chery red in the video is ruined.
     
  5. Gearheadpyro

    Gearheadpyro

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    mikecr:
    I'm working on automating it to take my slightly inaccurate timing out of it. That one piece got a tad too hot, but no glaze formed and it is not supple in my hand, it does not appear destroyed. I will still load and shoot it.
     
  6. dantiff2

    dantiff2

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    Brass that has turned red is not ruined.. Mine turns red slightly and still shoots little groups and holds the bullet for a .020 jam in the lands.

    Dan
     
  7. Gearheadpyro

    Gearheadpyro

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    I originally tried that, but it did not work as well as I had expected. I think it would work better if I got a longer wire for the U-Form Coil, and doubled layered the loops. The more loops in the coil you have the stronger the field is and therefore the greater capacity for heating.
     
  8. NorCalMikie

    NorCalMikie Site $$ Contributor

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    What about the "water quench" after the brass is heated? I thought "that" was part of the process?
     
  9. Gearheadpyro

    Gearheadpyro

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    Brass is a unique metal in that rapid cooling is not needed for proper annealing.

    Neither the Ken Light automatic annealer nor the zephyr dynamics Brass-o-matic use a water quench, although the Ken Light machine i think (could be wrong on this) does use boiling water in the turntable as a heat sink.
     
  10. dantiff2

    dantiff2

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    Honestly there is NO benifit to water quenching brass. The neck/shoulder is the only thing to reach annealing temps and then starts the cooling process imediately after the heat source is removed. There is some heat transfered to the case body/head, but it is not nearly hot enough to do anything "bad". Quenching is used in the hardening process of iron (steel)
     
  11. Steve Blair

    Steve Blair Site $$ Contributor

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    Cartridge brass is a 70% Copper, 30% Zinc alloy that derives no benefit at all from quenching. Hardening can only occur by mechanical means and annealing can be accomplished by quickly heating to between 750 and 800 f and air and/or conduction cooling. Attached is a PDF with more information than you wanted to know about cartridge brass.

    This article by Jim Harris and Ken Light explains annealing generally and the BC 1000 specifically. I own one of these fine machines and use it every three firings on my brass.
     

    Attached Files:

  12. jo191145

    jo191145 Site $$ Contributor

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    There is no need to quench brass while annealing IF you do it properly. Quenching merely helps rapidly cool the brass to prevent heat convecting down the body. Its not a bad thing to do but not entirely necessary.
    In longish cases like 308, 204R etc I do not quench entirely. I place a folded towel inside a bucket and add water until its just below the surface of the towel. Using a drill and deep dish socket (heat sink)of the appropriate size I spin the case for the alotted amount of time. Varies by neck thickness and circumference and of course flame temp. Then just dump onto the saturated towel.
    Gives a cooling effect without total immersion and the need to dry.

    I've done the long cases entirely dry but I like the half wet method just for peace of mind.

    Short cases like 6ppc and 6BR I still quench fully. We run those little things at some mighty high pressures and I'd rather deal with drying than dying ;)
     
  13. Gearheadpyro

    Gearheadpyro

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    That's an excellent article on annealing sleepygator. Thanks.
     
  14. Rust

    Rust

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    Couple of questions:

    What is the power requirement for the inductor, 155 V? 15 amps outlet or 20 amp outlet?

    What does the inductor cost?
     
  15. Gearheadpyro

    Gearheadpyro

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    120v, I plug it straight into a normal wall socket without any issues.

    I picked it up on tooltopia for $370
     
  16. Rust

    Rust

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    Well, I think my days of sitting in a dark garage with a propane torch might be over, might even give some thought to automating the process.
     
  17. Gearheadpyro

    Gearheadpyro

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    I'm working on that myself. Got my layout just about ready, next is parts ordering.
     
  18. 686

    686

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    FOR AUTO USE a dilion 650 with case feader, no dies, mt the coil off the tool head and crank away.
     
  19. 686

    686

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    does most br shooters anneal there brass? how often do you anneal the brass?
     
  20. Rust

    Rust

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    686 - Many short range bench resters do not need to anneal brass, they neck turn their brass to a few tne thousandths or less of the actual chamber dimensions and he fit is so tight the brass does not expand to the point of plastic deformation (which is why "standard" chambers require resizing of the brass).

    In the case of may long range shooters (myself included) longer strings of fire with larger cases require a bit more clearance so the chambers neck has sufficient clearance (for reliability of feeding with fouling present) that the brass is allowed to expand which requires resizing to reload. This resizing work hardens the brass. Work hardening changes the amount of neck tension and tends to vary from case to case which introduces a variance from round to round, which can show up on the target quite easily at 1,000 yards. Annealing helps keep things consistant. In addition, annealing can extend the life of the brass reducing the incidence of damage like neck splits. The consistancy is really the reason to anneal brass though in competitive shooting.

    The consistant neck tension is an important part of achieving single digit Es and SD numbers.
     

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