I almost hate to even ask this question. Scope MOA at distance

Discussion in 'Scopes, Optics, LRFs, Spotters, BoreScopes' started by Lefty Trigger, Aug 10, 2018 at 3:46 PM.

  1. Lefty Trigger

    Lefty Trigger

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    If my scope is 1/8 inch moa per click at 100yds is it then 1/4 inch at 200yds and 3/8 inch at 300yds and so on. That is my thinking but got into and argument at the field that it is always 1/8 inch. "There is no way" I said because for me to go from 100yds to 300yds my bullet needs to come up about 8 inches but on the scope I only dial in about 2.6 inches on the dial.
     
  2. bradb

    bradb

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    Its always a 1/8 MOA at any distance.........but you are mixing MOA and inches. So MOA is 1.047 not a inch. Your "close enough" 1/8 moa as 1/8 inch works they way you are saying it.
    I personally would think of it this way: say you need to come up 2.6 moa to be on at 300 yards, then just dial to 2.6 and you got it. Try not to think in inches
     
  3. Lefty Trigger

    Lefty Trigger

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    But my dials are labeled in inches, 8 clicks to 1 inch.
     
  4. Doug Beach

    Doug Beach Silver $$ Contributor

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    If your dials are labeled as 8 clicks to 1 inch,(1/8” per click) that will only be true at one distance. If that distance is 100 yards, then at 200 yards, each click will be worth 1/4”. At 400 yards, each click will be worth 1/2”. Conversely, at 50 yards, each click will be worth 1/16”.
     
  5. Lefty Trigger

    Lefty Trigger

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    Ok, then it is like I thought so at 1000 yards each click is worth 1.25 inches. I knew I was right, there is no way that 1/8 inch click is still 1/8 inch at 300 yards.
    Thanks for the help guy's......
     
  6. VaRandy

    VaRandy Silver $$ Contributor

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    Someone trying to help you knows enough about Mils to be the problem.
     
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  7. mike06

    mike06

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    If you have a Android phone are tablet there is a ballistic app called Strelok try the free version it will help you with figure it out. I used it for about 3 years then bought the pro version best 11 bucks I ever spent it has about every scope and bullet in it's data base you will ever need.
     
  8. Meangreen

    Meangreen

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    Inches are a linear measurement, MOA and MILS are angular measurements. An inch at 100 yards is still an inch at 1000 yards, 1minute of angle is a different linear size at each distance, but is always the same angle.
     
  9. Ned Ludd

    Ned Ludd Silver $$ Contributor

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    Perhaps these cartoons may help. The disconnect in your argument was caused by trying to compare two different measurements; angular measurement versus arc measurement subtended by a given angle at some distance. As you seem to be aware, they are not at all the same thing. The angular measurement does not change over distance; an angle stays the same as far out as the two rays are extended. The arc subtended by a given angle changes proportionally with distance. That is why it is generally better in the long run to forget about how many inches such and such and angle is at such and such a distance. It's simply not necessary with an MOA- or MIL-based reticle, with the one caveat of first focal plane (FFP) versus second focal plane (SFP) scopes.

    With an FFP scope, the reticle changes size as magnification changes and always remains proportional to the image size. Thus, FFP reticle hashmarks (or other indicator marks) always represent the same angular measurement, regardless of magnification.

    A SFP scope will be calibrated such that the angular measurement of the reticle hashmarks (or other indicator marks) are calibrated at a single specific magnification, and the reticle does not change in size as the magnification and image size change. For example, a Nightforce Competition scope is calibrated at 40X. That means the reticle hashmarks represent a specific angular measurement at 40X mag. However, it is possible to use a SFP scope reasonably well at some other mag besides 40X. If you're using your NF Comp at ~20X, the image will necessarily be about half the size it would at 40X. Since the reticle doesn't change in size, you can make a reasonable estimate that the hashmarks would then represent double the angular measurement they would at 40X magnification.


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  10. BoydAllen

    BoydAllen

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    ...inches at 100 yards. MOA is an angular measurement that is exactly 1/60 of a degree. As you probably know there are 360 degrees in a circle, but fewer know that each degree can be divided into 60 minutes, and each minute of arc or angle can be divided into 60 seconds, each of which is equal to 1/360 degree. Doing the math a 20 MOA base is angled 1/3 degree from level.
     
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  11. South Prairie jim

    South Prairie jim

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    Yards divided buy eight
     
  12. South Prairie jim

    South Prairie jim

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    One click is 3/8 at 300
    3 divided by 8=.375
     

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