How Much Electrical Tape to make No-Go Gauge

Discussion in 'Reloading Forum (All Calibers)' started by centershot, Apr 14, 2019 at 9:07 AM.

  1. cw308

    cw308

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    Well nothing beats using the best tools , I found using a Go Gauge with shims and a stripped bolt I can get a exact measurement from bolt face the a shoulder datum , checking with a RCBS Precision Mic . Good tool to measure case gap ( headspace) and bolt face to ogive setting . Some like trying different ways and passing on what works , may help someone without spending money on tools . I don't see this as BS just passing around ways to try . No harm in trying .
     
  2. Texas10

    Texas10 Gold $$ Contributor

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    I'm still confused by your statement that the range brass "seems a bit loose" in your chamber. Perhaps that needs further explanation.

    If you want to know just how much the range brass might be undersized for use in YOUR chamber, partially seat some spent primers so they are quite proud and chamber them. The protrusion of the primer will show you how much short they might be. Or you can use a headspace comparator gage to measure base to datum and compare to your fire formed brass.

    I presume you're not talking about a belted cartridge.
     
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  3. sparky123321

    sparky123321

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    Silly me, I buy both the go and no-go gauges.
     
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  4. LarryDScott

    LarryDScott Site $$ Sponsor

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    The last gauge I bought from JGS was 100.00. I dont call that cheap unless you are
    a full time GS, and at that its still high. LDS
     
  5. centershot

    centershot Silver $$ Contributor

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    I think this is going a bit off of topic. I purchased fires brass from more than one person. It was done so that I did not have to spend the time and components making my own Ackley brass. When I received one batch, the bolt handle would not go down. I solved that problem by filing the shell holder own to push back the shoulder. On some of the brass, the bolt handle would very easily go down. I want to make sure that they do not have excess head space. Thus, the tape on the brass. Yes, I can seat those rounds to engage the rifling. I will go to the range tomorrow and shoot a few to see if they show signs of separating. These are being prepared for a prairie dog hunt so there is a lot of brass to sort through.
     
  6. MS50

    MS50 Silver $$ Contributor

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    Dislaimer: I'm no expert. I agree it's simpler. At the time I was in the middle of a Savage project, I couldn't find a 223 no go gauge. They were backordered, special order, no information on lead time, etc. Didn't want to mix and match, although I still don't understand why they differ. Ended up with a go gauge and used the tape. Didn't want to but it worked.
     
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  7. txtaxman

    txtaxman Silver $$ Contributor

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    It is not clear what measuring capability you have.

    My suggestion is to obtain a digital (or dial) caliper and a “Hornady Lock-N-Load Headspace Gauge 5 Bushing Set with Comparator.” Measure the length of case head to datum on a case fired in your rifle. Adjust your sizing die to set the shoulder of sized cases to 0.002 inches less than your fired cases.

    Setting the sizing die for cam over takes the slack out of the press’ linkage and ensures consistency of the length of case head to datum of the sized cases.

    Cases that are apparently short now may lengthen as their bodies are sized. In any case by measuring before and after sizing, you will know how they compare to your criteria.
     
  8. hogpatrol

    hogpatrol Gold $$ Contributor

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    Where's the Guff when you need him?

    Jerry, You mean I can't use a piece of brass to set headspace? :p:D
     
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  9. varget204

    varget204

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    you can use .001 to .002 shim stock,sold at auto parts stores,or use Yellow page from phone book,most are .002,just cut to size and place on back of go gage for minimum headspace
     
  10. Uncle Ed

    Uncle Ed

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    centershot

    I have had brand new cases that were .009 shorter than a GO gauge. Your problem is you bought cases fired in other rifles with different headspace settings and different chamber reamers.

    Using the primer method mentioned here will let you know how much head clearance your shorter cases have. Meaning using the bolt face to seat a fired spent primer will tell you how much head clearance or air space you have between the rear of the case and the bolt face

    [​IMG]

    Measure a case from its base to the case mouth and write the measurement down.

    [​IMG]

    Now using your fingers start a primer into the primer pocket and then use the bolt face to finish seating the primer as you close the bolt.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Now measure the case again from the base of the primer to the case mouth and write it down.

    Now subtract the first case measurement from the second measurement and this will be your head clearance.

    If you have a Hornady cartridge case headspace gauge and any headspace gauge you can compare the seated primer measurement with the headspace gauge to get your chamber length.

    Below a Colt 5.56 Field gauge at 1.4736

    [​IMG]

    Below a Hornady cartridge case headspace gauge that has been adjusted to read the actual headspace. This vernier caliper is accurate to .0005 so the most it will be off is 1/2 a thousandths or .0005.

    [​IMG]

    Below measuring a fired Lake City case from my AR15 rifle and a close approximate of my chambers length minus brass spring back. And my die was then set to bump the shoulder back .002 to .003.

    [​IMG]
     
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  11. centershot

    centershot Silver $$ Contributor

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    Fantastic!! Great post. BTW, is that a .303 British?
     
  12. scubohuntr

    scubohuntr

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    Take your extractor out first and use a cleaning rod to push the case out. With the case head held by one edge, you could be getting enough of a lever moment to push the primer in more than it should be. Of course, you are measuring the case first and comparing it to SAAMI specs (including angles), right? Or, you could talk to a gunsmith and ask him what he would charge you to run a FIELD gauge into your chamber. That is the only one that is really meaningful in this context. GO and NO-GO are for cutting new chambers. I'm betting it wouldn't be very expensive.
     
  13. Uncle Ed

    Uncle Ed

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    Yes it was a .303 British, and on any rimmed cartridge if you add the rim thickness to your head clearance you have your chambers headspace. MY photos were from a posting showing Enfield owners how to check their headspace without headspace gauges.

    Below Australian headspace gauges from 1946-1947

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Below my .303 British headspace gauges, .064 is the GO gauge AND .074 is the Field gauge.

    [​IMG]

    I have two bolt heads fitted to my center bedded 1950 No4 Mk2 Enfield.

    [​IMG]
     
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