How Much Electrical Tape to make No-Go Gauge

Discussion in 'Reloading Forum (All Calibers)' started by centershot, Apr 14, 2019.

  1. centershot

    centershot Silver $$ Contributor

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    I purchased a bunch of brass that seems a bit loose in my chamber. Some have stated the use of putting electrical tape on the base of the casing to check for excessive head space. I measured the thickness of the tape that I have and it is .0065". I realize that the tape will compress when the bolt handle is closed. I do not feel much resistance with one thickness, but can feel the resistance with two. Is this too much head space?
     
  2. 22DASHER

    22DASHER Gold $$ Contributor

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    Scotch tape. Thickness is about .002 each piece. Electrical tape is too squishy and thick
     
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  3. MS50

    MS50 Silver $$ Contributor

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    I used two layers of the glossy transparent scotch tape. Thickness was .003. I suppose this may vary with brands used.
     
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  4. J.d. Popkes

    J.d. Popkes Silver $$ Contributor

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    I think a small piece of lead is what ya need. A little flake. Put it on the case head or bolt face, chamber, eject, measure the squished lead piece
     
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  5. 243winxb

    243winxb

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    Soda can about .004" cut a small piece.

    We are getting real high tech now. :D
     
  6. M-61

    M-61 "Quis Separabit" Gold $$ Contributor

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    Yes it sure does
     
  7. spclark

    spclark Gold $$ Contributor

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    This is new brass, not somebody’s cast-offs?

    I use polyester packing tape. Seems easier to get off than the 3M stuff but measure what you use first as brands differ in thickness.

    If indeed factory new it’s short for a reason, that being short (but still within SAAMI case tolerance) will fit more chambers than long... or so the lawyers say.
     
  8. Mark W

    Mark W Gold $$ Contributor

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  9. jimbo_10x

    jimbo_10x

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    Plastigage , never thought about using it on this aplication but it should work great .
    I have used it on alot of other jobs .
    Great idea !
     
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  10. linebaugh

    linebaugh Silver $$ Contributor

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    I use the aluminum duct tape used for doing the duct work in your house. It's a bit less likely to crush and holds very well. Typically the roll I have runs .0025
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2019
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  11. carlsbad

    carlsbad Lions don't lose sleep over the opinions of sheep. Gold $$ Contributor

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    You can't put tape on the base of a piece of brass and make a no-go gauge. Brass varies, plus it is compressable.

    All of the opinions above are what tape to add to a GO-Gauge, not a piece of brass.

    Assuming you have no other reason to doubt that your chamber is in spec, .0065 does not surprise me on random brass.
     
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  12. linebaugh

    linebaugh Silver $$ Contributor

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    Very good point that was kind of lost in the moment.
     
  13. SPJ

    SPJ Silver $$ Contributor

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    Wouldn’t it be simpler to just own both no and go ?
    Just curious
    J
     
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  14. Uncle Ed

    Uncle Ed

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    The average distance between the GO gauge and a Field gauge is .010 and even at the max headspace limits you can still fire form your case to the chamber. And after fire forming your cases all you need to do is setup your sizing dies for minimum shoulder bump

    I collected old milsurp rifles and you learn to accept the rifles headspace and just adjust your dies to your chamber.

    Pacific Tool and Gauge offers three lengths of headspace gauges per rifle caliber. In order from the shortest to longest, they are: GO, NO-GO, and FIELD:
    1. GO: Corresponds to the minimum chamber dimensions. If a rifle closes on a GO gauge, the chamber will accept ammunition that is made to SAAMI’s maximum specifications. The GO gauge is essential for checking a newly-reamed chamber in order to ensure a tight, accurate and safe chamber that will accept SAAMI maximum ammo. Although the GO gauge is necessary for a gunsmith or armorer, it usually has fewer applications for the collector or surplus firearms purchaser.
    2. NO-GO: Corresponds to the maximum headspace Forster recommends for gunsmiths chambering new, bolt action rifles. This is NOT a SAAMI-maximum measurement. If a rifle closes on a NO-GO gauge, it may still be within SAAMI specifications or it may have excessive headspace. To determine if there is excessive headspace, the chamber should then be checked with a FIELD gauge. The NO-GO gauge is a valuable tool for checking a newly-reamed chamber in order to ensure a tight and accurate chamber.
    3. FIELD: Corresponds to the longest safe headspace. If a rifle closes on a FIELD gauge, its chamber is dangerously close to, or longer than, SAAMI’s specified maximum chamber size. If chamber headspace is excessive, the gun should be taken out of service until it has been inspected and repaired by a competent gunsmith. FIELD gauges are slightly shorter than the SAAMI maximum in order to give a small safety margin.


     
  15. jepp2

    jepp2 Gold $$ Contributor

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    Something I do for every rifle I have:
    - I record the following dimensions = case head to datum for: 1. single fired brass, 2. zero headspace brass, where I can just feel the resistance of the brass when closing the bolt, 3. my sizing goal for brass I am going to use (which is 0.002" less than zero headspace)

    When I get new brass, or any other brass, I see how it compares with the sizing I want for the rifle.
     
  16. cw308

    cw308

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    You can use a fired case press out the the primer alittle , close the bolt slowly the primer will seat to the bolt face . Measure how far out the primer is from the case base . Add to the bolt face to datum line measurement will give you a good case gap ( headspace ) measurement . Cheap Go Gauge + .
    Try it twice to double check you numbers . Hope I Helped .

    Chris
     
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  17. Webster

    Webster

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    Why don't you jam the bullets and FF to your chamber. No measurements needed.
     
  18. TAJ45

    TAJ45 Gold $$ Contributor

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    .000 25 = one too many zeroes
     
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  19. watercam

    watercam Gold $$ Contributor

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    Yes it would! Gauges are not expensive. Stop BS-ing around! Jeez, we spend $350 for a barrel, $250+ to have it fit to an action and we are talking about layers of Scotch tape to convert a Go-gauge to a No-Go gauge. Cheese and Rice, what kind of BS smithing are we into here. You can rent the Go, No-go gauges for $8 from 4DReamer rentals. Do that.
     
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  20. Webster

    Webster

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    Reguardless of what the gauges tell you if you can chamber the ammo you have to FF it to your rifles chamber. Jam the bullets ff. Now you have cases that fit your rifle chamber.
     

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