How Much Does Rain Affect Trajectory?

Discussion in 'Competition Forum (All Calibers)' started by clunker, Jan 17, 2019.

  1. 4xforfun

    4xforfun Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2010
    Messages:
    2,403
    But...how many jigawatts is that?:D
     
  2. Bart B.

    Bart B.

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2012
    Messages:
    2,334
    Inside of the hooded aperture on an M1 or M14 match rear sight whose aperture is shaded? I don't think so.

    What about the shaded side of the front sight making the visual horizontal center appear right from where it really is?
     
  3. nmkid

    nmkid Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2014
    Messages:
    2,162
    WOW!!
     
  4. nmkid

    nmkid Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2014
    Messages:
    2,162
    I believe water does not compress at all.
     
    savagedasher, Bc'z and Dgd6mm like this.
  5. mikegaiz

    mikegaiz Stay frosty, my friend. Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2009
    Messages:
    665
    I have only shot in the rain when I had to. So yes, I have shot many times in 1000 yd. matches, in the rain and actually done quite good most under 7in. groups. I think that is mainly due to wind died down. Would the groups I shot in the rain been better with no rain? I have no idea. Maybe the wet targets make the paper / groups shrink?
     
    6MMsteve and savagedasher like this.
  6. Dgd6mm

    Dgd6mm Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2007
    Messages:
    3,108
    This is how I actually feel.
     
  7. Bart B.

    Bart B.

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2012
    Messages:
    2,334
    Water can compress a little bit if there's enough pressure. Glacier ice is about 8% denser than regular ice. A cube of glacier ice in a full to the brim glass of tap water will expand enough to push water up then over the edge.

    From "https://www.quora.com/Is-iceberg-ice-more-dense-or-less-dense-than-normal-ice".....

    "Since icebergs calved from glaciers, their ice density is roughly 0.9 g/cm^3. (The theoretical limit for pure ice is 0.917 g/cm^3.) Not taken into account that icebergs may sometimes contain larger cavities, or some areas with less dense ice, which may make the overall structure lighter.

    The “normal” ice cubes you may have in your coke or your whiskey (if you like that) are lighter than glacier ice, because they contain lots of microscopic air bubbles. That’s also the reason why this ice is white (air bubbles scatter light), whereas glacier ice is blueish. I haven’t measured it, but I would estimate that “normal” ice might lie around 0.8 g/cm^3"
     
  8. Immike

    Immike Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2011
    Messages:
    3,513
    This is off topic but the “light rule” is very old - before they made shaded sights. The rear being closer to your eyes had the most effect on your aim.
     
    Bc'z likes this.
  9. Papa Charlie

    Papa Charlie Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2017
    Messages:
    807
    Glacier ice is by in large a large precentage of air. Glacier ice at the bottom has been compressed and is clear as compared to the surface ice because the air has been completely compressed out.
    However, water I'd H2O, and does compress very slightly because of the oxygen in it. That is why hydraulics use oils which ate void of gases.
     
    savagedasher, Immike and ED3 like this.
  10. Bart B.

    Bart B.

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2012
    Messages:
    2,334
    I thought it is blue because of hardly any air in it. Like my article above says.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2019
  11. Medic505

    Medic505 Dean Wheeler Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2010
    Messages:
    1,221
    Must be why a bottle of Glacier Water cost so much...
     
    Bc'z and Turbulent Turtle like this.
  12. Bc'z

    Bc'z Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2018
    Messages:
    1,275
    How did you know what we had for dinner?
     
  13. Papa Charlie

    Papa Charlie Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2017
    Messages:
    807
    Yes it appears blue but it is a refraction of light through the thick ice. Reduce it's thickness and in fact it is clear.
     
  14. xswanted

    xswanted Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    May 11, 2012
    Messages:
    830
    Just shoot a 6.5 Creedmoor. I hear they will shoot between the drops.
     
    Warren Dean likes this.
  15. Bc'z

    Bc'z Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2018
    Messages:
    1,275
    No the drops get the hell outta the way cuz the know thier fixing to get vaporized.
     
    SPJ, xswanted and savagedasher like this.
  16. Bart B.

    Bart B.

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2012
    Messages:
    2,334
    I disagree.

    It can appear clear because there's less distance between the two ice-air junctions. Just like stacking 10 light blue camera filters next to one. Views through the stack is more blue than the single lens. There's a limit our eyes have discriminating light intensity for each color (frequency).
     
  17. Papa Charlie

    Papa Charlie Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2017
    Messages:
    807
    If you google it you will see many posts regarding this affect. I know it seems weird, but it is the light refraction or scattering of the light and the blue seems to come out. But it is clear.
     
  18. ED3

    ED3 Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2014
    Messages:
    496
    That's a property of water's varying density due to temperature, (Water is most dense at 39ºf/ 4ºc. Above, or below that temperature it expands to a lesser density.), and the composition of the ice (air bubbles, etc).
    Unlike a blue filter lens, water is clear. Any assumed color is from impurities, or more likely the reflection of the atmosphere/ sky.
     
    Comrade Terry, Medic505 and skibar_tx like this.
  19. alinwa

    alinwa

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2013
    Messages:
    1,112
    Ohhhh, so now you're gonna' tell us the sky is blue???

    ((insert shitstirring emoticon here 'cept i don't know how))
     
    Bc'z and 6MMsteve like this.
  20. mtnman31

    mtnman31 Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2016
    Messages:
    53
    In my experience, rain had no measurable effect on the bullet. Rain's affect is on the shooter. When you are cold, wet and miserable, it makes it harder to focus on breaking that perfect shot. It pays to practice, and not always practicing just when the weather is nice and agreeable. Get out there and shoot when it's cold, windy, raining.
     
    hpshooter likes this.

Share This Page