Hornady Concentricity Tool

Discussion in 'Gear Talk: What to Buy? and Gear Evaluations' started by panhandle, May 30, 2009.

  1. panhandle

    panhandle

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    Anyone had a chance to look at this tool yet? Been holding off getting the Sinclair tool and waiting to see what Hornady offered, what are your thoughts on these two?
     
  2. MT300RUM

    MT300RUM

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    I don't think it's in production yet, been wating for this one myself, every time i check with hornady they say available soon,
    looks like a good one, hope it's worth the wait..
     
  3. panhandle

    panhandle

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  4. infantrytrophy

    infantrytrophy

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    I have not used it, but from the pictures it looks like a good tool at a reasonable price.

    I have experience with 2 other concentricity tools - the Forster Co-ax Case & Cartridge Inspector,http://www.forsterproducts.com/Pages/inspector.htm) and the Sinclair concentricity tool,http://www.sinclairintl.com/product/5577/Concentricity-Gauges).

    I find the Forster tool to be more useful for checking bullet runout of a loaded cartridge. The loaded round rests on the base of the case and the bullet tip. Rotating the cartridge and measuring on the bullet about 1/4' from the case neck checks the bullet runout. This is very quick and easy.

    The Hornady tool,based on the pictures) appears to work in the same way, plus there is apparently a way to correct the bullet runout in addition to just measuring it.

    With the Sinclair tool, the case rests on the base and on the body of the case near the shoulder. Any dents or lack of roundness of the brass case will appear to be bullet runout. I found the Sinclair tool to be harder to use to measure bullet runout.
     
  5. panhandle

    panhandle

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  6. jb1000br

    jb1000br

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    Played with one at the SHOT show. Very well thought out tool...just like there powered case-prep center...

    JB
     
  7. nfhjr62

    nfhjr62

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    Has the Hornady tool been released for sale yet
     
  8. mikecr

    mikecr

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    What you found was that the Sinclair wouldn't mask your actual runout, like those pinning the ends..

    Think about the arc a jump-rope produces. If you measure displacement from it near the ends held, your readings will always be low. This, I imagine, is why such systems seem so popular.
    The Sinclair pins the center, moving the arc out to be indicated. No masking that..

    Take your straightest ammo as measured on the fly-by-night gadgets and re-measure with a Sinclair to see the true runout remaining. Go ahead, pry your seated bullets around, but again, your ammo isn't actually straight till you see it so on a Sinclair.

    Dented brass? Not sure how you do that really, but I suspect concentricity is a non-factor there. More important would be to start taking care of your brass.
     
  9. sam3030

    sam3030

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    concentricity tools are a wast of money! Buy a good set of dies and your money will not be wasted. Just so you know Fred Sinclair himself told me that!!!!!
     
  10. jonbearman

    jonbearman I live in new york state,how unfortunate ! Gold $$ Contributor

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    got the new hornady tool and it works great and the price is right. I have a homemade and it sucks. I also have a coaxial from forester and I dont like it. good luck.
     
  11. Bistem

    Bistem

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    Straightened 120 factory 308 rounds with mine the first evening I had it. The factory rounds were all anywhere from .002 to .007 out. The Hornady tool put every single one of them at .001 or better. Bought my Hornady tool from Sinclair. They said they had plenty in stock when i ordered it. One other nice thing is that the tool is so easy to use...you dont have to mount it to the bench. You can straighten rounds with the tool in your lap on the couch while watching movies :)
     
  12. tigil

    tigil

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    I bought the Hornady since 6 month a go and I love this tool
     
  13. nfhjr62

    nfhjr62

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    Have mine now but havn't used it as yet
     
  14. stiles

    stiles

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    All indicated measurements of this nature are relative to the datums selected, it's not an absolute measurement! Feel free to use a .0001" indicator if you feel it's that critical.

    The point of using two of the datums on the bullet is swagged bullets are more concentric than drawn brass. Yes you end up with less indicator movement as a consequence of choosing these datums but you get less of the brass eccentricity to skew the measurement. That may or may not be an issue depending on the brass.

    BTW these "fly-by-night gadgets" have been made for quite some time now, for example LE Wilson made one call the case spinner in the 60's.
     
  15. mikecr

    mikecr

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    Brass runout is entirely what this is all about!
    To discount it is pure foolish..
     
  16. stiles

    stiles

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    I though it was about jump rope displacement! ;)

    So Mike if the brass is somewhat eccentric will its axis be the same in a couple of vee blocks in comparison to a tapered concentric chamber? If so how would you mitigate that problem by modifying the measurement procedure? Will jump ropes be involved?

    So why is the bullet axis deprecated in your opinion. This method uses two datums on the bullet, other than the indicator doesn't move enough to make you happy what is wrong with the measurement?

    Really it would be nice if you didn't imply I'm a fool, it's a bit of a low blow and I could go there too but let's not.

    I do like jump ropes though!
     
  17. wapiti25

    wapiti25

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    I have been looking at tools to measure run-out. I agree with Stiles as to the datum that is used. I have my own machine tools and was looking as to the designe to use. I came to the conclusion that the body of the case and the bullet at point the ojive meets the borlet maybe two points to check. I also think the case neck should be checked to the case body for concentricty. I don't like the base of the case, such as the rim or pressure ring in a fired case for a datum. The body of the case will average when inserted into the chamber unless it is pushed off by the neck, shoulder, throat, ect. I want my ammo held concentric and inline with the bore. I'm looking for more info from any body that could shed light on this subject.
     
  18. wapiti25

    wapiti25

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    I had a thought about this and the Wilson holder that you insert the case into, if the outside cylinder is concentric and straight with the chamber then you could measure the neck and bullet as to how concentric they are to each other.
     
  19. shortaction

    shortaction

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    The Hornady should be a great tool at a afforable price. I probably won't get one till I need a more accurate rifle.
     
  20. olddog

    olddog

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    I have been using the Wilson case holder (for their trimmer) concept as per Wapiti25's suggestion for about a year now. In my mind it shows the relationship between the bullet and the chamber which is what I am concerned with. I don't try to straighten any thing, I just use the data to refine my loading techniques.

    If you use the Wilson holders, be aware that their role stamping on the OD will throw the reading off which is one reason why I make my own holders.

    Roger
     

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