Heavy 10 First Step - Power

Discussion in 'Gun Project Questions & Gunsmithing' started by GSPV, Oct 1, 2018.

  1. tobnpr

    tobnpr

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    As I mentioned back on page 1, the Teco comes with "easy enough" to understand documentation for programming parameters. Manual is available online, easy enough to take a look at it. After buying a PID for my Cerakote oven off Ebay- and throwing it out because the instructions were unreadable- I won't make that mistake again...
     
  2. hoz53

    hoz53 Gold $$ Contributor

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    NEC always applies when doing work like that in your house if it is in a jurisdiction that has adopted NEC as the electrical code there.
     
  3. hoz53

    hoz53 Gold $$ Contributor

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    1. I’ve got a Hitachi drive I would send you to try it out as I have never been able to figure out how to program it. Mabie you could figure it out but I wouldn’t recommend trying it. I am a Licensed Master Electrician. I’m going to get one of the Tecos and try it as I have heard good things about them.

    2. A little three phase motor like you have is easy to start on 220 Volt single phase with no load on it. Check into it and I’m sure you can figure it out. Remember in a rotary phase converter they start the 3 phase idler motor that is part of the RPC on single phase. Of coarse a small 3 phase motor that would work in your lathe is pretty cheap. If you’re using a VFD make sure to get inverter rated motors.
     
  4. GSPV

    GSPV A failure to plan is a plan for failure. Gold $$ Contributor

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    You bring up the very question that I have about my motor. This is a 1965 lathe. I think that it’s likely a 1965 motor. I don’t see anything about being inverter rated.

    That brings up the idea of selling it and getting one that is rated for a VFD and its slightly funky waveforms
     
  5. Someoldguy

    Someoldguy Silver $$ Contributor

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    That's because VFDs or inverters weren't available in the 60s. Motors don't care if the input is a nice analog sine wave or a choppy sorta sine wave, they'll run on either just fine. VFDs were very expensive for a long time until the technology became common and cheap, which is why rotary phase converters were used, which weren't cheap, either. But they were available.

    My SB Heavy 10 runs on a 110V input VFD and that motor is almost as old as I am. ;)
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2018
  6. GSPV

    GSPV A failure to plan is a plan for failure. Gold $$ Contributor

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    That’s why I mentioned its age. It’s good to know that it’ll run on it without issues.

    I believe that the motor is pretty sealed. Will overheating be an issue if I run it at lower speeds? I’d thought about putting a fan on it, but I don’t see a way for the air to circulate. I’ve got fans from rack mounted servers.
     
  7. hoz53

    hoz53 Gold $$ Contributor

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    I’ve talked to industrial maintenance guys who tell me they will put a VFD on aN old motor and run it until it drops then replace with a inverter rated motor. That’s what you should do. It’s the frequency change that will kill a noninverter rated motor. We are not talking thousands of dollars here. You could Mabie get 50 bucks out of the old motor but I doubt it. Used 3phase motors are a dime a dozen. A new motor Mabie 100 bucks or so. No need to overthink it.
     
  8. Dusty Stevens

    Dusty Stevens COVFEFE Gold $$ Contributor

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    Running at slower speeds will cause overheating and a sealed “wash down” motor is even worse. Chambering barrels youll never overheat it. The duty cycle is very very small chambering.
     
  9. sdean

    sdean Silver $$ Contributor

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    You are way over thinking this. Simplest hookup there is a Vfd on a SB lathe. You can use the existing switches on the lathe. Just wire them to the Vfd. You can make this as easy or hard as you want. I made mine hard with a pretty box and Estop and jog switch. If I did again would just use the existing switches. I suggest look at the programming and start the motor slow and stop fast. Push a few buttons and it's done. You have picked the best lathe there is to learn. Most screw ups you just slip the belt. If you overheat anything clambering a barrel you are doing it way wrong. Have fun. Watch a bunch of youtubes.
     
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  10. hoz53

    hoz53 Gold $$ Contributor

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    ^+1
     
  11. GSPV

    GSPV A failure to plan is a plan for failure. Gold $$ Contributor

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    You guys make a great point. Overthinking is a failing of mine. I’ll wire it up to the existing switch and get going. If I want the other features, I’ll add them incrementally.
     
  12. tobnpr

    tobnpr

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    I got lucky as a pig in shit when I repowered mine. Looking for a 3-phase motor on CL at the time, 2 miles from me was a brand new Marathon inverter motor that I picked up for $150 ($1500 list). When I first powered up, the thing shook and vibrated so bad I though it was going to explode. Couldn't figure it out, then someone told me the VFD has an "autotune" function which I guess tunes it's output to the motor. Above my pay grade as to how, but after that was done no more vibration- just a bit of a high frequency "whine".

    My understanding though, is that inverter duty isn't a big deal unless you plan on running the motor for any length of time at a substantial frequency deviation. I can run mine at double-120hz, or a fraction, with no damage- but honestly never mess with the frequency much, still shift the belt. Inverter duty has to do with the windings' insulation, built to take the heat that a typical 60 hz motor cannot.
     
  13. tn6br

    tn6br Silver $$ Contributor

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    I have the teco for my Bridgeport mill and with no 3 phase experience, wired and programmed the vfd with external start/stop, brake, and directional switches in about 3 hours. The remote switches are easy to install and program in on the teco.
     
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  14. GSPV

    GSPV A failure to plan is a plan for failure. Gold $$ Contributor

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    OK, guys, to make things flow easier, I ordered the Teco L510 1 HP, 230 1P input, 230 3P output VFD.
     

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  15. tobnpr

    tobnpr

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    Had no problems with my L510. Wire the drum switch on the lathe into the low-voltage control side, easy peasy.
     
  16. GSPV

    GSPV A failure to plan is a plan for failure. Gold $$ Contributor

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    My motor is a 1 HP with a 1.25 duty factor. It is sealed. My Teco L510 was delivered today.

    I have fans from rack mounted servers available to me for free.

    With my motor being sealed, with my labor and fan being free, is there any longevity benefit to wiring in a fan (or even more than one)?

    TIA!
     
  17. Daveinjax

    Daveinjax Silver $$ Contributor

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    You’re over thinking again...:). With the level of work you are going to do I seriously doubt you’ll ever get the motor warm enough to do any damage. But as you say your labor and the fan is free.
     
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  18. GSPV

    GSPV A failure to plan is a plan for failure. Gold $$ Contributor

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    Thanks! That’s the kind of answer that I like!
     
  19. hoz53

    hoz53 Gold $$ Contributor

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    Instead of thinking about the motor think about keeping the VFD cool. If you mount it in an enclosure it could overheat. Might want to use one of those fans for that. Check out the manual/specs
     
  20. GSPV

    GSPV A failure to plan is a plan for failure. Gold $$ Contributor

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    Will do. Thanks!
     

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