Heavy 10 First Step - Power

Discussion in 'Gun Project Questions & Gunsmithing' started by GSPV, Oct 1, 2018.

  1. GSPV

    GSPV A failure to plan is a plan for failure.

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    Those are thumbnails. You can click them and the full images will appear.

    The switch does say "Forward" and "Reverse". The box is a fused disconnect.

    Those are the only electrical components.
     
  2. hoz53

    hoz53 Gold $$ Contributor

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    Ok thanks I see them now.
     
  3. GSPV

    GSPV A failure to plan is a plan for failure.

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    So, the remote controls for the VFD would replace the Forward/Reverse switch, and the fused disconnect would just go away (as it would be on the other side of the VFD), right?
     
  4. hoz53

    hoz53 Gold $$ Contributor

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    Yeah the fused disconnect needs to be on line side of VFD. I believe you could rewire the forward/reverse switch into the controls of the VFD if you want to. You’d have to add a POT for your speed control.
     
  5. GSPV

    GSPV A failure to plan is a plan for failure.

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    Thanks! I didn't think about keeping the F/R.
     
  6. alinwa

    alinwa

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    OK, I'm not an electrician of any sort...... but I bought an old belt-head Bridgeport wired for 440 from a college where it'd been wired as true 3-phase so I had this quandary.

    And I bought a cheapo (like 50-70bucks) VFD and left the right/off/left switch on it. I DID NOT buy the cigar-shaped thingy's that allow for instant stoppage......I cannot STOP the rotation quickly nor just hit reverse as some can. I gotta let the mo'chine wind down and at the end of day I turn off the VFD and it winds down for a few minutes as I walk away.

    But it took me all of a half hour to figger out how to wire it and I LOVE IT! (Almost as much as the cheapo (Easson) DRO's I installed.)

    It's a great hobbyist machine. The VFD and DRO's make it great.

    I've also got a Heavy 10 that is set up to just plug and play and it works fine. And I'm seriously thinking of getting a VFD for it, just because.... I'm not even trying to be "helpful" here cuz I'm an infant in arms with this stuff, just sayin' I LIKE VFD'S

    At least so far.
     
  7. hoz53

    hoz53 Gold $$ Contributor

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    So your heavy 10 has a 3 Faze motor on it?....?
     
  8. tobnpr

    tobnpr

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    I wired my fwd/stop/rev switch right into the low-voltage control side of the VFD.
    Same switch, same location , same operation as "pre-vfd".

    Far as the dangerous nature of machinery mentioned prior, no doubt.
    But belt-drives like SB's are inherently and tremendously safer than a big geared-head.
    That's one of the reasons they were the standard in vo-tech and smithing schools- usually no one gets seriously hurt, and the lathe survives when some idiot crashes it hard.

    As gunsmiths, we don't need (generally speaking) to tear off 500 thou per pass- which is what a production, job shop might need.
    Its about tightness and precision- 1/2 horsepower is all that's needed to work on an. 1-1/4" hollow steel tube!
     
  9. alinwa

    alinwa

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    Nope..... it has a standup conduit with an electric meter box sized box up top (4X8X12-ish?) and plugs into 110. I've never looked in the box...but I'm reasonably sure it doesn't have a rotary phase converter in it
     
  10. hoz53

    hoz53 Gold $$ Contributor

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    If it’s a single phase motor you can’t use a VFD. Need a 3Faze for that.
     
  11. alinwa

    alinwa

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    Ohhhh, duhh...!

    See how I am? I got's the 'lectrical thought process of a child.
     
  12. hoz53

    hoz53 Gold $$ Contributor

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    It’s OK — Nobody can do or know it all. You’ve got your good side to:D
     
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  13. SPJ

    SPJ Silver $$ Contributor

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    Wouldn't it be simpler to upgrade your power source. Then have an electrical contractor pull a permit and wire it correctly?
     
  14. Daveinjax

    Daveinjax Silver $$ Contributor

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    Three phase is rarely available in a residential area and there is usually a charge for three phase power if it is available. A VFD or RPC is much cheaper in the short and long run. Think of permitting , electrical upgrades , then ongoing charges for three phase. A VFD provides many benefits. Variable speed , electric braking , combined with sensors it can stop the threading so you don’t run into the shoulder. Along with the variable speed you can greatly over speed and under speed the motor allowing for higher and lower RPM than would otherwise be available. A VFD is the optimal choice. It takes a little effort to install and learn to use but it opens up a world of capabilities.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2018
  15. SPJ

    SPJ Silver $$ Contributor

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    I know nothing about aVFD however I do spend a considerable amount of time developing properties and working with electricians.
    I simply walk in to the power company and pose my questions.
    Upgrading a transformer is not that expensive in most cases, electrical permits are cheap.
    I'd like to follow this thread a bit more if you all don't mind I'm sure I'll learn quite a bit.
    Thx in advance
    Jim
     
  16. spitfire_er

    spitfire_er Silver $$ Contributor

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    I've put probably 12 vfd's on various machines with great results. Usually use the factory on/off/ reversing switch and a pot.



    I usually use teco's from dealerselectric.com

    I have used a cheap one off Ebay and after figuring out how to program it, and set just about every parameter, it worked great.

    I've recently picked up a North American rotary phase converter PL-5. http://www.northamericaphaseconverters.com/shop/category/pro-line-rotary-phase-converters/

    Picked a brand new one up from their Ebay store for about $400. They use baldor generators to boot.!

    I have not set mine up yet, but I got sick of rewiring machines and figured with the rotary unit, I can just plug and play.
     
  17. liljoe

    liljoe Silver $$ Contributor

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    I paid $215 for the VFD on my mill. I probably couldn't get an electrician to show up to my house for that much.
    20180413_160042.jpg
     
  18. GSPV

    GSPV A failure to plan is a plan for failure.

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    I called the power company about 3 phase. They laughed at me.
     
  19. alinwa

    alinwa

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    LOL!!!

    Yeahhh, THIS part of the question I DO know about. I deal with 4 power companies and 7 different Building Depts and jurisdictions every day.......And I paid over $10,000.00 to get power into my own home, it would have cost me another $6,000.00 to prep for three-phase (which wasn't even AVAILABLE AS AN OPTION until the rock pit next door paid $20,000,000.00 to get it up to the pit..... NOW I could get the exter leg installed, for around $10-12,000.00

    BTW I just love the phrase in a prior post "simpler.... contractor pull a permit?"

    Again

    LOL!!
     
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  20. SPJ

    SPJ Silver $$ Contributor

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    That's a big number
     

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