Heavy 10 First Step - Power

Discussion in 'Gun Project Questions & Gunsmithing' started by GSPV, Oct 1, 2018.

  1. GSPV

    GSPV A failure to plan is a plan for failure.

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    Guys,

    My SBH10 was run on 3 phase power.

    I’m assuming that this means that it has a three phase motor. How would I verify this?

    If it is 3 phase, what are my options for running it on home electric service?

    Replace the motor? Some kind of converter? Can a VFD alone do this?

    Dusty, helpful man that he is, pointed me to this converter http://vi.raptor.ebaydesc.com/ws/eB...tegory=185148&pm=1&ds=0&t=1533943346000&ver=0

    Warning, this may lead to a “benefits of a VFD” followup.

    Thanks in advance,
     
  2. hoz53

    hoz53 Gold $$ Contributor

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    the motor has a nameplate. it will say on there. get/make a rotary phase converter or a vfd that converts single to three phase and privides speed control. or change motor to single phase.
    be aware if you go the vfd route it may shorten the life your existing motor, that is ok though you can get an inverter rated motor then
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2018
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  3. TRA

    TRA Gold $$ Contributor

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    Buy the VFD and get it over with. You will cry once and be thankful you did.
     
  4. GSPV

    GSPV A failure to plan is a plan for failure.

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    Thank you for the reply. I’m wondering about the motor because the cabinet has a big honking electrical box on the back. I’ll check on it tonight and let you guys know.
     
  5. hpshooter

    hpshooter Gold $$ Contributor

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    "My SBH10 was run on 3 phase power."

    VFD drives in the size range you would need have become very reasonable. Generally, 3ph. drives will give a better surface finish in machining operations.

    There are many on this forum who are more up to date on current state of the art VFD's who can give you options to chose from.

    You are on the threshold of a great learning experience!
    Be safe.
     
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  6. GSPV

    GSPV A failure to plan is a plan for failure.

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    That brings up the benefit of a VFD and how to use it.

    I was over on practical machinist. The concensus seemed to be to use the pulleys for most speed control and the VFD for only fine speed adjustment.

    Is that true in our context? Where I’ll mostly be doing 416R?

    Greg J
     
  7. GSPV

    GSPV A failure to plan is a plan for failure.

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    Thank you for the info. I’ve looked at prices and they seem reasonable to me.

    I gotta tell you guys...this is like when I got my first centerfire rifle. It’s an exciting and slightly scary new world.
     
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  8. GenePoole

    GenePoole

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    I tend to agree. I intended to install a rheostat to mine for speed control, and mount it near the ON/OFF/KILL switches, but I find I get enough range out of the pulleys (yours probably has 4 step pulleys; mine has only 3) and only jack with the speed control for slow speeds (like for threading) or very high speeds (for polishing). I've never used the back-gear since getting a VFD.
     
  9. GSPV

    GSPV A failure to plan is a plan for failure.

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    If I do go the VFD route, which would you guys recommend? Or, what are the parameters.

    120 in or 240?

    I have to check the motor to make sure what it needs. Was told that it was three phase. Don’t know voltage.
     
  10. shortgrass

    shortgrass

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    The CNCs in the shop have infinitely variable spindle speeds and feeds. The manual machines, the lathes and mills, require belt or gear shift changes. I have never felt hindered because the manual machines were not variable speed, and I have been machining for a long time (40+yrs). The VFD is probably the lowest cost way to get your little lathe running, but variable speed is NOT required to do go work. Knowledge and know-how is!
     
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  11. Tim Singleton

    Tim Singleton Silver $$ Contributor

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    Chambering and threading a barrel is really a pretty straight forward simple operation
    Dont know if you have any maching experience
    If not check into a local trade school and in the mean time the good old south bend how to run a lathe published I think 1941 is a good place to start
     
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  12. GSPV

    GSPV A failure to plan is a plan for failure.

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    I have no hands on machining experience. Going to a trade school is the opposite of practical for me. I’m going to learn hands on, with manuals and YouTube.

    Need to get this puppy running first. First step to that is power. First step to power seems like it is verifying what the current motor is. Then, advance from there.

    I’ll report back tonight.
     
  13. Daveinjax

    Daveinjax Silver $$ Contributor

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    You always get the advice to take a class at the local vocational school or community college. You guys are way behind the times. Most of these programs are all CNC now. I looked around my area and there’s nothing manual available anymore.
     
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  14. Tim Singleton

    Tim Singleton Silver $$ Contributor

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    I guess you are right on the trade schools I'm behind times they may not have a manual lathe in the shop
     
  15. tobnpr

    tobnpr

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    I converted my SB to a VFD with 1hp, inverter duty 3 phase motor.

    And honestly, since most of my lathe work is barrel work- there isn't a whole lot of belt shifting anyway, and I rarely mess with the rheostat on the VFD even though it's simple enough to do so. If the existing 3 phase motor is 1 horse or less, you can run it off a 120v VFD (if over, you need a 220v VFD).

    I use a Teco L510- relatively "simple", compared to some I looked at, when it comes to programming the parameters. A simple to understand manual is critical- so avoid cheap Fleabay units with Chinglish instructions.
     
  16. jkl

    jkl Gold $$ Contributor

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    VFD I have a rotary converter on my mill but put a VFD on my heavy 10. Bite the bullet.

    john
     
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  17. hogpatrol

    hogpatrol Gold $$ Contributor

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    Check with the local high schools. Some have adult education night classes.
     
  18. hogpatrol

    hogpatrol Gold $$ Contributor

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    Make sure your health insurance is paid up, maybe life insurance too. No, I'm not kidding

    You Tube? Ok, lesson #1.

     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2018
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  19. hoz53

    hoz53 Gold $$ Contributor

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    In our state you can find CC classes for manual machines- guess it depends where you live
     
  20. hoz53

    hoz53 Gold $$ Contributor

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    +1 on this- people have been maimed and killed by metal lathes and it happens in an instant- before you can react.
     

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