First time, last minute Prarie dog trip. Questions.

Discussion in 'Varminter & Hunting Forum' started by 59f100292, Jul 8, 2019.

  1. Tommie

    Tommie Gold $$ Contributor

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    Bump a little more. If you are already chambering tight, things will likely get worse. Fouling, dust and heat can make things get sticky after several hours and dozens of rounds on the prairie.
     
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  2. fyrewall

    fyrewall

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    Be prepared for horrible heat, terrible temperatures - like over 90 F. Cool and clean everything periodically, including the chamber; I turn a 7mm brush with a strip of solvent dampened paper towel twisted around it, inside the chamber to clean it. Wipe off dust & crud from the bolt periodically, and lube lugs with grease. Develop a shooting cadence that will conserve ammo and prevent toasting out your barrel. When I use my .22-.250, its 1 minute between rounds, cool off barrel with wet paper towel, and quick clean @ 25 rounds. I have heard stories of barrels being "toasted out" during one long rodent engagement. Good idea to duplicate essential stuff for field and keep your home bench stuff intact. Move deliberately and thoughtfully. The rodents have horrible habits like cannibalism. consume crops, harbor disease/filth, and make hazardous holes. Shoot all of them!
     
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  3. JSH

    JSH

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    Just saw an interesting comment else where on rounds fired. I did the math on what the gent said he shot, gave him a 10 hour day shooting.
    According to his numbers and my math, he took a shot every 105 seconds for 10 hourso_O.........that is still a lot if it was two guys shooting!
     
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  4. Coyotefurharvester

    Coyotefurharvester

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    Double check your firearm and ammo packing. Had a guy show up with a 12ga scoped single shot and 500 rounds of 223. His kid grabbed shotgun instead of the single shot scoped 223(heavy barrel).
     
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  5. LeoHuhta

    LeoHuhta

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    IF there is an AR in the collection bring a spare firing pin and extra bolt components.
    Sucks to loose or break something when there are lots of dogs in front of you
     
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  6. Randall Hardy

    Randall Hardy Silver $$ Contributor

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    When we first started going we would shoot 3-400 rounds in a day. Multiple rifles, multiple calibers. Now we shoot in a week what we shot in a day or two. Now it's more quality verses quantity. As others have said it will be hot as h#$# so.plan.on shooting early and later in the day. Bring shade and an abundance of beverages.
    And have a ball!
    Randy
     
  7. Tommie

    Tommie Gold $$ Contributor

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    Here’s THE REAL DEAL:

    You will either
    A) Not bring all that you’ll need
    -or-
    B) Bring way too much stuff

    It’s OK. You’ll still have a great experience.

    Make a list on paper or computer of everything you’re taking on the trip. While on the prairie, make a mental note of any “whoops, should have brought X.” After the trip, adjust your list. Your next poodle safari (yes you can’t stop after the first one) will go much smoother. My buddies and I maintain a communal list on an Excel spreadsheet. Guns and ammo are the easy stuff.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2019
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  8. Calgary Bill

    Calgary Bill

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    There is a wealth of information in this thread.
    Mention was made of bringing a GPS and I couldn't agree more.
    Where I hunt there is no cell coverage and it can be a long hike to a travelled road if you get stuck or break down. So, I bought a Garmin In Reach this spring that give me the capability of texting via satellite. Also has the SOS function in case of a life threatening situation. I have a few local contact numbers in case of break down or getting stuck. A message to my contacts gives them my coordinates so they can find me.
     
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  9. 59f100292

    59f100292

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    I’ll have to bum a spare BCG and see if headspace checks.
     
  10. CT10ring

    CT10ring Gold $$ Contributor

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    here's my list. I'm headed out very soon, altho it will be really hot, what the heck. I bring plenty rifles :) 22BR prob my fav.
    I camp out "there" and ride a mtn bike some. shooting : I walk + shoot prone vs shoot from a truck...
    I keep a pelican case or 2 ready to go, so alot of my stuff is stashed in em. you're gonna love it, PD shootin!
     

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  11. 59f100292

    59f100292

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    Thanks for the packing list.

    What do you guys consider a reasonable pace of shooting. I don’t want to be that guy that burns out a barrel in one day of shooting. I’m most concerned about the 22-250. Do you have a routine for time between shots, time between strings?
     
  12. SBS

    SBS Gold $$ Contributor

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    Hard to have an exact routine, depends on load, air temperature and wind. I feel my barrel often and when too hot to comfortably hold, I change rifles or just let it cool. Pretty easy to torch the throat with calibers that have a high ratio of powder to bore diameter. I single load which helps slow the rate of fire.
     
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  13. searcher

    searcher

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    If your shots will be inside the 500 yards or so - I'd load up much lighter bullets for your 6XC, such as 75 V-Max. If you shoot a 6 PPC or lighter target rifle - even 62 to 70 grain hollow point target bullets you might have will do fine - though without the "air time" you get with varmint bullets. Not being able to see your hits due to the recoil of the heavier bullets then requires a spotter to watch your shots. When the shooting is hot and heavy - no one wants to spot for long - so having the lighter bullets is a big deal. Do take those heavy bullets along for the shots waaay out there. You will be glad you did. Just be sure of your backstop or lack of need for one. I'd leave the 22/250 as it gets way too hot too fast and won't do anything your 6xc can do. Instead of that - buy or borrow an heavy-barreled .223 for most of your shooting while your 6xc is cooling. You will get 20 shots out of your .223 for every 10 in the 6xc before cooling, depending on how fast you are shooting. Consider a .17HMR or other rimfire for short range within a few hundred yards. Above all - go to the range and shoot your loads at 100 yard intervals out to much farther than you think you will shoot, then you can extrapolate that into 25 yard increments past 350 yards or so. When you shoot past 400 or so yards- the bullet really starts dropping so you really need to know your impact levels. Be sure to note for temperature effect for every 10 degrees past 300 because 50 degree temp swings will keep you making incremental adjustments to compensate. Another reason not to take "max" loads unless you have tried them in hot weather. Take a big umbrella to position over your bench or tripod. You'll be glad you did. Take extra batteries for your range finder. If the critters show - you will have a lot of fun if you have lots of ammo, liquids, and shade. Be sure to take a tow-strap for the vehicle and beg or borrow a sat-phone from anyone you know of that has one or will rent you one. Have fun!
     
  14. searcher

    searcher

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    In my rifles, I shoot mostly moly bullets and will shoot up to 200 rounds in a rifle, then run bore cleaner and bronze brush (about 15 strokes), then run a chamber brush and give a dozen twists to maintain the carbon ring ahead of the chamber. When not shooting moly bullets, I cut that in half. In the A/R's, I follow this by spraying carbon blaster through the upper, disassemble the bolt, clean, lube and back together. We are talking like five minutes for a bolt gun and ten for an A/R, tops. In the evening, I give it another cleaning and let the solvent soak a bit. That has worked well for many years. As for your pace of shooting - that will depend on whether you have multiple guns to rotate and how many critters there are. Pretty common to shoot around 300 or 400 rounds per day. If, as you say, most shooting will be inside 500 yards - maybe 2/3 of that would likely be with your rimfire and .223. Frankly - it could all be done without your 6xc, though you will almost certainly have opportunity for further shots. Your pace with the 6xc can be as fast as you can shoot 10 or 12 rounds - but your cooling period will be longer than if you are shooting like one every minute or more. If the pace is slow - like a shot every for or five minutes - you really don't have to stop and cool much at all - though when the air temp really gets up (like 90+), that too will dictate how much to cool. A wet towel helps tremendously. Stop shooting when your barrel is too hot to hold onto comfortably.
     

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