First center fire deer rifle for a boy ?

Discussion in 'Varminter & Hunting Forum' started by XTR, Jan 19, 2019.

  1. Immike

    Immike Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2011
    Messages:
    3,633
    I personally don’t think a break is a good idea for young ears. Just wanted to say that, Thank you
     
    msinc, brians356, Bc'z and 1 other person like this.
  2. savagedasher

    savagedasher

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2012
    Messages:
    6,858
    Savage had a great break you could turn it open when on the bench with ear protection and turn it off when hunting
    The best thing I ever did was put a break on muzzle loader 150 gr load kicks like a 223
     
    Immike likes this.
  3. Evan

    Evan Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2010
    Messages:
    686
    243 all the way.

    Also, make them wear ear protection. I consider it child abuse to let a child shoot without ear protection. They aren't old enough to make the decision to go deaf for themselves. You wouldn't let them gouge their own eyes out, don't let them blow their ears out.
     
    mikeinct, daleboy, Immike and 2 others like this.
  4. TC260

    TC260

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    230
    Yes a break is harder on ears than unbraked. However, unbraked is hardly doing our ears good service either. Unprotected, every pull of the trigger does permanent damage to our hearing.

    Unless there's a can on it, braked or unbraked, I'm not and my girls aren't pulling the trigger without hearing protection. It's so easy these days to protect their ears these days too with inexpensive electronic muffs like the Howard Leights. 30 years ago I started with ear plugs on a plastic band around my neck that I popped in before the shot. Gravitated to electronic muffs 15yrs? ago. Now I use in-ear protection. They're more expensive but very convenient and I use them through bow season as well just for the hearing amplification.
     
    Evan, timeout, Immike and 2 others like this.
  5. okie

    okie Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2007
    Messages:
    667
    thats neat--I need a 12 volt schoolbus fan on the end of mine to see if I made the shot!!
     
  6. TC260

    TC260

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    230
    For my youngest I'm planning to put together a Contender 7tcu carbine for next season. Probably a tapered 18" or 20" barrel, in other words, something dad wants to hunt with too when they're not there :D
     
  7. AckleymanII

    AckleymanII Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    May 11, 2006
    Messages:
    2,503
    That will be a world class rifle for any age!
     
  8. bobinpa

    bobinpa Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2007
    Messages:
    832
    I started out with a Rem 788 carbine in 243. It was my first rifle and I still have it. I never had any trouble killing deer with 100 gr Remington core-lokts..... I also killed a lot of ground hogs with it. There are other choices, but in my opinion, you can't go wrong with a 243. Very versatile, lighter recoil etc.... If you get into other choices, there are a lot of cartridges that can be loaded down and still do very well. My nephew started out with a 308. We were all worried about the recoil for him, so I loaded some 125 gr Ballistic tips. The recoil was similar to a 243 and they are devastating on deer too. Just something else to consider.
     
  9. msalm

    msalm

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2007
    Messages:
    212
    I’ve put together my kids rifles and helped others with their children’s ‘first deer rifle’... probably 8 or more at this point and not one of them was a 243 or 223. Will they do the job, yes, sure they will...will they do the job with a poor hit? There are cartridges that might offer a little more leeway. Yes the Creed is a very viable one, maybe ideal. So far I’ve built a light 250 Savage (awesome!), 6.5 Grendel’s in the Howa Mini (great little rifle!), a couple 7mm-08’s, a 7-30 waters on the Contender frame (worked well for deer and a bear), and lately a couple of the Creedmoor’s. Loaded with 100-120gr bullets it is a low recoil, great deer rifle.

    The suggestion of a Howa barreled action with two stocks is a good one, picked up one (in Creed) for a niece last summer and she got her first deer this fall with it. Great trigger, accurate, and relatively lightweight with the 22” sporter barrel.

    30-30’s kick, a #1 is not that light, and for a first rifle I think there are better choices. For the money a #1 will run, a nice Tikka lightweight in any of the medium calibers would be a hell of a nice first rifle. 260 Rem or 7mm-08 would be my first picks.
     
  10. AckleymanII

    AckleymanII Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    May 11, 2006
    Messages:
    2,503
    Measure the child's length of pull, start there.

    Get the child to bend their index finger like they are pulling the trigger, then measure from that point to the crease in their elbow as a general rule of thumb.

    Prepare yourself for a shock in how short the stock will have to be for them to properly mount the rifle and see through the scope.

    Thompson Contenders have very little weight on the front end, and for this reason, they can be very easy for a child to handle. Plastic stocks for contenders are inexpensive, save the original stock, cut the replacement plastic stock and attach a recoil pad for the correct length of pull. I saw one TC set up for a small child where the owner cut the plastic stock, filled it with foam, then bondo, added a small slip on limb saver recoil pad. He kept adding 1" sections as the child grew until the original wood stock fit the youngster around 14 years old. The caliber was 30/30 starting out with Remington reduced recoil loads.
     
    msinc, Bojo and snert like this.
  11. STRSRLVR

    STRSRLVR Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2010
    Messages:
    128
    I started by little boy off with a wood stocked tikka 223 1:8 twist and cut the LOP down to about 11” and made a few spacers. It’s and absolute hammer with just about everything. This year he received a seekins Havak in 6.5 Creedmoor for his first deer hunt. I removed the factory pad and just slipped on a bear tooth cover on the end and added a APA LB brake. He loves shooting it and handles the recoil just fine even though he’s about 55lbs soaking wet. He even managed to break it in with a doe at 436.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2019
  12. fyrewall

    fyrewall

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2017
    Messages:
    601
    How long is the deer season 2-4 weeks. Get the kid a 6.5 Creedmore and let him learn about rifles & shooting. Buy lots of bullets.
     
  13. onelastshot

    onelastshot Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    May 6, 2012
    Messages:
    926
    Bought my son a 7-30 Waters youth model at age nine. Fit him perfectly. Dropped his first deer at 90 yards with one shot. I've never seen a kid that excited.
     
  14. Bulletbob

    Bulletbob

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2016
    Messages:
    72
    I do not disagree with many of the choices discussed here, and I am a 6.5 lover, mainly the 6.5x47. But my choice to start a kid out on and am going to get my Grandson a Howa mini action in a 6.5 Grendel. No recoil plenty of killing power, even out to 350~400 yards. Which is not a guess it is proven. And there is plenty of really good factory ammo available. Its something to think about.
     
  15. wkdickinson

    wkdickinson Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2012
    Messages:
    69
    I would suggest considering a 700 Mtn rifle in 7mm-08 with a Leupold 2-8X32 VX3 (or similar). The rifle it light and easy to carry, the 7-08 won't beat him up to bad, yet it is a really good deer round and it will serve him well for almost anything he want to hunt, for the rest of his life. My son loves his!
     
  16. simo hayha

    simo hayha

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2014
    Messages:
    168
    50bmg.....all the kids at school will be jealous... All of them
     
    msinc and Bc'z like this.
  17. RegionRat

    RegionRat

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2011
    Messages:
    40
    Another vote for 243, since you asked.
    He will still use it even after he grows and can handle a bigger rig. It will remain useful for varmint, predator, distance, etc., much more so than a .30-30 would later on.
     
  18. Rdlningcltchdmpr

    Rdlningcltchdmpr Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2019
    Messages:
    208
  19. KY-Windage

    KY-Windage

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2018
    Messages:
    16
    For a kid I think a 257 Roberts would be better for deer.
     
  20. Jdne5b

    Jdne5b Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2011
    Messages:
    1,039
    C'mon Wade. The real answer is 6.5 Creedmoor.
     

Share This Page