External scope adjusters

Discussion in 'Main Message Board' started by StraightPipes, Mar 28, 2010.

  1. StraightPipes

    StraightPipes

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    I have decided to look into the world of the "external scope adjustment systems". Ivey, Buckeys and some others. The variants of the "Unertl" that are produced today have caught my eye.

    Bob Brackney builds a system that Beggs has used, U.S.Optics builds a variant used on the SN-9. The u.s.o. aft portion is "a big one" to consider. Are there any photos of the Brackney system somewhere in the shooting world? I would like to see a close up of Mr. Brackneys before calling him.

    These are what I have found to date, are there others that anyone cares to suggest?
     
  2. BoydAllen

    BoydAllen Site $$ Contributor

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    There ya go.
    http://accurateshooter.wordpress.com/2008/05/12/beggs-develops-radical-rig-in-west-texas-tunnel/
    Bob mechanically ( and reversibly) freezes Leupold competition series Benchrest scopes and mounts them in an external adjustable ring setup that features compressed rubber of some sort between the scope and front ring as a means of achieving a reliable, on slop, pivot system. His adjusters come in more than one style, but I believe all use 40 threads per inch. This past weekend at Visalia Dennis Thornbury ran away from the pack with a .15xx agg. shooting his heavy at 100 yds. He was using one of Bob's setups.
     
  3. StraightPipes

    StraightPipes

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    Thank you Mr.Allen. From what I can find, the rear mount on most of the Unertl variants is "one piece" . Meaning that it might be typical to have to remove the ocular assembly from the main tube to install the adjusters and the mount. The mount cannot be split and reassembled like a standard ring, yes?
    Brackneys mount must be installed while being part of the scope freezing package, before the eye box is installed? Or am I missing something? If this is the case, let me ask another question. I "will" attempt the removal of my ocular assembly, just wondering what parts (internal) will go flying?

    You see, I will stop at nothing to try something new. But, I dont know what is housed at this end of the scope. Could it be as easy as unscrewing the assembly and "not" disturbing any of the erector assembly? My first attempt will be on a "fixed" , not a variable scope.

    So, is the Brackney mount one piece? Can the micrometers be removed and leave enough area to pass the scope through?

    Anyone care to lead the blind, just jump in here!
     
  4. BoydAllen

    BoydAllen Site $$ Contributor

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    First of all, I am only working from what I remember of what I was told. The fixed power Competition Series Leupolds use a system to tension the erector tube pivot that involves a lock ring loading a wave spring. I believe that when Bob freezes the scopes he adds a spacer so that the lock nut seats solidly, freezing the joint. Doing this requires removing the eyepiece, so the rear ring not being able to be split is not a problem. I would seriously think about buying the package, and having Bob do the entire job. Also, I would make sure that I had a problem before fixing it.
     
  5. Tozguy

    Tozguy Site $$ Contributor

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    I wonder if the pros use special dry gas when closing up a scope. If ambient air gets into the scope won't it risk fogging the lens. Should this be a deterrent for DIY scope work?
     
  6. StraightPipes

    StraightPipes

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    Thats a good question to ask the shooters here that do the freeze/lock-up jobs. I dont think the gas purging / sealing could be applied here. Most common is nitrogen I believe , and is used to displace atmosphere/ moisture before final assembly.
     
  7. BoydAllen

    BoydAllen Site $$ Contributor

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    I have heard of no reported problems of the sort you mention. Evidently it is not a big issue.
     

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