BUBBLE LEVEL

Discussion in 'Gear Talk: What to Buy? and Gear Evaluations' started by schooner, Nov 28, 2017.

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  1. mram10

    mram10 Silver $$ Contributor

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    I am writing this in a neutral, scientific tone and no offense is meant :)
    It isn't a matter of liking or not liking, the point is "do they work"? Mathematically they work. They are proven to work. For me, I have tried both ways and seen many people shoot better with them including myself. If I had not experience in this, I would sit back and eat my popcorn.
    OP, yes they work and you should try shooting at 600+ with and without one to see if you like it. Buy a $5 Chinese ebay one, a $20 one or a $100 one that does your dishes. Up to you, but you should try one. If you hunt LR, then up in the mountains it is a must in my opinion because trees, brush, etc are not always perfectly plumb.
    Type in "scope level shooting" in youtube and watch a few videos also.
     
  2. Meangreen

    Meangreen

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    You are only correct to a degree. Yes, a shooter may set up his rifle with a small amount of cant to suit his body position and level the crosshairs and adjust his zero to compensate. However, you are wrong in the assertion that POI would not change.

    The error is present because the line of sight and the line of departure (bore line) are no longer in the same plane with respect to the pull of gravity. The more the cant, the greater the error. As the rifle rotates, whatever correction was put on to compensate for the pull of gravity is continually decreased until it becomes 0 at 90 degrees of cant.

    At the same time, the windage correction is continually increased as the line of departure and the line of sight move more toward being in the same horzontal plane.
     
  3. mram10

    mram10 Silver $$ Contributor

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    OP,
    Mean brings up a good example of why a "tall target test" is needed when you mount a scope. Quick basics:
    1. Mount scope on rifle using levels on action and top turret. This gets you close.
    2. Line up vertical crosshair with plumb line hanging off something in your yard, NOT buildings, etc that might not be perfectly level.
    3. Go do a "tall target test"
    Seems like a lot, but you will see the results at 1000 and be glad you spent the extra 20 minutes and handful of shots to get it right.
     
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  4. jr600yd

    jr600yd

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    Mean is correct and I guess I didn't fully explain. I was talking about a perfect rifle scope set up. Other variables creep in with our rifles. Things like are the scope base holes drilled in perfect alignment with the bore, are the bases and rings perfectly square to each other and barrel harmonics just to name a few.

    So, is a level worth it?

    For my competition rifles yes. For me it's taken one of the WTF? Variables out of the equation. Now when I make a sight adjustment the POI goes in that direction. No extra windage or elevation is added.

    On my hunting rifles no. My hunting is limited to 300 yds or less so I've found I don't need one.

    This is what works for me, your milage may vary.
     
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