Borden bumps

Discussion in 'Gun Project Questions & Gunsmithing' started by JLDavid, Nov 6, 2018.

  1. JLDavid

    JLDavid GO BEAVS!! Silver $$ Contributor

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    I am thinking about trying out some Borden bumps on a bolt here in the near future. My question is are the bumps tigged or migged on the bolt? Is one better than the other? Just curious as I have a pretty good tig guy here in town but if migging works good I can do it myself. Thanks in advance for the advise.

    David
     
  2. Puzzaz01

    Puzzaz01 Gold $$ Contributor

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    Just curious to see the responses you're going to get on this one.
    @Greg Taylor ....... you might want to add to this. .???

    Darrin
     
  3. Greg Taylor

    Greg Taylor Site $$ Sponsor

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    David,

    A wonderful question, however.....

    The Borden Bumps technology is a patented technology. If you attempt to do them without Jim's permission, you risk all sorts of trouble. Jim is a great guy, I'm sure if you called him and discussed your interest in that technology and got his blessing, he will give you all the info you brain can handle.
     
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  4. JLDavid

    JLDavid GO BEAVS!! Silver $$ Contributor

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    Ok thanks. Was not aware that there were patents on them. Would you have a good phone # and/or email address to contact him?

    David
     
  5. Greg Taylor

    Greg Taylor Site $$ Sponsor

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    All that said....they are neither tigged, nor migged ;)
     
  6. Greg Taylor

    Greg Taylor Site $$ Sponsor

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  7. JLDavid

    JLDavid GO BEAVS!! Silver $$ Contributor

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    Email sent to Mr. Borden. Thanks Greg for heading me off at the pass!!!!

    David
     
  8. Dusty Stevens

    Dusty Stevens COVFEFE Gold $$ Contributor

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  9. boltfluter

    boltfluter

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    I would imagine the bumps are ground in with the bolt body running out of true. Just speculation on my part.:D:D

    Paul
     
  10. Will Henry

    Will Henry

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    I prefer the dovetailed inserts which I use on Remingtons, Winchesters, Rugers, Mausers, Enfields, Howas, Sakos, etc. I have also used welding on a Savage where the bolt body was too hard to mill but the inserts are my first choice. Forty years ago, bushing the bolt was SOP and that was commonly done by BR 'smiths everywhere. The dovetailed inserts were, like Borden's bumps, a means to tighten up the bolt, in battery, without affecting function otherwise. I don't know who first started making oval bolts. It may have been Jim Borden or it may have been someone else. In general, I am a firm believer in the old adage, "There is nothing new under the sun". WH
     
  11. JLDavid

    JLDavid GO BEAVS!! Silver $$ Contributor

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    I have got a lot of responses about this and appreciate them all. My thought was to weld spots on the bolt behind the lugs and in front of the bolt handle then turn them down to closely fit the bolthole to avoid sleeving the bolt, not that that is a overwhelming process. The bumps would be positioned to hold the bolt when it is in battery but run in the lug raceways while cycling the bolt. I was not aware that the Borden bumps were not appied to the bolt but the bolt was ground that way. Luckily I was able to talk to an experienced gunsmith that explained the bumps to me. It all makes sense now. Thanks again for all the input. Lots of knowledge on this forum.

    David
     
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  12. boltfluter

    boltfluter

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    Does anyone have any pics they care to share of the dovetail set up for the bumps? Thanks.:D

    Paul
     
  13. paperpuncher

    paperpuncher Silver $$ Contributor

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    Heres a pic of the dovetail Not my work something I saved from a thread dovetailsfilled-0.jpg
     
  14. boltfluter

    boltfluter

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    Thanks paper puncher. Looks like a very cool option for doing this.:D:D

    Paul
     
  15. Dusty Stevens

    Dusty Stevens COVFEFE Gold $$ Contributor

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    You can buy those dovetail blanks from brownells to fill in existing dovetails, cut em in then indicate the bolt body and turn the dovetails til it fits. Its by far the easiest, fastest and cleanest method
     
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  16. shortgrass

    shortgrass

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    And, I'd say it beats the he!! out of welding on bolts!
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2018 at 5:23 AM
  17. Alex Wheeler

    Alex Wheeler Gold $$ Contributor

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    I think you will be well served by full diameter sleeves or a new better fitting bolt. Even Borden actions are full diameter 360 degrees not oblong "bumps" now. Its a better way to go in my opinion.
     
  18. Will Henry

    Will Henry

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    By the way, I have never like the idea of cutting a dovetail right behind the lugs. The truth is, if the rear of the bolt is centered and the lugs and seats are square, the bolt has to align when the lugs are engaging the seats. The Enfield, with it's angled seats, is even better in this regard. If I am making a new bolt, my prefernce is to simply make a closer fitting bolt but for remedial purposes, I favor the inserts. The whole point is to reduce the amount of deflect by the contact with the angled sear and to stabilize the rear of the bolt.
    At the front of the bolt, things are a little different depending on whether the extractor rotates with the bolt (Remington) or is stationary (Winchester, Mauser). WH
     
  19. Dusty Stevens

    Dusty Stevens COVFEFE Gold $$ Contributor

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    I guess i forgot to mention you only need these on the back
     
  20. X Ring Accuracy

    X Ring Accuracy Site $$ Sponsor

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    A labor of love. : )
     

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