Best Trigger for Remington 700

Discussion in 'Main Message Board' started by fe1, Aug 22, 2019.

  1. antelopedundee

    antelopedundee

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    Don't see one for us portsiders!
     
  2. McGraw

    McGraw Silver $$ Contributor

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    Timney has a new 700 trigger out called the “HIT”. 8 ounces to 2 pound pull weight. Has anyone tried one of these yet?
     
  3. Robert

    Robert Silver $$ Contributor

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    Most of the triggers mentioned earlier are single stage. The Geissele Super 700is a TRUE 2-stage with a single-stage option.
    R.G.C
     
  4. urbanrifleman

    urbanrifleman Site $$ Sponsor

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    I shot the Tubb trigger at David's place. It was incredible too.
     
  5. mauser284

    mauser284

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    Your asking for an absolute for something that is at best an opinion or belief. You did not define clearly in the OP what is meant by "Best". For 99.9% of the shooting sports and hunting I do you are either limited by how light your trigger can be or you would not want too light of a trigger for safety. So a Jewel Trigger especialy one of the lighter ones would be terrible to me. In fact I tend to like two stage triggers that break like glass with 1.5 to 3 pounds. How they break and consistency matter more to me. People make too much about the trigger in 90% of instances. Outside of BR I have never seen a person swap out a trigger and instantly shrink their groups or become more consistent. Just like you do not buy a new pair of running shows and instantly shave 3 seconds of your time! Reality does not work like that and usually peoples perception and beliefs have no basis in fact. A trigger has to be pretty awful to truly affect your accuracy when talking about a rifle. So many other things need to happen before the trigger becomes a real player. Now if talking handguns especialy striker fired self loaders triggers can make a much larger difference.
     
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  6. brians356

    brians356 Gold $$ Contributor

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    Apples and oranges, friend. Robinson is refinishing wooden gunstocks by first scraping off old finish, scraping/burnishing the bare wood, then rubbing on Birchwood Casey Tru-oil finish which contains oils! He applies a silicone sealer atop a rubbed oil finish. When I said "gluing and/or refinishing" I meant applying a finish such as lacquer or paint, which requires squeaky clean wood or metal, in the context of preparation by using a degreaser. When you hand rub a wooden stock with an oil finish, you don't care about contaminating the wood for later painting.

    I'll say it again: Ronsonol is an effective cleaner and degreaser.
    -
     
  7. David101

    David101

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    No argument about Ronsonol as a cleaner and de greaser. I have finished many stocks using Tung oil and then a Silicon oil to give it that real gleam. I dont like the Tru oil my self as it contains a lacquer that while it will harden the wood and seal it. It really seals it so that no more oils or waxes (oils) can soak in. Silicon oil is not harmful to steel or wood which is what I took from your initial post. This makes it good for guns as it will not stain the wood like some spray on water dispersion products will.

    WD 40 will dry and leave a crusty film the Silicon Spray I have tested does not. So for Triggers that can not be taken apart a flush with the Silcon is a good periodic maintenance. I also use it on my target rifle bolts just on the tube not the lugs keeps them sliding like they were on rollers just slick, the lugs always get the lithium grease.
     
  8. brians356

    brians356 Gold $$ Contributor

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    Someone in a different thread claimed charcoal lighter fluid leaves a thin film of lube behind. Crossposting my response here:

    I ran an experiment: I cleaned an inch-square portion a plate of glass lying on my bench squeaky clean using Gun Scrubber and paper towel. Then I poured a small puddle of Kingsford charcoal lighter fluid on that spot and let it evaporate for a few hours. With a desk lamp reflecting off the glass, I could not see any residue or film remaining. Then I took a fresh strip of Scotch Magic Tape and stuck it firmly where the lighter fluid had evaporated, rubbing it down and letting it "seat" for a minute. I then grasped one end of the tape strip and peeled it off. It took the same force to peel from the glass as when I subsequently ran the same tape test on glass cleaned only with Gun Scrubber. If there was the faintest "film" of lubricant on that glass, the tape simply would not stick nearly as well if at all. Looking at it another way: Any film of lubricant slight enough not to affect the tape would also be too slight to provide any lubricating effect on a trigger.
    -
     
  9. boltman13

    boltman13 Gold $$ Contributor

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    IF you run your loads on the hot side and occasionally blow a primer, you can break a Jewell. I have done this twice. I still love how a Jewell feels and am having my Remington bolts bushed which will help. I am putting a Schillen on the rifle I just broke the Jewell on, but plan to stay with the Jewell on my other rifle. I would recommend a Jewell but also have your bolt bushed, and stay away from hot loads just in case.
     
  10. Don_Parsons

    Don_Parsons

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    The conundrum is what trigger will you get use to...

    I started with factory Remington triggers then did a match grade Jewel,,, I used it for 4 years from competition to hunting with an adjustment,,, this spring I thought I'd save some funds and bought a after market trigger at 1/2 the cost...

    Don't get me right or wrong,,, its a awesome unit,,, but it dosen't have the same crisp break as my Jewel,,, not because it cost less,,, its because its not tuned for what I'm use to...

    Purhaps the question is,,, can we fine tune a trigger to what were after...

    Its up to us to find this out,,, it might happen over night,,, or it will take a few trips to the range or some time spent dry firing under different conditions to bring it on...

    Like the old guy said,,,, real trigger control comes from with-in...

    PS: My hunting trigger control goes out the window as I focus on shot placement...

    One trigger for all the above and things I've yet to learn or under stand...
     
  11. fourpower

    fourpower

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    I am a poor man but I went with Rifle Basic triggers 9 years ago and now have 8 of them on Remington rifles! I have had zero problems with any of them and if you want they are easy to adjust. all my pull weights stay right on the money.
     
  12. Thauglor

    Thauglor Gold $$ Contributor

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    Found this thread while researching triggers, and it might be the best place.

    Anyone know which Remington 700 2 stage triggers has the most over travel? I prefer lots of it for silhouette. Currently have a Bix tac sport, and just received a CG22 so will try that too.
     

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