Best Source for Learning Reloading Basics

Discussion in 'Reloading Forum (All Calibers)' started by clunker, Jan 21, 2019.

  1. clunker

    clunker Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2018
    Messages:
    369
    Unless earth gets hit by an asteroid, I should have cash-in-hand from selling my house in about 90 days. I'm sure I will have no problem finding suggestions from other forum members for how to spend some of that money. Fortunately for me, I'm not married, and the dog has to do what I tell her, so at the top of my list is quality reloading gear. I have never reloaded. In fact, I've never seen anyone reload, so this will be a major learning experience. Can someone recommend a book or website where I can read up on how to get started?
     
  2. Dusty Stevens

    Dusty Stevens COVFEFE- Thread Derail Crew Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    May 8, 2014
    Messages:
    13,341
    Go visit a good reloader- a competition shooter- and hang out. Youll see what works and what doesnt real quick and save a ton. Youll feel like you switched to geico
     
  3. AJC

    AJC

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2018
    Messages:
    363
    I like Johnny's reloading bench on YouTube, and the book metallic cartridge handloading.
    Those should give you a ton of material to review. How what you shoot and how you want to load makes a huge difference. On one hand you can crank out huge volume on a dillion or use an arbor press and le Wilson dies. Choose your flavor
     
  4. savagedasher

    savagedasher

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2012
    Messages:
    6,855
    Po Ackley Books
     
  5. K22

    K22

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2011
    Messages:
    1,981
    First educate yourself by reading the Lyman Reloading Handbook which will give you the basics and a little more.

    Second, if possible, hook up with an experienced precision shooter at a local gun club who reloads. Offer to take him to dinner in exchange for walking you through the reloading process, A to Z and suggesting equipment to purchase to get you started in the right direction. This instruction shouldn't take more than an hour.

    While I wouldn't recommend this approach; I taught myself reloading in the late 60's with nothing more than a Lyman Manual. With today's resources on the internet you should have no trouble learning to reload even if the second option listed above isn't available. Also use this site for questions and suggestions on equipment.

    Reloading is not difficult if you follow the basics and are reasonably intelligent.
     
  6. clunker

    clunker Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2018
    Messages:
    369
    There are a few forum members where I am headed (Portland), and there's a F-class group at the gun club I want to join. Guaranteed I will find many reloaders, but I want to have a basic understanding before wasting anyone's time. I research everything because I don't want to be the guy who doesn't even know what a press is before asking for help. Of course, endless hours of research also resulted in the purchase of a 6.5 Creedmoor.
     
    Bc'z and SPJ like this.
  7. KentuckyFisherman

    KentuckyFisherman

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    Messages:
    44
    Dusty's advice to find a seasoned loader is spot on and will likely keep you from buying a lot of stuff you aren't ready for yet. But I would also recommend you buy 2-3 manuals and read the basic reloading instructions in each about 3-4 times. They will each explain the process a little differently, and as the steps begin to make sense then when you read them the 2nd and 3rd times things will make even more sense. A lot of folks consider the Lyman manuals to be written mostly for lead-bullet loaders, but I think that manual has always had one of the best sections for beginning loaders. I found the Lyman 2002 manual available for free as a PDF right here. Yes, it's from 2002, but guess what ... the basics haven't changed. Read it a few times and then also buy manuals from Hornady, Speer or Sierra. I use a lot of Lee equipment, but steer clear of their reloading manual.

    Here's one warning I give all prospective reloaders: Don't try to apply common sense to reloading or you'll blow yourself up. For example, common sense and your high school science teacher would assume that if a given amount of powder is safe in a cartridge, then any amount less than that would also be safe. Not so, and following that logic can get you hurt. Also, common sense might indicate that if you want to go up from one weight bullet to a heavier bullet, then you naturally have to increase the powder charge. Again, that's not always true.

    Sorry for the long post.
     
    Rsadams and Mad_Charlie like this.
  8. AJC

    AJC

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2018
    Messages:
    363
    I am quite intrested in his stuff but dont know the best volume to get. Can you recommend a certain book.
     
  9. AJC

    AJC

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2018
    Messages:
    363
    The lyman casting manual has a lot of chapters dedicated to the correct mixing of led and casting techniques. A great book but might be better after the reloading handle has been pulled a couple thousand times.
     
    Bc'z likes this.
  10. savagedasher

    savagedasher

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2012
    Messages:
    6,855
    Both
     
  11. gunsandgunsmithing

    gunsandgunsmithing The best tuners and wind flags on the market Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2007
    Messages:
    3,154
    Best place imo for reloading basics are the numerous loading manuals. Nosler has a very good one that is very detailed and gives step by step instructions on getting started. From there, it's a never ending process.
     
    Rsadams, pacificman and Bc'z like this.
  12. Dos XX

    Dos XX Bystanders Should Also Wear Safety Goggles Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    May 30, 2013
    Messages:
    1,159
    This is the book that got me started. I don't care for his writing style. His good ole boy style of language actually buries what he is trying to say in a couple of places. You aren't going to load BR quality ammo from this book, but it gave me enough confidence to load my first rounds and shoot them without pooping myself.

    If your goal is F Class, it will get you started. I eventually progressed to more involved processes. It covers shoulder bumping, primer seating, neck turning vs not neck turning, bullet seating, weighing powder vs throwing powder, case head expansion, pressure signs, and more. It has pictures to boot. I think for a beginner, this book and a reloading manual or two will get you shooting.
    41024QhhD7L._SY373_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
     
  13. Falfan2017

    Falfan2017

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2018
    Messages:
    601
    I started with ABCs of reloading and YouTube, made a bunch of plinking 9mm and 223 and then tried to get more accurate with 30-06 and finally into competition reloading with the wealth of knowledge on this site. Best advice would be shadow somebody who’s an expert benchrest shooter and see what they’re doing and what they’re using. That will save you at least a couple years of trial and error. Also start with good equipment. Lot of people keep buying better and better stuff. Just buy once cry once.
     
  14. savagedasher

    savagedasher

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2012
    Messages:
    6,855
    I think every reloaded should have knowledge of the do and dont of reloading the should have known if what the wrong powder can do and under pressure .
    And know what over charge and under charge can do to guns
    Po Ackley bookscover it all
     
  15. oldduc

    oldduc Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2018
    Messages:
    203
    You can take a precision reloading class from Holland's Gunsmith & Shooters Supply, in Powers, Oregon.
    https://www.hollandguns.com

    Oregon Precision Reloading Classes ($500)
    4 persons per class maximum
    Class dates:

    April 30- May 1 - 2019
    May 21-22 - 2019


    We supply all components for the course, Winchester 308 brass, Sierra 168 Matchkings, primers and Varget powder. Students use our loading equipment to perform all loading tasks, from neck turning/measuring, brass prep, priming, powdering and seating for the completed round. We provide this course to help the student gain a complete understanding of load development, including seating depth, powder and primer choices and other critical factors involved in the creation of consistently accurate and optimum-power ammunition. We keep the loaded rounds for shooting school students.


    Contact us any time by phone during working hours
    (9:00 AM to 3:00 PM PST)
    for appointments for private tutorials.
    E-mails are another option that can be used any time you like.

    Phone: 541.439.5155
    Fax: 541.439.2105
    P.O. Box 69 / Powers, Oregon 97466
    www.hollandguns.com
    E-mail - BestRifles@gmail.com
     
    savagedasher likes this.
  16. David Christian

    David Christian Gold $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2017
    Messages:
    122
    @clunker, are you looking at Tri-County, Douglas Ridge or both? Our 600 yard group shoots every Tuesday night at TCGC at 6pm. Reach out to the discipline chair, @F Class John, and he can give you the details—guests are welcome, you just need to get the gate code. We talk reloading for a hour ahead of time as well.
     
    SPJ likes this.
  17. oldduc

    oldduc Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2018
    Messages:
    203
    Actually, that last sentence of the description worries me. I'm not sure why they keep ammo for shooting the students, but I'd keep my eyes open. :eek:
     
    joshb, SPJ, Mad_Charlie and 3 others like this.
  18. uncle-buck

    uncle-buck

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2014
    Messages:
    139
    "The Beginner's Guide to Reloading Ammunition" by Steve Gregersen is a good primer (no pun intended) on metallic reloading.
     
  19. grovey

    grovey Silver $$ Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2012
    Messages:
    804
    There used to be a video on youtube by David Tubb . It was about 2hrs long if memory serves. I found it easy to follow, and quite helpful in learning the basics and perhaps a bit beyond. They yanked it, and started selling what used to be free. Last time I saw it Sierra was selling it on their website for like 30 bucks. If you could find it it'd get you started, and you could pass it along to the next guy asking this same question.
     
  20. bloc

    bloc

    Joined:
    May 24, 2014
    Messages:
    196
    This ^^^^^^

    The reloading manuals from the manufacturers of reloading expendables and reloading equipment are the place to start. Period. These books will give you a great sense of the general. This will be your intellectual framework, a kind of one-size-that-SAFELY-fits-all. These books will emphasize basics and safety uber alles. Begin with the KISS principle.

    Once you've read them, then iron out inconsistencies by attaching yourself to competitive shooters who reload. They will give you the benefit of their personal experience, and you will need to pick which details and fine points you wish to incorporate with your basic understanding . . . and which you don't.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2019

Share This Page