Anti Seized for Stainless Barrel

Discussion in 'Gun Project Questions & Gunsmithing' started by gsg5pk, May 12, 2016.

  1. gsg5pk

    gsg5pk

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    Which type of anti-seized will proper for stainless barrel & stainless action?
     

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  2. spclark

    spclark Gold $$ Contributor

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    Any of those besides the bottom three will work fine.

    Most any good hardware store or any auto parts shop ought to have products that will also.

    I use Permatex brand, their product #80071, 4 oz. Comes in a little grey plastic bottle about 2-1/2" round & tall, forgot what I paid but it's got to be less than $10. You can buy it in tubes too but I prefer something I can close securely.
     
  3. 338 Mollett

    338 Mollett

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    +1 on Permatex, it also works well on the back of bolt lugs.
     
  4. Dusty Stevens

    Dusty Stevens COVFEFE Gold $$ Contributor

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    Why not just use grease? I dont know of any gunsmith that uses anti seize and i know the rest use grease
     
  5. clowdis

    clowdis

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    I use grease. I've tried anti-seize but the stuff like to travel. If I use some in the morning it's all over the shop by afternoon. It does work though.
     
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  6. DaveTooley

    DaveTooley Silver $$ Contributor

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    I've had to saw off two barrels, bore the tenon out and send the actions back to BAT to have the treads cleaned up.

    As recommended by Bruce Thom, Jet lube 550 from then on.
     
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  7. JimPag

    JimPag Silver $$ Contributor

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    Loctite C5-A copper based anti-seize lubricant
     
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  8. Ggmac

    Ggmac

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    Loctite copper mil spec
     
  9. Changeling

    Changeling

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    Crazy question, but I don't know: I have food grade anti seize (Loctite brand) that I use on water filters and kitchen faucets , all the faucets in the house actually, can this be used with no problems?
    I would think so but one never knows, therefore the question. I've been using it for a long time on all connections and haven't had any problems.
     
  10. spclark

    spclark Gold $$ Contributor

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    Conditions on water supply connections are completely different than those where barrel threads meet action threads.

    I use silicone grease meant for water supply fittings when assembling faucets using neoprene or butyl o-rings, yellow teflon paste where metal to metal contact occurs.

    I'd rather use a product intended for the conditions expected rather than make do with whatever's handy when pricey actions & barrels are involved.

    Same with anti-sieze on bolt lugs: stuff gets all over as it is (same with silicone grease!) so I use synthetic grease on bolt lugs. Does the job, cleans off relatively easily, not pricey.
     
  11. WayneShaw

    WayneShaw

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    I used to use anti-sieze, that crap gets on stuff even on the other side of the room!

    I use Extreme Pressure (EP) grease, which is what the grease is for bolt lugs. Be sure to coat the shoulder. If the threads aren't too tight to begin with, you should be fine.
     
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  12. Larryh128

    Larryh128

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    Anti-seize does get on everything, even being careful but comes off with alcohol. I use nickel anti-seize on every thread on a rifle that means anything, I'll clean it up later. What I do know is that barrels come off when & how they are supposed to and threads aren't boogered up.
     
  13. BoydAllen

    BoydAllen

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    In addition to keeping threads from seizing, there is a role that anti-seize plays in the stability of the joint between the action and the barrel. One does not want the barrel to shift around relative to the action because that would be detrimental to accuracy. In his book, Rifle Accuracy Facts, Harold Vaughn wrote of testing that he did on this subject. Because his testing was not done with stainless components (guessing about the barrel(s) but he did mention that the action was a Remington 721), he was able to get away with using oil on barrel threads. The one takeaway for me was that products that contain Teflon, or lanolin do not seem to be desirable for this application. I think that anyone who is interested in rifle accuracy would benefit from reading this book several times. One may take exception to individual parts, but as a whole, it is a unique look into factors that I have not seen addressed elsewhere.

    I have an early Viper action. Its front insert (threads and locking lug abutments) has thread milled threads that are intentionally tapered (slightly tighter toward the back) to distribute the load more evenly. Close examination of the threads reveals a machining pattern that is more textured than typical lathe or tap cut threads. I think that in this application both are beneficial to joint stability. Based on admittedly slim experience, I have come to the conclusion that a relatively loose thread fit may be beneficial, and that this may be because the working parts of the threads may be nearer to their elastic limit after the barrel is tightened. From time to time, I clean out the action threads with an old tooth brush and some sort of solvent (whatever is handy) because I do not think that it is desirable that anti-seize particulates accumulate. When I apply anti-seize to barrel threads, I use an acid flux brush to create the thinnest possible layer that colors the entire surface evenly.
     
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  14. waltk

    waltk Gold $$ Contributor

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    I use Bostik, NEVER SEEZ, pure nickel special anti-seize and lubricating compound for my SS barrels and actions. It contains no copper.
     
  15. spclark

    spclark Gold $$ Contributor

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    Same here.

    As for the words I underlined, I'm disinclined to add <uneven or rough-cut> to the definition of loose.

    Properly fitted threads will be cut square & concentric to bore axis with a finish & geometry that permits them to be drawn tight when the mating surfaces are 99% in contact, not before.

    Anti-seize plays an important role when that last 1% gets drawn down.
     
  16. Rustystud

    Rustystud Site $$ Sponsor

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    This question pops up about every year. Ask your self "why and what are your trying to do?" Barrels are just like any other threads, the seize because of corrosion or galling. What is best for corrosion a moisture dispersing lubricant. What is best to prevent galling, a high pressure lubricant. Yes, copper is a high pressure lubricant, but it does nothing to displace moisture. It his hard to beat a high temperature molly grease. Inexpensive, and provides moisture dispersion and lubricity. Actions tend to heat up and cool causing condensation. The Machinist Handbook is the Bible of threads, it recommends "grease" to be used when properly torqueing threads.
    Spend your bucks on high dollar antiseize products it want out perform high temperature grease for rifle tenons.
    Nat Lambeth
     
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  17. Ggmac

    Ggmac

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    Stainless on stainless has unique requirements , just ask Ruger
     
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  18. shortgrass

    shortgrass

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    or S&W... A couple of years after the introduction of their SS revolvers, S&W had to abandon the SS internals for carbon steels/alloys. SS against SS wasn't working out so well.
     
  19. carlsbad

    carlsbad Lions don't lose sleep over the opinions of sheep. Gold $$ Contributor

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    nickel or copper
     
  20. DennisH

    DennisH Life Time NRA member Silver $$ Contributor

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    The Copper or Marine Grade is my favorites. Use both sparingly. Of course there is nothing wrong with white grease.

    JMO, Dennis
     

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