A question for stocksmiths

Discussion in 'Main Message Board' started by johnfred1965, Sep 13, 2017.

  1. johnfred1965

    johnfred1965 Silver $$ Contributor

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    I poted a question about repairing a stock in the gunsmithing section, but after getting the broken pieces back from the manufacturer, I do not feel comfortable trying to repair it myself. The grain runs across the wrist, and I feel if I glue it, it will just crack again. I am thinking of some type of pin or screw to reinforce the area, but there is so little wood to work with, I don't want to do it myself. Is there anyone out there that can make this repair at a reasonable cost, or can recommend someone that can? I am in central Ky, but don't mind shipping it out to the right person.
     
  2. FatBoy

    FatBoy

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  3. joshb

    joshb Gold $$ Contributor

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  4. Lapua40X

    Lapua40X California Hunter Education Instructor Silver $$ Contributor

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    I understand how intimidating it can be when doing your own stock repairs. Whether you want to try it or not, perhaps you or someone else may want to consider what I've done when repairing broken pieces like the one you describe.
    I take great pains in developing a clamping mechanism that will hold the pieces securely in place when realigned. I then drill one or more holes (depending on the break and the area accessible) from one side through the mating side, as deep as practically possible, using a drill bit size that corresponds with a specific size of hardwood dowel rod. With the holes drilled and all debris blown out (compressed air) I use a high quality carpenters glue (I like Elmer's E7040) applied to both broken surfaces, the drilled holes and the dowel(s). Driving the dowels into place and clamping the pieces for 24 hours typically produces a stronger union than the original solid piece. Then I simply follow up with refinishing.
    Takes patience and careful attention to details but it works very well.
    Best of luck ......
     
  5. Dan Rossiter

    Dan Rossiter

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    Try Pedersons Gunshop in Ludington Michigan. Tell him what you have,maybe with a photo or two. Repairing broken stocks is kind of a sideline with him but he's very good. Engraving is his specialty.
     
  6. gme

    gme Site $$ Sponsor

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    doantrevor.com
     
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  7. johnfred1965

    johnfred1965 Silver $$ Contributor

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    It is a burl walnut varminter stock. There are a couple of pics of the crack
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    I will have some more pics of the stock in two pieces, the only place there is wood is right on the sides. The front half looks like a U where the action and trigger cutout is.

    I will take some better hi rex pics, maybe without the glare tomorrow
     
  8. johnfred1965

    johnfred1965 Silver $$ Contributor

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    I hear he is an artist, but would I have to wait 6 months for him to get to me? I also considered Joel Russo because of the quality of his work, but I don't know if I can afford either one!
     
  9. ben lurkin

    ben lurkin

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    It's a bit tough to see but it appears the problem is going to be there isn't a lot of wood in that area of the stock. It's too thin to use dowels to reinforce the area. I would suggest using a thin wood glue to glue the two pieces together. Let that dry for at least a day. Then, with a dremel tool, or similar, CAREFULLY hollow out the areas around the crack inside the stock. I would remove at least an inch of wood from either side of the crack. You will want to remove about half the wood between the inside and outside of the stock. Next, find some strips of walnut and using a LOT of epoxy (a good acraglass gel or similar with fiberglass fibers will work well), glue the walnut strips into the areas you've hollowed out making sure the grain runs parallel to the stock. If you are familiar with fishplating, this is what we are trying to do here. Fill in as much of the area as you can without interfereing with the action/trigger and rebed the entire action area to reduce stresses in this area. I did this with a stock similar to yours and you could hardly tell it was broken and it never failed in a 243.

    If this is a 458 Mag or another big boomer, just get another stock. I had a buddy who repaired a stock like this in a 300 mag and he was always worried about it splintering and injuring him once it did. This caused him to lose his concentration and the last time he used it he pulled up on a deer and never shot because of it! The stock never failed, but his confidence sure did. It was restocked after that.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2017
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  10. gme

    gme Site $$ Sponsor

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    Doan turns work around pretty quick, he never charges enough for the time and effort ;)
     
  11. joshb

    joshb Gold $$ Contributor

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    Burl. The grain is beautiful but a major headache in a stock. Nice but boring straight grain is best in that area, especially if it's a boomer. Maybe one of the pros can fix it? Good luck
     
  12. johnfred1965

    johnfred1965 Silver $$ Contributor

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    here are some more pics
     

    Attached Files:

  13. billshehane

    billshehane

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    Those pictures tell a better story! I think you need to seek another stock on this site because I do not think anyone would try and repair that at all.

    Good luck

    Bill
     
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  14. Ggmac

    Ggmac

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    I would start looking for another stock . That may be repaired in looks only I would never trust it as a hunting rifle or other .
     
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  15. joshb

    joshb Gold $$ Contributor

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    I have to agree with Bill and Gary. That stock is toast. You can see the grain of the wood running perpendicular to the action. The weakest configuration for a gun stock. Even if you fixed it, it would prolly break again. If it's "special" to you, the guy that mentioned hogging out material from the inside and glueing in stronger, straight grained wood is on the right track. Even then, it could still break again in the future. Sorry for the bad news. It was prolly a very pretty stock. When I make mine from a pretty piece of wood, I position the curly grain in the butt and the straight grain around the action.
    IMG_1280.jpg
     
  16. ben lurkin

    ben lurkin

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    Much better pics. Gonna have to revoke my post above though. I wouldn't try to repair that one. There's just no way to adequately reinforce it. It's unfortunate. It's nice looking piece of wood.
     

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