.222 Rem. VS. .223 Rem.

Discussion in 'Main Message Board' started by Ross308, Sep 14, 2011.

  1. Ross308

    Ross308

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    Got a 300 yd. bench rest shoot comeing up and have some questions on the range of these two rifles. The .222 Rem. effective range is listed as up to 250 yds. in the old reloading manuals that I have. Yet the ballistics listed for the two rounds are really close for the same weight bullets. For instance the .222 is 2734 with the 70 grn. bullet and the .223 is 2753 fps. BL-C(2) powder. I've read of people competeing with the .223 at some pretty extreme ranges. At least in my estimation. I must be missing something obvious here for there to be that much difference in the effective ranges of the two rounds.
     
  2. chj3

    chj3 Site $$ Contributor

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    Perhaps related to their history -- typically .222s were focused on lighter bullets, 1:14" twist (or even slower in the older Sakos) and the newer .223s may have barrels in the 7" to 9" twist range.

    Doubt if many people have .222s (or, better, .222 Mags) set up with fast twist barrels for 600 yd or beyond. In the case of the .223, some people may be motivated to try it because of things like F/TR matches where only .223 and .308 are acceptable.

    Think it would be interesting to have a .222 Mag, but guess most people go with a .223 due to availability/cost of brass, loaded ammo, etc.
     
  3. tenring

    tenring Site $$ Contributor

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    I have numerous .222's both hunting and target rifles, and they are all slow twist barrels: 12-14" I am limited to 52 gr. bullets in those. On the other hand I have a Savage with 7" twist which works well with 80 and 90 gr. VLDs. I shoot in 500 meter matches, but many folks are using the same combination at much longer ranges. Its all about bullets and the right twist.
     
  4. fdshuster

    fdshuster Site $$ Contributor

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    It's also about case powder capacity. The little 222 ( have 2 chamberings) is limited to approx. 22 grs. vs the 223 that will hold approx. 27 grs. depending on powder type. Extra powder = longer range possibilities. I've also found the 222 to be limited realistically to 250 yds., but that's only under ideal conditions. Good solid rest, high quality scope, no wind, well defined target, etc., conditions that are seldom encountered. I've watched several attempt to compete in some of our local benchrest g'hog match's at 1,2 & 300 yds. As has been my experience, great at 1 & 200, but starts to have "issues" at 300. 223 will give up some short range accuracy to the 222, but will more than make up for it at 300 & beyond. My son regularly competes in F-Class F/TR (Master Class) 600 yard match's with his Hart barreled 1-7 223 with the 80 SMK's & has been very successful with that combination. tenring: Both my 222's are 14 twist & I also have to limit them to the 53 gr. SMK, but even at that 50 gr. is optimal. Great ctg., just don't expect more from it than it can deliver. ;) ps: chj3: I also tried a 222 Rem. Mag. Easily equal to the 223, but gave up on it because of the crappy Remington brass. Nothing but the superior Lapua is used in the 223 Rem.
     
  5. WyleWD

    WyleWD

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    Ross308, I think it comes down to what "someone's" definition of effective range is and that varies from one keyboard to the next. As you noted there isn't a lot of velocity difference between the two cartridges you mentioned so for some one to think that one is kaput after 250yds and the other is effective out to 600yds and beyond is just plain silly. There is SOME logic to this sport. ;D ;) WD
     
  6. Ross308

    Ross308

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    Thanks for all the feed back. I guess between the twist in rifleing and case capacity, the .222 will have to remain a 200 yd. tack driver. Which is not a bad thing.
    Does bring up another question. The .222 I have is a Savage model 112 J series. Single shot. The action will take up to a .308. I've been shooting a Rem. Varmiter in .308 off the bench and it is accurate enough for the type of shooting I'm doing. But lately it's been kind of rattleing my bones more than it used to. Not as much fun as it was in years gone by. Now I've scratched the .222 because of range and the .222 magnum because of lousy brass. What would be a first choice caliber that would get the job done, at least to 300 yds., and maybe beyond, without getting beat up to bad?Does the .30BR kick as hard as the .308 for instance? Thanks for any thoughts on the subject.
    Dan R.
     
  7. Larryh128

    Larryh128 Site $$ Contributor

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    The 30 BR will not have as much recoil as a 308. I would probably look at a 6.5 x 47 Lapua. Very accurate cartridge & you have Lapua brass & all the loading data easily available. As close to plug & play as you'll get.
     
  8. fdshuster

    fdshuster Site $$ Contributor

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    6 BR with a no-turn neck, Lapua brass, load & shoot like any other cartridge, except be prepared for excellent, consistant, really, really small groups.
     
  9. MrMajestic

    MrMajestic Site $$ Contributor

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    What they said! Both great cartridges a little more bullet weight and BC with the 6.5, my favorite diameter!
     

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